Share this story...
Latest News

GOP presidential candidate Carly Fiorina speaks with Arizonans on illegal immigration

Republican presidential candidate Carly Fiorina speaks at the Practical Federalism Forum hosted by American Principles Project held at Southern New Hampshire University in Hooksett, N.H., Saturday, Oct. 3, 2015. (AP Photo/Cheryl Senter)

PHOENIX — Republican presidential candidate Carly Fiorina had the opportunity to address the concerns of several Arizonans Monday night, many of which revolved around the issue of illegal immigration.

In a Arizona-based telephone conference, Fiorina spoke on her views on illegal immigration and how she would handle the issue if she were elected President.

“My view is that if you’ve come here illegally, you don’t have a pathway to citizenship,” Fiorina said in response to a question from a Scottsdale resident. “There is an opportunity to earn a legal status and we know too many who have done it the right away. There is no consequence for a failure to uphold the law.”

Fiorina said securing the U.S.-Mexico border is not “rocket science,” but acknowledged that there needs to be a different kind of leadership to solve these problems at both the local and Federal levels.

“It’s not rocket science to secure the border,” she said in response to a question about Border Patrol. “It’s not rocket science to keep violent criminals in jail. It’s not rocket science to provide law enforcement with funding to get the job done, yet it’s not happening. We know what do to here, we just haven’t.”

The 30 minute-long event, which was sponsored by the non-profit organization Arizona Security and Prosperity Project and moderated by Pinal County Sheriff Paul Babeu, allowed Fiorina to answer a handful of questions which also touched on gun laws.

“It’s clear that we have the right to bear arms,” she said in a response to a question. Fiorina added that many Democratic Legislators tend to roll out gun control proposals after mass tragedies, such as last Friday’s fatal shooting on Northern Arizona University’s campus, which “would have had nothing to do with preventing tragedies.”

“We have loads of laws (for gun control in regard to violent and mentally ill citizens) on the books, we need to enforce those laws,” she said.

As one final message before she signed off, Fiorina sent Arizona citizens a hopeful message: Don’t give up.

“Don’t give up, you’re not alone,” she said. “People (all around the nation) share your frustration, share your concern, share your hope that we can be better and we will. We need to remember who we are, we never intended to have a professional political class. We need leadership.”

 

 

Related Links