ARIZONA NEWS

Phoenix ties record for longest streak of days at 110 degrees or hotter

Jul 17, 2023, 10:08 AM | Updated: 1:40 pm

Charles Sanders, 59, and his dog Babygirl cool off inside the Justa Center, Friday, July 14, 2023, ...

Charles Sanders, 59, and his dog Babygirl cool off inside the Justa Center, Friday, July 14, 2023, in downtown Phoenix. (AP Photo/Matt York)

(AP Photo/Matt York)

PHOENIX – Phoenix tied a record Monday with its 18th consecutive day reaching at least 110 degrees – and meteorologists don’t see the streak ending anytime soon.

The 110 mark was hit at 12:15 p.m., according to the National Weather Service.

The current hot streak, which is based on daily high temperatures recorded at Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport, started June 30. It matched a record 18-day record dates back to June 1974.

“Looks like we’re going to go into, most likely, 25 days … and probably continuing on past that, too,” Alex Young with the National Weather Service in Phoenix told KTAR News 92.3 FM on Monday morning.

Young said it would be highly unusual for an extreme weather record to be topped by such a large margin.

“I don’t even know how to really put it into words. … It’s one thing to tie a record or break it by one, but it looks like we’re just going to completely shatter it,” he said.

Records pile up as Phoenix heat wave continues

The 110-plus streak isn’t the only record-setting event during the Valley’s unrelenting heat wave.

Phoenix set a record for July 15 when it hit 118 degrees on Saturday, which was the hottest day of the year so far.

Then on Monday, the Phoenix overnight low was a toasty 95 degrees, pushing the streak of daily lows in the 90s to a record eighth consecutive day. The previous mark of seven days was seen twice in 2020 and once in 2012.

A record-long excessive heat warning for the Valley went into effect July 1 and has been extended multiple times. As of Monday, the 17th day of the warning, it was set to run through Friday, but it could be extended again. Previously, the Valley’s longest excessive heat warning ran for 10 days in June 2017.

The National Weather Service has been issuing excessive heat warnings since 2006 as a way to alert communities about potentially dangerous heat. They are based on several parameters, not just temperatures.

How to beat the Arizona heat

Too much time in the Arizona sun can lead to heat exhaustion, heat stroke and death.

Warning signs of heat-related illnesses can include heavy sweating, muscle cramps, weakness, headache and nausea.

Outdoor activities should be curtailed between sunrise and sunset during periods of excessive heat. People should also drink more water than usual and avoid sugary, caffeinated drinks, which dehydrate the body.

Per a city of Phoenix policy implemented to protect hikers and rescue crews, Camelback Mountain’s Echo Canyon and Cholla trails and all Piestewa Peak trails are closed from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. on days with excessive heat warnings.

Dogs aren’t allowed on Phoenix trails when the temperature is in triple digits.

Planning agency Maricopa Association of Governments operates the regional Heat Relief Network annually from May 1 to Sept. 30. The program includes an interactive online map showing the location of more than 200 cooling centers, respite centers, hydration stations and collection sites.

KTAR News 92.3 FM’s Jim Cross contributed to this report.

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Phoenix ties record for longest streak of days at 110 degrees or hotter