As a writer, it’s literally my job to come up with appropriate words and then form them into flowing, cohesive sentences.

But sometimes words are hard and I can be heard asking a colleague for the name of “that thingamajig.”

Honestly, between the multitude of languages the world possesses and the fact we can now basically send messages on our phone using only little pictographs called “emoji,” maybe it’s just easier to say you want “potato sticks” and “porksicles” for dinner.

As a writer, it’s literally my job to come up with appropriate words and then form them into flowing, cohesive sentences.

But sometimes words are hard and I can be heard asking a colleague for the name of “that thingamajig.”

Honestly, between the multitude of languages the world possesses and the fact we can now basically send messages on our phone using only little pictographs called “emoji,” maybe it’s just easier to say you want “potato sticks” and “porksicles” for dinner.

Share this story...
Latest News

Whatchamacallit: Literal descriptions for everyday things

As a writer, it’s literally my job to come up with appropriate words and then form them into flowing, cohesive sentences.

But sometimes words are hard and I can be heard asking a colleague for the name of “that thingamajig.”

Honestly, between the multitude of languages the world possesses and the fact we can now basically send messages on our phone using only little pictographs called “emoji,” maybe it’s just easier to say you want “potato sticks” and “porksicles” for dinner.

The Huffington Post took it upon themselves to help us all out by creating new words for things that aren’t so new, although, honestly, isn’t it easier just to say “cemetery” and “ice cubes”?