What pairs with beetle? Startups seek to make bugs tasty


              Tiziana di Costanzo, co-founder of Horizon Insects, holds up a cup of dried crickets to be ground up and added to pizza dough, in her London kitchen on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Tom Mohan, co-founder of Horizon Insects, holds a handful of Tenebrio molitor larvae, at the company’s London insect farm on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              A bowl of cricket powder is pictured at Horizon Insects in London on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Equipment at Dutch insect farming company Protix’s facility in Bergen Op Zoom, Netherlands, June 28, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Aleks Furtula)
            
              Tiziana di Costanzo, co-founder of Horizon Insects, stirs flour for pizza dough before adding cricket powder, pictured in foreground, in her London kitchen on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Tiziana di Costanzo, co-founder of Horizon Insects, holds up a slice of pizza made with cricket powder, in her London kitchen on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Kees Aarts, CEO of Dutch insect farming company Protix, inspects a tray of black soldier fly larvae at the company’s facility in Bergen Op Zoom, Netherlands, June 28, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Aleks Furtula)
            
              Tom Mohan, co-founder of Horizon Insects, examines a tray of Tenebrio molitor beetles at the company’s London insect farm on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Tom Mohan, co-founder of Horizon Insects, holds a handful of Tenebrio molitor larvae, at the company’s London insect farm on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Tiziana di Costanzo, co-founder of Horizon Insects, holds up a cup of dried crickets to be ground up and added to pizza dough, in her London kitchen on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Tom Mohan, co-founder of Horizon Insects, holds a handful of Tenebrio molitor larvae, at the company’s London insect farm on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              A bowl of cricket powder is pictured at Horizon Insects in London on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Equipment at Dutch insect farming company Protix’s facility in Bergen Op Zoom, Netherlands, June 28, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Aleks Furtula)
            
              Tiziana di Costanzo, co-founder of Horizon Insects, stirs flour for pizza dough before adding cricket powder, pictured in foreground, in her London kitchen on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Tiziana di Costanzo, co-founder of Horizon Insects, holds up a slice of pizza made with cricket powder, in her London kitchen on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Kees Aarts, CEO of Dutch insect farming company Protix, inspects a tray of black soldier fly larvae at the company’s facility in Bergen Op Zoom, Netherlands, June 28, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Aleks Furtula)
            
              Tom Mohan, co-founder of Horizon Insects, examines a tray of Tenebrio molitor beetles at the company’s London insect farm on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Tom Mohan, co-founder of Horizon Insects, holds a handful of Tenebrio molitor larvae, at the company’s London insect farm on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Black soldier fly larva wriggle in a breeding tray at Dutch insect farming company Protix’s facility in Bergen Op Zoom, Netherlands, June 28, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Aleks Furtula)
            
              Tiziana di Costanzo, co-founder of Horizon Insects, holds up a cup of dried crickets to be ground up and added to pizza dough, in her London kitchen on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Tom Mohan, co-founder of Horizon Insects, holds a handful of Tenebrio molitor larvae, at the company’s London insect farm on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              A bowl of cricket powder is pictured at Horizon Insects in London on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Equipment at Dutch insect farming company Protix’s facility in Bergen Op Zoom, Netherlands, June 28, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Aleks Furtula)
            
              Tiziana di Costanzo, co-founder of Horizon Insects, stirs flour for pizza dough before adding cricket powder, pictured in foreground, in her London kitchen on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Tiziana di Costanzo, co-founder of Horizon Insects, holds up a slice of pizza made with cricket powder, in her London kitchen on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Kees Aarts, CEO of Dutch insect farming company Protix, inspects a tray of black soldier fly larvae at the company’s facility in Bergen Op Zoom, Netherlands, June 28, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Aleks Furtula)
            
              Tom Mohan, co-founder of Horizon Insects, examines a tray of Tenebrio molitor beetles at the company’s London insect farm on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Tom Mohan, co-founder of Horizon Insects, holds a handful of Tenebrio molitor larvae, at the company’s London insect farm on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Tiziana di Costanzo, co-founder of Horizon Insects, holds up a cup of dried crickets to be ground up and added to pizza dough, in her London kitchen on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Tom Mohan, co-founder of Horizon Insects, holds a handful of Tenebrio molitor larvae, at the company’s London insect farm on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Tiziana di Costanzo, co-founder of Horizon Insects, holds up a slice of pizza made with cricket powder, in her London kitchen on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Kees Aarts, CEO of Dutch insect farming company Protix, inspects a tray of black soldier fly larvae at the company’s facility in Bergen Op Zoom, Netherlands, June 28, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Aleks Furtula)
            
              Tom Mohan, co-founder of Horizon Insects, holds a handful of Tenebrio molitor larvae, at the company’s London insect farm on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Tiziana di Costanzo, co-founder of Horizon Insects, holds up a cup of dried crickets to be ground up and added to pizza dough, in her London kitchen on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Tom Mohan, co-founder of Horizon Insects, holds a handful of Tenebrio molitor larvae, at the company’s London insect farm on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              A bowl of cricket powder is pictured at Horizon Insects in London on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Tiziana di Costanzo, co-founder of Horizon Insects, holds up a slice of pizza made with cricket powder, in her London kitchen on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Kees Aarts, CEO of Dutch insect farming company Protix, inspects a tray of black soldier fly larvae at the company’s facility in Bergen Op Zoom, Netherlands, June 28, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Aleks Furtula)
            
              Tom Mohan, co-founder of Horizon Insects, holds a handful of Tenebrio molitor larvae, at the company’s London insect farm on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Tiziana di Costanzo, co-founder of Horizon Insects, stirs flour for pizza dough before adding cricket powder, pictured in foreground, in her London kitchen on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Tiziana di Costanzo, co-founder of Horizon Insects, holds up a slice of pizza made with cricket powder, in her London kitchen on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Tiziana di Costanzo, co-founder of Horizon Insects, holds up a slice of pizza made with cricket powder, in her London kitchen on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Kees Aarts, CEO of Dutch insect farming company Protix, inspects a tray of black soldier fly larvae at the company’s facility in Bergen Op Zoom, Netherlands, June 28, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Aleks Furtula)
            
              Tiziana di Costanzo, co-founder of Horizon Insects, holds up a slice of pizza made with cricket powder, in her London kitchen on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Tom Mohan, co-founder of Horizon Insects, holds a handful of Tenebrio molitor larvae, at the company’s London insect farm on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Tiziana di Costanzo, co-founder of Horizon Insects, holds up a cup of dried crickets to be ground up and added to pizza dough, in her London kitchen on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Tom Mohan, co-founder of Horizon Insects, holds a handful of Tenebrio molitor larvae, at the company’s London insect farm on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              A bowl of cricket powder is pictured at Horizon Insects in London on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Equipment at Dutch insect farming company Protix’s facility in Bergen Op Zoom, Netherlands, June 28, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Aleks Furtula)
            
              Tiziana di Costanzo, co-founder of Horizon Insects, holds up a slice of pizza made with cricket powder, in her London kitchen on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Kees Aarts, CEO of Dutch insect farming company Protix, inspects a tray of black soldier fly larvae at the company’s facility in Bergen Op Zoom, Netherlands, June 28, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Aleks Furtula)
            
              Tom Mohan, co-founder of Horizon Insects, holds a handful of Tenebrio molitor larvae, at the company’s London insect farm on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Tiziana di Costanzo, co-founder of Horizon Insects, holds up a cup of dried crickets to be ground up and added to pizza dough, in her London kitchen on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Tiziana di Costanzo, co-founder of Horizon Insects, holds up a cup of dried crickets to be ground up and added to pizza dough, in her London kitchen on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Tom Mohan, co-founder of Horizon Insects, holds a handful of Tenebrio molitor larvae, at the company’s London insect farm on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Tom Mohan, co-founder of Horizon Insects, holds a handful of Tenebrio molitor larvae, at the company’s London insect farm on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              A bowl of cricket powder is pictured at Horizon Insects in London on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Equipment at Dutch insect farming company Protix’s facility in Bergen Op Zoom, Netherlands, June 28, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Aleks Furtula)
            
              Equipment at Dutch insect farming company Protix’s facility in Bergen Op Zoom, Netherlands, June 28, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Aleks Furtula)
            
              Tiziana di Costanzo, co-founder of Horizon Insects, holds up a slice of pizza made with cricket powder, in her London kitchen on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Tiziana di Costanzo, co-founder of Horizon Insects, holds up a slice of pizza made with cricket powder, in her London kitchen on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Kees Aarts, CEO of Dutch insect farming company Protix, inspects a tray of black soldier fly larvae at the company’s facility in Bergen Op Zoom, Netherlands, June 28, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Aleks Furtula)
            
              Kees Aarts, CEO of Dutch insect farming company Protix, inspects a tray of black soldier fly larvae at the company’s facility in Bergen Op Zoom, Netherlands, June 28, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Aleks Furtula)
            
              Tom Mohan, co-founder of Horizon Insects, holds a handful of Tenebrio molitor larvae, at the company’s London insect farm on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Tom Mohan, co-founder of Horizon Insects, holds a handful of Tenebrio molitor larvae, at the company’s London insect farm on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Tiziana di Costanzo, co-founder of Horizon Insects, holds up a cup of dried crickets to be ground up and added to pizza dough, in her London kitchen on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Tom Mohan, co-founder of Horizon Insects, holds a handful of Tenebrio molitor larvae, at the company’s London insect farm on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Tiziana di Costanzo, co-founder of Horizon Insects, holds up a slice of pizza made with cricket powder, in her London kitchen on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Kees Aarts, CEO of Dutch insect farming company Protix, inspects a tray of black soldier fly larvae at the company’s facility in Bergen Op Zoom, Netherlands, June 28, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Aleks Furtula)
            
              Tom Mohan, co-founder of Horizon Insects, examines a tray of Tenebrio molitor beetles at the company’s London insect farm on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Tom Mohan, co-founder of Horizon Insects, holds a handful of Tenebrio molitor larvae, at the company’s London insect farm on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Tom Mohan, co-founder of Horizon Insects, holds a handful of Tenebrio molitor larvae, at the company’s London insect farm on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Tiziana di Costanzo, co-founder of Horizon Insects, stirs flour for pizza dough before adding cricket powder, pictured in foreground, in her London kitchen on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Tiziana di Costanzo, co-founder of Horizon Insects, holds up a slice of pizza made with cricket powder, in her London kitchen on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Kees Aarts, CEO of Dutch insect farming company Protix, inspects a tray of black soldier fly larvae at the company’s facility in Bergen Op Zoom, Netherlands, June 28, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Aleks Furtula)
            
              Tom Mohan, co-founder of Horizon Insects, holds a handful of Tenebrio molitor larvae, at the company’s London insect farm on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Black soldier fly larva wriggle in a breeding tray at Dutch insect farming company Protix’s facility in Bergen Op Zoom, Netherlands, June 28, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Aleks Furtula)
            
              Tiziana di Costanzo, co-founder of Horizon Insects, holds up a cup of dried crickets to be ground up and added to pizza dough, in her London kitchen on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Tom Mohan, co-founder of Horizon Insects, holds a handful of Tenebrio molitor larvae, at the company’s London insect farm on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              A bowl of cricket powder is pictured at Horizon Insects in London on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Tiziana di Costanzo, co-founder of Horizon Insects, stirs flour for pizza dough before adding cricket powder, pictured in foreground, in her London kitchen on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Tiziana di Costanzo, co-founder of Horizon Insects, holds up a slice of pizza made with cricket powder, in her London kitchen on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Kees Aarts, CEO of Dutch insect farming company Protix, inspects a tray of black soldier fly larvae at the company’s facility in Bergen Op Zoom, Netherlands, June 28, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Aleks Furtula)
            
              Tom Mohan, co-founder of Horizon Insects, examines a tray of Tenebrio molitor beetles at the company’s London insect farm on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Tom Mohan, co-founder of Horizon Insects, holds a handful of Tenebrio molitor larvae, at the company’s London insect farm on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Black soldier fly larva wriggle in a breeding tray at Dutch insect farming company Protix’s facility in Bergen Op Zoom, Netherlands, June 28, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Aleks Furtula)
            
              Tiziana di Costanzo, co-founder of Horizon Insects, holds up a cup of dried crickets to be ground up and added to pizza dough, in her London kitchen on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Tom Mohan, co-founder of Horizon Insects, holds a handful of Tenebrio molitor larvae, at the company’s London insect farm on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              A bowl of cricket powder is pictured at Horizon Insects in London on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Equipment at Dutch insect farming company Protix’s facility in Bergen Op Zoom, Netherlands, June 28, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Aleks Furtula)
            
              Tiziana di Costanzo, co-founder of Horizon Insects, holds up a slice of pizza made with cricket powder, in her London kitchen on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Kees Aarts, CEO of Dutch insect farming company Protix, inspects a tray of black soldier fly larvae at the company’s facility in Bergen Op Zoom, Netherlands, June 28, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Aleks Furtula)
            
              Tom Mohan, co-founder of Horizon Insects, examines a tray of Tenebrio molitor beetles at the company’s London insect farm on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Tom Mohan, co-founder of Horizon Insects, holds a handful of Tenebrio molitor larvae, at the company’s London insect farm on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Tiziana di Costanzo, co-founder of Horizon Insects, holds up a cup of dried crickets to be ground up and added to pizza dough, in her London kitchen on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Tom Mohan, co-founder of Horizon Insects, holds a handful of Tenebrio molitor larvae, at the company’s London insect farm on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Tiziana di Costanzo, co-founder of Horizon Insects, stirs flour for pizza dough before adding cricket powder, pictured in foreground, in her London kitchen on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Tiziana di Costanzo, co-founder of Horizon Insects, holds up a slice of pizza made with cricket powder, in her London kitchen on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Kees Aarts, CEO of Dutch insect farming company Protix, inspects a tray of black soldier fly larvae at the company’s facility in Bergen Op Zoom, Netherlands, June 28, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Aleks Furtula)
            
              Tom Mohan, co-founder of Horizon Insects, examines a tray of Tenebrio molitor beetles at the company’s London insect farm on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Tom Mohan, co-founder of Horizon Insects, holds a handful of Tenebrio molitor larvae, at the company’s London insect farm on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Tiziana di Costanzo, co-founder of Horizon Insects, holds up a slice of pizza made with cricket powder, in her London kitchen on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Tom Mohan, co-founder of Horizon Insects, examines a tray of Tenebrio molitor beetles at the company’s London insect farm on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Tom Mohan, co-founder of Horizon Insects, holds a handful of Tenebrio molitor larvae, at the company’s London insect farm on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Tom Mohan, co-founder of Horizon Insects, holds a handful of Tenebrio molitor larvae, at the company’s London insect farm on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Tiziana di Costanzo, co-founder of Horizon Insects, stirs flour for pizza dough before adding cricket powder, pictured in foreground, in her London kitchen on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Tiziana di Costanzo, co-founder of Horizon Insects, holds up a slice of pizza made with cricket powder, in her London kitchen on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Tom Mohan, co-founder of Horizon Insects, holds a handful of Tenebrio molitor larvae, at the company’s London insect farm on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Tiziana di Costanzo, co-founder of Horizon Insects, holds up a cup of dried crickets to be ground up and added to pizza dough, in her London kitchen on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Tom Mohan, co-founder of Horizon Insects, holds a handful of Tenebrio molitor larvae, at the company’s London insect farm on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Tiziana di Costanzo, co-founder of Horizon Insects, holds up a slice of pizza made with cricket powder, in her London kitchen on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Tom Mohan, co-founder of Horizon Insects, holds a handful of Tenebrio molitor larvae, at the company’s London insect farm on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Tiziana di Costanzo, co-founder of Horizon Insects, holds up a slice of pizza made with cricket powder, in her London kitchen on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Tom Mohan, co-founder of Horizon Insects, holds a handful of Tenebrio molitor larvae, at the company’s London insect farm on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Tom Mohan, co-founder of Horizon Insects, holds a handful of Tenebrio molitor larvae, at the company’s London insect farm on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Equipment at Dutch insect farming company Protix’s facility in Bergen Op Zoom, Netherlands, June 28, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Aleks Furtula)
            
              Equipment at Dutch insect farming company Protix’s facility in Bergen Op Zoom, Netherlands, June 28, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Aleks Furtula)
            
              Tiziana di Costanzo, co-founder of Horizon Insects, holds up a slice of pizza made with cricket powder, in her London kitchen on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Tiziana di Costanzo, co-founder of Horizon Insects, holds up a slice of pizza made with cricket powder, in her London kitchen on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Kees Aarts, CEO of Dutch insect farming company Protix, inspects a tray of black soldier fly larvae at the company’s facility in Bergen Op Zoom, Netherlands, June 28, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Aleks Furtula)
            
              Kees Aarts, CEO of Dutch insect farming company Protix, inspects a tray of black soldier fly larvae at the company’s facility in Bergen Op Zoom, Netherlands, June 28, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Aleks Furtula)
            
              Tom Mohan, co-founder of Horizon Insects, examines a tray of Tenebrio molitor beetles at the company’s London insect farm on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Tom Mohan, co-founder of Horizon Insects, examines a tray of Tenebrio molitor beetles at the company’s London insect farm on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Tom Mohan, co-founder of Horizon Insects, holds a handful of Tenebrio molitor larvae, at the company’s London insect farm on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Tom Mohan, co-founder of Horizon Insects, holds a handful of Tenebrio molitor larvae, at the company’s London insect farm on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Tiziana di Costanzo, co-founder of Horizon Insects, holds up a slice of pizza made with cricket powder, in her London kitchen on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Tom Mohan, co-founder of Horizon Insects, holds a handful of Tenebrio molitor larvae, at the company’s London insect farm on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Tom Mohan, co-founder of Horizon Insects, holds a handful of Tenebrio molitor larvae, at the company’s London insect farm on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Kees Aarts, CEO of Dutch insect farming company Protix, inspects a tray of black soldier fly larvae at the company’s facility in Bergen Op Zoom, Netherlands, June 28, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Aleks Furtula)
            
              Tom Mohan, co-founder of Horizon Insects, holds a handful of Tenebrio molitor larvae, at the company’s London insect farm on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)
            
              Tom Mohan, co-founder of Horizon Insects, holds a handful of Tenebrio molitor larvae, at the company’s London insect farm on June 2, 2021. While insects are commonly eaten in parts of Asia and Africa, they're increasingly seen as a viable food source in the West as Earth’s growing population puts more pressure on global food production. Experts say they’re rich in protein, yet can be raised much more sustainably than beef or pork. Regulatory change has also made things easier for European companies looking to market insects directly to consumers. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)