Webb Space Telescope spots early galaxies hidden from Hubble


              This combination image provided by NASA on Wednesday, Oct. 19, 2022, shows the Pillars of Creation as imaged by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope in 2014, left, and by NASA's James Webb Telescope, right. The new, near-infrared-light view from the James Webb Space Telescope helps us peer through more of the dust in the star-forming region, according to NASA. (NASA, ESA, CSA, STScI via AP)
            
              This image released by NASA on Wednesday, Oct. 19, 2022, shows the Pillars of Creation, captured by the James Webb Space Telescope in near-infrared-light view. (NASA, ESA, CSA, STScI via AP)
            
              This image made available by the Space Telescope Science Institute on Wednesday, Nov. 16, 2022, shows a protostar within the dark cloud L1527 embedded within a cloud of material feeding its growth, captured by the James Webb Space Telescope. Ejections from the star have cleared out cavities above and below it, whose boundaries glow orange and blue in this infrared view. The region at lower right appears blue, as there's less dust between it and Webb than the orange regions above it. (NASA, ESA, CSA, STScI, Joseph DePasquale (STScI), Alyssa Pagan (STScI), Anton M. Koekemoer (STScI) via AP)
            
              This image made available by the Space Telescope Science Institute on Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, shows two of the farthest galaxies seen to date captured by the James Webb Space Telescope in the outer regions of the giant galaxy cluster Abell 2744. The galaxies are not inside the cluster, but many billions of light-years farther behind it. The galaxy labeled "1" existed only 450 million years after the big bang. The galaxy labeled "2" existed 350 million years after the big bang. (NASA, ESA, CSA, Tommaso Treu (UCLA), Zolt G. Levay (STScI) via AP)