War shakes Europe path to energy independence, climate goals


              FILE - Steam and smoke rise from power plant located by the Turow lignite coal mine near the town of Bogatynia, Poland, Jan. 15, 2022. To wean itself from Russian energy supplies as quickly as possible, Europe will need to burn more coal and build more pipelines and terminals to import fossil fuels from elsewhere. (AP Photo/Petr David Josek, File)
            
              FILE - Cars and trucks driving on a highway in Frankfurt, Germany, early Monday, March 21, 2022. While some are calling for an immediate boycott of all Russian oil and gas amid the war in Ukraine, the EU plans to reduce Russian gas imports by two-thirds by the end of this year, and to eliminate them altogether before 2030.  (AP Photo/Michael Probst, File)
            
              FILE - Steam from a BP oil refinery rises behind homes in Gelsenkirchen, Germany, Nov. 5, 2021. Before the war in Ukraine, Europe's most pressing energy policy goal was reducing carbon emissions that cause climate change. Now, officials are fixated on rapidly reducing the continent's reliance on Russian oil and natural gas — and that means friction between security and climate goals, at least in the short term. (AP Photo/Martin Meissner)
            
              Chief executive Alex Melzer of German solar energy company Zolar poses for a photo in Berlin, Germany, Tuesday, March 22, 2022. "With the Ukraine crisis, we've really seen that people are wondering whether Germany is going to stop buying oil and gas from Russia and what's going to happen to our electricity and energy system," Melzer told The Associated Press. (AP Photo/Markus Schreiber)
            
              FILE - A pumpjack extracts crude at an oil field in Emlichheim, Germany, March 18, 2022. Before the war in Ukraine, Europe's most pressing energy policy goal was reducing carbon emissions that cause climate change. Now, officials are fixated on rapidly reducing the continent's reliance on Russian oil and natural gas — and that means friction between security and climate goals, at least in the short term. (AP Photo/Martin Meissner)