US regulators to vote on largest dam demolition in history


              In this photo provided by Frankie Myers, members of the Yurok, Karuk and Hoopa Valley tribes and their supporters gather on a sand bar in the Klamath River near Orleans, Calif., to watch the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission meeting by satellite uplink on the fate of four dams on the lower Klamath River, Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022. Federal regulators unanimously approved a plan to decommission and demolish the dams in the largest dam demolition project in U.S. history. (Frankie Myers/Yurok Tribe via AP)
            
              In this photo provided by Frankie Myers, members of the Yurok, Karuk and Hoopa Valley tribes and their supporters gather on a sand bar in the Klamath River near Orleans, Calif., to watch the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission meeting by satellite uplink on the fate of four dams on the lower Klamath River, Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022. Federal regulators unanimously approved a plan to decommission and demolish the dams in the largest dam demolition project in U.S. history. (Frankie Myers/Yurok Tribe via AP)
            
              FILE - Jamie Holt, lead fisheries technician for the Yurok Tribe, right, and Gilbert Myers count dead chinook salmon pulled from a trap in the lower Klamath River on June 8, 2021, in Weitchpec, Calif. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. Several tribes in the region, including the Yurok, have been fighting for years to see the dams come down to aid the recovery of struggling salmon populations. (AP Photo/Nathan Howard, File)
            
              FILE - The Klamath River winds runs along Highway 96 on June 7, 2021, near Happy Camp, Calif. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. The vote by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on the lower Klamath River dams is the last major regulatory hurdle and the biggest milestone facing a $500 million demolition proposal championed by Native American tribes and environmentalists for years. (AP Photo/Nathan Howard, File)
            
              FILE - The Iron Gate Dam, powerhouse and spillway is seen on the lower Klamath River near Hornbrook, Calif, on March 3, 2020. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus, File)
            
              In this photo provided by Frankie Myers, members of the Yurok, Karuk and Hoopa Valley tribes and their supporters gather on a sand bar in the Klamath River near Orleans, Calif., to watch the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission meeting by satellite uplink on the fate of four dams on the lower Klamath River, Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022. Federal regulators unanimously approved a plan to decommission and demolish the dams in the largest dam demolition project in U.S. history. (Frankie Myers/Yurok Tribe via AP)
            
              In this photo provided by Frankie Myers, members of the Yurok, Karuk and Hoopa Valley tribes and their supporters gather on a sand bar in the Klamath River near Orleans, Calif., to watch the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission meeting by satellite uplink on the fate of four dams on the lower Klamath River, Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022. Federal regulators unanimously approved a plan to decommission and demolish the dams in the largest dam demolition project in U.S. history. (Frankie Myers/Yurok Tribe via AP)
            
              FILE - Jamie Holt, lead fisheries technician for the Yurok Tribe, right, and Gilbert Myers count dead chinook salmon pulled from a trap in the lower Klamath River on June 8, 2021, in Weitchpec, Calif. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. Several tribes in the region, including the Yurok, have been fighting for years to see the dams come down to aid the recovery of struggling salmon populations. (AP Photo/Nathan Howard, File)
            
              FILE - The Klamath River winds runs along Highway 96 on June 7, 2021, near Happy Camp, Calif. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. The vote by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on the lower Klamath River dams is the last major regulatory hurdle and the biggest milestone facing a $500 million demolition proposal championed by Native American tribes and environmentalists for years. (AP Photo/Nathan Howard, File)
            
              FILE - The Iron Gate Dam, powerhouse and spillway is seen on the lower Klamath River near Hornbrook, Calif, on March 3, 2020. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus, File)
            
              In this photo provided by Frankie Myers, members of the Yurok, Karuk and Hoopa Valley tribes and their supporters gather on a sand bar in the Klamath River near Orleans, Calif., to watch the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission meeting by satellite uplink on the fate of four dams on the lower Klamath River, Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022. Federal regulators unanimously approved a plan to decommission and demolish the dams in the largest dam demolition project in U.S. history. (Frankie Myers/Yurok Tribe via AP)
            
              FILE - Jamie Holt, lead fisheries technician for the Yurok Tribe, right, and Gilbert Myers count dead chinook salmon pulled from a trap in the lower Klamath River on June 8, 2021, in Weitchpec, Calif. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. Several tribes in the region, including the Yurok, have been fighting for years to see the dams come down to aid the recovery of struggling salmon populations. (AP Photo/Nathan Howard, File)
            
              FILE - The Klamath River winds runs along Highway 96 on June 7, 2021, near Happy Camp, Calif. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. The vote by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on the lower Klamath River dams is the last major regulatory hurdle and the biggest milestone facing a $500 million demolition proposal championed by Native American tribes and environmentalists for years. (AP Photo/Nathan Howard, File)
            
              In this photo provided by Frankie Myers, members of the Yurok, Karuk and Hoopa Valley tribes and their supporters gather on a sand bar in the Klamath River near Orleans, Calif., to watch the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission meeting by satellite uplink on the fate of four dams on the lower Klamath River, Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022. Federal regulators unanimously approved a plan to decommission and demolish the dams in the largest dam demolition project in U.S. history. (Frankie Myers/Yurok Tribe via AP)
            
              FILE - The Iron Gate Dam, powerhouse and spillway is seen on the lower Klamath River near Hornbrook, Calif, on March 3, 2020. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus, File)
            
              FILE - Jamie Holt, lead fisheries technician for the Yurok Tribe, right, and Gilbert Myers count dead chinook salmon pulled from a trap in the lower Klamath River on June 8, 2021, in Weitchpec, Calif. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. Several tribes in the region, including the Yurok, have been fighting for years to see the dams come down to aid the recovery of struggling salmon populations. (AP Photo/Nathan Howard, File)
            
              FILE - The Klamath River winds runs along Highway 96 on June 7, 2021, near Happy Camp, Calif. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. The vote by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on the lower Klamath River dams is the last major regulatory hurdle and the biggest milestone facing a $500 million demolition proposal championed by Native American tribes and environmentalists for years. (AP Photo/Nathan Howard, File)
            
              FILE - The Iron Gate Dam, powerhouse and spillway is seen on the lower Klamath River near Hornbrook, Calif, on March 3, 2020. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus, File)
            
              In this photo provided by Frankie Myers, members of the Yurok, Karuk and Hoopa Valley tribes and their supporters gather on a sand bar in the Klamath River near Orleans, Calif., to watch the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission meeting by satellite uplink on the fate of four dams on the lower Klamath River, Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022. Federal regulators unanimously approved a plan to decommission and demolish the dams in the largest dam demolition project in U.S. history. (Frankie Myers/Yurok Tribe via AP)
            
              FILE - Jamie Holt, lead fisheries technician for the Yurok Tribe, right, and Gilbert Myers count dead chinook salmon pulled from a trap in the lower Klamath River on June 8, 2021, in Weitchpec, Calif. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. Several tribes in the region, including the Yurok, have been fighting for years to see the dams come down to aid the recovery of struggling salmon populations. (AP Photo/Nathan Howard, File)
            
              FILE - The Iron Gate Dam, powerhouse and spillway is seen on the lower Klamath River near Hornbrook, Calif, on March 3, 2020. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus, File)
            
              In this photo provided by Frankie Myers, members of the Yurok, Karuk and Hoopa Valley tribes and their supporters gather on a sand bar in the Klamath River near Orleans, Calif., to watch the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission meeting by satellite uplink on the fate of four dams on the lower Klamath River, Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022. Federal regulators unanimously approved a plan to decommission and demolish the dams in the largest dam demolition project in U.S. history. (Frankie Myers/Yurok Tribe via AP)
            
              In this photo provided by Frankie Myers, members of the Yurok, Karuk and Hoopa Valley tribes and their supporters gather on a sand bar in the Klamath River near Orleans, Calif., to watch the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission meeting by satellite uplink on the fate of four dams on the lower Klamath River, Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022. Federal regulators unanimously approved a plan to decommission and demolish the dams in the largest dam demolition project in U.S. history. (Frankie Myers/Yurok Tribe via AP)
            
              FILE - Jamie Holt, lead fisheries technician for the Yurok Tribe, right, and Gilbert Myers count dead chinook salmon pulled from a trap in the lower Klamath River on June 8, 2021, in Weitchpec, Calif. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. Several tribes in the region, including the Yurok, have been fighting for years to see the dams come down to aid the recovery of struggling salmon populations. (AP Photo/Nathan Howard, File)
            
              FILE - The Klamath River winds runs along Highway 96 on June 7, 2021, near Happy Camp, Calif. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. The vote by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on the lower Klamath River dams is the last major regulatory hurdle and the biggest milestone facing a $500 million demolition proposal championed by Native American tribes and environmentalists for years. (AP Photo/Nathan Howard, File)
            
              In this photo provided by Frankie Myers, members of the Yurok, Karuk and Hoopa Valley tribes and their supporters gather on a sand bar in the Klamath River near Orleans, Calif., to watch the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission meeting by satellite uplink on the fate of four dams on the lower Klamath River, Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022. Federal regulators unanimously approved a plan to decommission and demolish the dams in the largest dam demolition project in U.S. history. (Frankie Myers/Yurok Tribe via AP)
            
              In this photo provided by Frankie Myers, members of the Yurok, Karuk and Hoopa Valley tribes and their supporters gather on a sand bar in the Klamath River near Orleans, Calif., to watch the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission meeting by satellite uplink on the fate of four dams on the lower Klamath River, Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022. Federal regulators unanimously approved a plan to decommission and demolish the dams in the largest dam demolition project in U.S. history. (Frankie Myers/Yurok Tribe via AP)
            
              FILE - The Klamath River winds runs along Highway 96 on June 7, 2021, near Happy Camp, Calif. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. The vote by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on the lower Klamath River dams is the last major regulatory hurdle and the biggest milestone facing a $500 million demolition proposal championed by Native American tribes and environmentalists for years. (AP Photo/Nathan Howard, File)
            
              FILE - The Iron Gate Dam, powerhouse and spillway is seen on the lower Klamath River near Hornbrook, Calif, on March 3, 2020. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus, File)
            
              In this photo provided by Frankie Myers, members of the Yurok, Karuk and Hoopa Valley tribes and their supporters gather on a sand bar in the Klamath River near Orleans, Calif., to watch the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission meeting by satellite uplink on the fate of four dams on the lower Klamath River, Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022. Federal regulators unanimously approved a plan to decommission and demolish the dams in the largest dam demolition project in U.S. history. (Frankie Myers/Yurok Tribe via AP)
            
              FILE - Jamie Holt, lead fisheries technician for the Yurok Tribe, right, and Gilbert Myers count dead chinook salmon pulled from a trap in the lower Klamath River on June 8, 2021, in Weitchpec, Calif. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. Several tribes in the region, including the Yurok, have been fighting for years to see the dams come down to aid the recovery of struggling salmon populations. (AP Photo/Nathan Howard, File)
            
              FILE - The Klamath River winds runs along Highway 96 on June 7, 2021, near Happy Camp, Calif. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. The vote by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on the lower Klamath River dams is the last major regulatory hurdle and the biggest milestone facing a $500 million demolition proposal championed by Native American tribes and environmentalists for years. (AP Photo/Nathan Howard, File)
            
              FILE - The Iron Gate Dam, powerhouse and spillway is seen on the lower Klamath River near Hornbrook, Calif, on March 3, 2020. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus, File)
            
              In this photo provided by Frankie Myers, members of the Yurok, Karuk and Hoopa Valley tribes and their supporters gather on a sand bar in the Klamath River near Orleans, Calif., to watch the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission meeting by satellite uplink on the fate of four dams on the lower Klamath River, Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022. Federal regulators unanimously approved a plan to decommission and demolish the dams in the largest dam demolition project in U.S. history. (Frankie Myers/Yurok Tribe via AP)
            
              In this photo provided by Frankie Myers, members of the Yurok, Karuk and Hoopa Valley tribes and their supporters gather on a sand bar in the Klamath River near Orleans, Calif., to watch the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission meeting by satellite uplink on the fate of four dams on the lower Klamath River, Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022. Federal regulators unanimously approved a plan to decommission and demolish the dams in the largest dam demolition project in U.S. history. (Frankie Myers/Yurok Tribe via AP)
            
              FILE - Jamie Holt, lead fisheries technician for the Yurok Tribe, right, and Gilbert Myers count dead chinook salmon pulled from a trap in the lower Klamath River on June 8, 2021, in Weitchpec, Calif. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. Several tribes in the region, including the Yurok, have been fighting for years to see the dams come down to aid the recovery of struggling salmon populations. (AP Photo/Nathan Howard, File)
            
              FILE - The Klamath River winds runs along Highway 96 on June 7, 2021, near Happy Camp, Calif. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. The vote by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on the lower Klamath River dams is the last major regulatory hurdle and the biggest milestone facing a $500 million demolition proposal championed by Native American tribes and environmentalists for years. (AP Photo/Nathan Howard, File)
            
              FILE - The Iron Gate Dam, powerhouse and spillway is seen on the lower Klamath River near Hornbrook, Calif, on March 3, 2020. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus, File)
            
              In this photo provided by Frankie Myers, members of the Yurok, Karuk and Hoopa Valley tribes and their supporters gather on a sand bar in the Klamath River near Orleans, Calif., to watch the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission meeting by satellite uplink on the fate of four dams on the lower Klamath River, Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022. Federal regulators unanimously approved a plan to decommission and demolish the dams in the largest dam demolition project in U.S. history. (Frankie Myers/Yurok Tribe via AP)
            
              In this photo provided by Frankie Myers, members of the Yurok, Karuk and Hoopa Valley tribes and their supporters gather on a sand bar in the Klamath River near Orleans, Calif., to watch the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission meeting by satellite uplink on the fate of four dams on the lower Klamath River, Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022. Federal regulators unanimously approved a plan to decommission and demolish the dams in the largest dam demolition project in U.S. history. (Frankie Myers/Yurok Tribe via AP)
            
              FILE - Jamie Holt, lead fisheries technician for the Yurok Tribe, right, and Gilbert Myers count dead chinook salmon pulled from a trap in the lower Klamath River on June 8, 2021, in Weitchpec, Calif. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. Several tribes in the region, including the Yurok, have been fighting for years to see the dams come down to aid the recovery of struggling salmon populations. (AP Photo/Nathan Howard, File)
            
              FILE - The Klamath River winds runs along Highway 96 on June 7, 2021, near Happy Camp, Calif. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. The vote by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on the lower Klamath River dams is the last major regulatory hurdle and the biggest milestone facing a $500 million demolition proposal championed by Native American tribes and environmentalists for years. (AP Photo/Nathan Howard, File)
            
              FILE - The Iron Gate Dam, powerhouse and spillway is seen on the lower Klamath River near Hornbrook, Calif, on March 3, 2020. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus, File)
            
              In this photo provided by Frankie Myers, members of the Yurok, Karuk and Hoopa Valley tribes and their supporters gather on a sand bar in the Klamath River near Orleans, Calif., to watch the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission meeting by satellite uplink on the fate of four dams on the lower Klamath River, Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022. Federal regulators unanimously approved a plan to decommission and demolish the dams in the largest dam demolition project in U.S. history. (Frankie Myers/Yurok Tribe via AP)
            
              In this photo provided by Frankie Myers, members of the Yurok, Karuk and Hoopa Valley tribes and their supporters gather on a sand bar in the Klamath River near Orleans, Calif., to watch the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission meeting by satellite uplink on the fate of four dams on the lower Klamath River, Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022. Federal regulators unanimously approved a plan to decommission and demolish the dams in the largest dam demolition project in U.S. history. (Frankie Myers/Yurok Tribe via AP)
            
              FILE - Jamie Holt, lead fisheries technician for the Yurok Tribe, right, and Gilbert Myers count dead chinook salmon pulled from a trap in the lower Klamath River on June 8, 2021, in Weitchpec, Calif. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. Several tribes in the region, including the Yurok, have been fighting for years to see the dams come down to aid the recovery of struggling salmon populations. (AP Photo/Nathan Howard, File)
            
              FILE - The Klamath River winds runs along Highway 96 on June 7, 2021, near Happy Camp, Calif. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. The vote by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on the lower Klamath River dams is the last major regulatory hurdle and the biggest milestone facing a $500 million demolition proposal championed by Native American tribes and environmentalists for years. (AP Photo/Nathan Howard, File)
            
              FILE - The Iron Gate Dam, powerhouse and spillway is seen on the lower Klamath River near Hornbrook, Calif, on March 3, 2020. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus, File)
            
              FILE - Jamie Holt, lead fisheries technician for the Yurok Tribe, right, and Gilbert Myers count dead chinook salmon pulled from a trap in the lower Klamath River on June 8, 2021, in Weitchpec, Calif. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. Several tribes in the region, including the Yurok, have been fighting for years to see the dams come down to aid the recovery of struggling salmon populations. (AP Photo/Nathan Howard, File)
            
              FILE - The Klamath River winds runs along Highway 96 on June 7, 2021, near Happy Camp, Calif. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. The vote by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on the lower Klamath River dams is the last major regulatory hurdle and the biggest milestone facing a $500 million demolition proposal championed by Native American tribes and environmentalists for years. (AP Photo/Nathan Howard, File)
            
              In this photo provided by Frankie Myers, members of the Yurok, Karuk and Hoopa Valley tribes and their supporters gather on a sand bar in the Klamath River near Orleans, Calif., to watch the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission meeting by satellite uplink on the fate of four dams on the lower Klamath River, Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022. Federal regulators unanimously approved a plan to decommission and demolish the dams in the largest dam demolition project in U.S. history. (Frankie Myers/Yurok Tribe via AP)
            
              In this photo provided by Frankie Myers, members of the Yurok, Karuk and Hoopa Valley tribes and their supporters gather on a sand bar in the Klamath River near Orleans, Calif., to watch the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission meeting by satellite uplink on the fate of four dams on the lower Klamath River, Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022. Federal regulators unanimously approved a plan to decommission and demolish the dams in the largest dam demolition project in U.S. history. (Frankie Myers/Yurok Tribe via AP)
            
              FILE - Jamie Holt, lead fisheries technician for the Yurok Tribe, right, and Gilbert Myers count dead chinook salmon pulled from a trap in the lower Klamath River on June 8, 2021, in Weitchpec, Calif. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. Several tribes in the region, including the Yurok, have been fighting for years to see the dams come down to aid the recovery of struggling salmon populations. (AP Photo/Nathan Howard, File)
            
              FILE - The Klamath River winds runs along Highway 96 on June 7, 2021, near Happy Camp, Calif. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. The vote by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on the lower Klamath River dams is the last major regulatory hurdle and the biggest milestone facing a $500 million demolition proposal championed by Native American tribes and environmentalists for years. (AP Photo/Nathan Howard, File)
            
              FILE - The Iron Gate Dam, powerhouse and spillway is seen on the lower Klamath River near Hornbrook, Calif, on March 3, 2020. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus, File)
            
              In this photo provided by Frankie Myers, members of the Yurok, Karuk and Hoopa Valley tribes and their supporters gather on a sand bar in the Klamath River near Orleans, Calif., to watch the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission meeting by satellite uplink on the fate of four dams on the lower Klamath River, Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022. Federal regulators unanimously approved a plan to decommission and demolish the dams in the largest dam demolition project in U.S. history. (Frankie Myers/Yurok Tribe via AP)
            
              In this photo provided by Frankie Myers, members of the Yurok, Karuk and Hoopa Valley tribes and their supporters gather on a sand bar in the Klamath River near Orleans, Calif., to watch the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission meeting by satellite uplink on the fate of four dams on the lower Klamath River, Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022. Federal regulators unanimously approved a plan to decommission and demolish the dams in the largest dam demolition project in U.S. history. (Frankie Myers/Yurok Tribe via AP)
            
              FILE - Jamie Holt, lead fisheries technician for the Yurok Tribe, right, and Gilbert Myers count dead chinook salmon pulled from a trap in the lower Klamath River on June 8, 2021, in Weitchpec, Calif. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. Several tribes in the region, including the Yurok, have been fighting for years to see the dams come down to aid the recovery of struggling salmon populations. (AP Photo/Nathan Howard, File)
            
              FILE - The Klamath River winds runs along Highway 96 on June 7, 2021, near Happy Camp, Calif. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. The vote by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on the lower Klamath River dams is the last major regulatory hurdle and the biggest milestone facing a $500 million demolition proposal championed by Native American tribes and environmentalists for years. (AP Photo/Nathan Howard, File)
            
              FILE - The Iron Gate Dam, powerhouse and spillway is seen on the lower Klamath River near Hornbrook, Calif, on March 3, 2020. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus, File)
            
              In this photo provided by Frankie Myers, members of the Yurok, Karuk and Hoopa Valley tribes and their supporters gather on a sand bar in the Klamath River near Orleans, Calif., to watch the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission meeting by satellite uplink on the fate of four dams on the lower Klamath River, Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022. Federal regulators unanimously approved a plan to decommission and demolish the dams in the largest dam demolition project in U.S. history. (Frankie Myers/Yurok Tribe via AP)
            
              In this photo provided by Frankie Myers, members of the Yurok, Karuk and Hoopa Valley tribes and their supporters gather on a sand bar in the Klamath River near Orleans, Calif., to watch the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission meeting by satellite uplink on the fate of four dams on the lower Klamath River, Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022. Federal regulators unanimously approved a plan to decommission and demolish the dams in the largest dam demolition project in U.S. history. (Frankie Myers/Yurok Tribe via AP)
            
              FILE - Jamie Holt, lead fisheries technician for the Yurok Tribe, right, and Gilbert Myers count dead chinook salmon pulled from a trap in the lower Klamath River on June 8, 2021, in Weitchpec, Calif. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. Several tribes in the region, including the Yurok, have been fighting for years to see the dams come down to aid the recovery of struggling salmon populations. (AP Photo/Nathan Howard, File)
            
              FILE - The Klamath River winds runs along Highway 96 on June 7, 2021, near Happy Camp, Calif. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. The vote by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on the lower Klamath River dams is the last major regulatory hurdle and the biggest milestone facing a $500 million demolition proposal championed by Native American tribes and environmentalists for years. (AP Photo/Nathan Howard, File)
            
              FILE - The Iron Gate Dam, powerhouse and spillway is seen on the lower Klamath River near Hornbrook, Calif, on March 3, 2020. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus, File)
            
              In this photo provided by Frankie Myers, members of the Yurok, Karuk and Hoopa Valley tribes and their supporters gather on a sand bar in the Klamath River near Orleans, Calif., to watch the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission meeting by satellite uplink on the fate of four dams on the lower Klamath River, Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022. Federal regulators unanimously approved a plan to decommission and demolish the dams in the largest dam demolition project in U.S. history. (Frankie Myers/Yurok Tribe via AP)
            
              In this photo provided by Frankie Myers, members of the Yurok, Karuk and Hoopa Valley tribes and their supporters gather on a sand bar in the Klamath River near Orleans, Calif., to watch the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission meeting by satellite uplink on the fate of four dams on the lower Klamath River, Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022. Federal regulators unanimously approved a plan to decommission and demolish the dams in the largest dam demolition project in U.S. history. (Frankie Myers/Yurok Tribe via AP)
            
              FILE - Jamie Holt, lead fisheries technician for the Yurok Tribe, right, and Gilbert Myers count dead chinook salmon pulled from a trap in the lower Klamath River on June 8, 2021, in Weitchpec, Calif. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. Several tribes in the region, including the Yurok, have been fighting for years to see the dams come down to aid the recovery of struggling salmon populations. (AP Photo/Nathan Howard, File)
            
              FILE - The Klamath River winds runs along Highway 96 on June 7, 2021, near Happy Camp, Calif. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. The vote by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on the lower Klamath River dams is the last major regulatory hurdle and the biggest milestone facing a $500 million demolition proposal championed by Native American tribes and environmentalists for years. (AP Photo/Nathan Howard, File)
            
              FILE - The Iron Gate Dam, powerhouse and spillway is seen on the lower Klamath River near Hornbrook, Calif, on March 3, 2020. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus, File)
            
              In this photo provided by Frankie Myers, members of the Yurok, Karuk and Hoopa Valley tribes and their supporters gather on a sand bar in the Klamath River near Orleans, Calif., to watch the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission meeting by satellite uplink on the fate of four dams on the lower Klamath River, Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022. Federal regulators unanimously approved a plan to decommission and demolish the dams in the largest dam demolition project in U.S. history. (Frankie Myers/Yurok Tribe via AP)
            
              In this photo provided by Frankie Myers, members of the Yurok, Karuk and Hoopa Valley tribes and their supporters gather on a sand bar in the Klamath River near Orleans, Calif., to watch the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission meeting by satellite uplink on the fate of four dams on the lower Klamath River, Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022. Federal regulators unanimously approved a plan to decommission and demolish the dams in the largest dam demolition project in U.S. history. (Frankie Myers/Yurok Tribe via AP)
            
              FILE - Jamie Holt, lead fisheries technician for the Yurok Tribe, right, and Gilbert Myers count dead chinook salmon pulled from a trap in the lower Klamath River on June 8, 2021, in Weitchpec, Calif. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. Several tribes in the region, including the Yurok, have been fighting for years to see the dams come down to aid the recovery of struggling salmon populations. (AP Photo/Nathan Howard, File)
            
              FILE - The Klamath River winds runs along Highway 96 on June 7, 2021, near Happy Camp, Calif. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. The vote by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on the lower Klamath River dams is the last major regulatory hurdle and the biggest milestone facing a $500 million demolition proposal championed by Native American tribes and environmentalists for years. (AP Photo/Nathan Howard, File)
            
              FILE - The Iron Gate Dam, powerhouse and spillway is seen on the lower Klamath River near Hornbrook, Calif, on March 3, 2020. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus, File)
            
              In this photo provided by Frankie Myers, members of the Yurok, Karuk and Hoopa Valley tribes and their supporters gather on a sand bar in the Klamath River near Orleans, Calif., to watch the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission meeting by satellite uplink on the fate of four dams on the lower Klamath River, Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022. Federal regulators unanimously approved a plan to decommission and demolish the dams in the largest dam demolition project in U.S. history. (Frankie Myers/Yurok Tribe via AP)
            
              In this photo provided by Frankie Myers, members of the Yurok, Karuk and Hoopa Valley tribes and their supporters gather on a sand bar in the Klamath River near Orleans, Calif., to watch the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission meeting by satellite uplink on the fate of four dams on the lower Klamath River, Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022. Federal regulators unanimously approved a plan to decommission and demolish the dams in the largest dam demolition project in U.S. history. (Frankie Myers/Yurok Tribe via AP)
            
              FILE - Jamie Holt, lead fisheries technician for the Yurok Tribe, right, and Gilbert Myers count dead chinook salmon pulled from a trap in the lower Klamath River on June 8, 2021, in Weitchpec, Calif. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. Several tribes in the region, including the Yurok, have been fighting for years to see the dams come down to aid the recovery of struggling salmon populations. (AP Photo/Nathan Howard, File)
            
              FILE - The Klamath River winds runs along Highway 96 on June 7, 2021, near Happy Camp, Calif. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. The vote by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on the lower Klamath River dams is the last major regulatory hurdle and the biggest milestone facing a $500 million demolition proposal championed by Native American tribes and environmentalists for years. (AP Photo/Nathan Howard, File)
            
              FILE - The Iron Gate Dam, powerhouse and spillway is seen on the lower Klamath River near Hornbrook, Calif, on March 3, 2020. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus, File)
            
              In this photo provided by Frankie Myers, members of the Yurok, Karuk and Hoopa Valley tribes and their supporters gather on a sand bar in the Klamath River near Orleans, Calif., to watch the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission meeting by satellite uplink on the fate of four dams on the lower Klamath River, Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022. Federal regulators unanimously approved a plan to decommission and demolish the dams in the largest dam demolition project in U.S. history. (Frankie Myers/Yurok Tribe via AP)
            
              In this photo provided by Frankie Myers, members of the Yurok, Karuk and Hoopa Valley tribes and their supporters gather on a sand bar in the Klamath River near Orleans, Calif., to watch the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission meeting by satellite uplink on the fate of four dams on the lower Klamath River, Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022. Federal regulators unanimously approved a plan to decommission and demolish the dams in the largest dam demolition project in U.S. history. (Frankie Myers/Yurok Tribe via AP)
            
              FILE - Jamie Holt, lead fisheries technician for the Yurok Tribe, right, and Gilbert Myers count dead chinook salmon pulled from a trap in the lower Klamath River on June 8, 2021, in Weitchpec, Calif. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. Several tribes in the region, including the Yurok, have been fighting for years to see the dams come down to aid the recovery of struggling salmon populations. (AP Photo/Nathan Howard, File)
            
              FILE - The Klamath River winds runs along Highway 96 on June 7, 2021, near Happy Camp, Calif. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. The vote by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on the lower Klamath River dams is the last major regulatory hurdle and the biggest milestone facing a $500 million demolition proposal championed by Native American tribes and environmentalists for years. (AP Photo/Nathan Howard, File)
            
              FILE - The Iron Gate Dam, powerhouse and spillway is seen on the lower Klamath River near Hornbrook, Calif, on March 3, 2020. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus, File)
            
              In this photo provided by Frankie Myers, members of the Yurok, Karuk and Hoopa Valley tribes and their supporters gather on a sand bar in the Klamath River near Orleans, Calif., to watch the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission meeting by satellite uplink on the fate of four dams on the lower Klamath River, Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022. Federal regulators unanimously approved a plan to decommission and demolish the dams in the largest dam demolition project in U.S. history. (Frankie Myers/Yurok Tribe via AP)
            
              In this photo provided by Frankie Myers, members of the Yurok, Karuk and Hoopa Valley tribes and their supporters gather on a sand bar in the Klamath River near Orleans, Calif., to watch the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission meeting by satellite uplink on the fate of four dams on the lower Klamath River, Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022. Federal regulators unanimously approved a plan to decommission and demolish the dams in the largest dam demolition project in U.S. history. (Frankie Myers/Yurok Tribe via AP)
            
              FILE - Jamie Holt, lead fisheries technician for the Yurok Tribe, right, and Gilbert Myers count dead chinook salmon pulled from a trap in the lower Klamath River on June 8, 2021, in Weitchpec, Calif. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. Several tribes in the region, including the Yurok, have been fighting for years to see the dams come down to aid the recovery of struggling salmon populations. (AP Photo/Nathan Howard, File)
            
              FILE - The Klamath River winds runs along Highway 96 on June 7, 2021, near Happy Camp, Calif. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. The vote by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on the lower Klamath River dams is the last major regulatory hurdle and the biggest milestone facing a $500 million demolition proposal championed by Native American tribes and environmentalists for years. (AP Photo/Nathan Howard, File)
            
              FILE - The Iron Gate Dam, powerhouse and spillway is seen on the lower Klamath River near Hornbrook, Calif, on March 3, 2020. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus, File)
            
              In this photo provided by Frankie Myers, members of the Yurok, Karuk and Hoopa Valley tribes and their supporters gather on a sand bar in the Klamath River near Orleans, Calif., to watch the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission meeting by satellite uplink on the fate of four dams on the lower Klamath River, Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022. Federal regulators unanimously approved a plan to decommission and demolish the dams in the largest dam demolition project in U.S. history. (Frankie Myers/Yurok Tribe via AP)
            
              In this photo provided by Frankie Myers, members of the Yurok, Karuk and Hoopa Valley tribes and their supporters gather on a sand bar in the Klamath River near Orleans, Calif., to watch the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission meeting by satellite uplink on the fate of four dams on the lower Klamath River, Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022. Federal regulators unanimously approved a plan to decommission and demolish the dams in the largest dam demolition project in U.S. history. (Frankie Myers/Yurok Tribe via AP)
            
              FILE - Jamie Holt, lead fisheries technician for the Yurok Tribe, right, and Gilbert Myers count dead chinook salmon pulled from a trap in the lower Klamath River on June 8, 2021, in Weitchpec, Calif. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. Several tribes in the region, including the Yurok, have been fighting for years to see the dams come down to aid the recovery of struggling salmon populations. (AP Photo/Nathan Howard, File)
            
              FILE - The Klamath River winds runs along Highway 96 on June 7, 2021, near Happy Camp, Calif. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. The vote by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on the lower Klamath River dams is the last major regulatory hurdle and the biggest milestone facing a $500 million demolition proposal championed by Native American tribes and environmentalists for years. (AP Photo/Nathan Howard, File)
            
              FILE - The Iron Gate Dam, powerhouse and spillway is seen on the lower Klamath River near Hornbrook, Calif, on March 3, 2020. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus, File)
            
              In this photo provided by Frankie Myers, members of the Yurok, Karuk and Hoopa Valley tribes and their supporters gather on a sand bar in the Klamath River near Orleans, Calif., to watch the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission meeting by satellite uplink on the fate of four dams on the lower Klamath River, Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022. Federal regulators unanimously approved a plan to decommission and demolish the dams in the largest dam demolition project in U.S. history. (Frankie Myers/Yurok Tribe via AP)
            
              In this photo provided by Frankie Myers, members of the Yurok, Karuk and Hoopa Valley tribes and their supporters gather on a sand bar in the Klamath River near Orleans, Calif., to watch the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission meeting by satellite uplink on the fate of four dams on the lower Klamath River, Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022. Federal regulators unanimously approved a plan to decommission and demolish the dams in the largest dam demolition project in U.S. history. (Frankie Myers/Yurok Tribe via AP)
            
              FILE - Jamie Holt, lead fisheries technician for the Yurok Tribe, right, and Gilbert Myers count dead chinook salmon pulled from a trap in the lower Klamath River on June 8, 2021, in Weitchpec, Calif. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. Several tribes in the region, including the Yurok, have been fighting for years to see the dams come down to aid the recovery of struggling salmon populations. (AP Photo/Nathan Howard, File)
            
              FILE - The Klamath River winds runs along Highway 96 on June 7, 2021, near Happy Camp, Calif. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. The vote by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on the lower Klamath River dams is the last major regulatory hurdle and the biggest milestone facing a $500 million demolition proposal championed by Native American tribes and environmentalists for years. (AP Photo/Nathan Howard, File)
            
              FILE - The Iron Gate Dam, powerhouse and spillway is seen on the lower Klamath River near Hornbrook, Calif, on March 3, 2020. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus, File)
            
              In this photo provided by Frankie Myers, members of the Yurok, Karuk and Hoopa Valley tribes and their supporters gather on a sand bar in the Klamath River near Orleans, Calif., to watch the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission meeting by satellite uplink on the fate of four dams on the lower Klamath River, Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022. Federal regulators unanimously approved a plan to decommission and demolish the dams in the largest dam demolition project in U.S. history. (Frankie Myers/Yurok Tribe via AP)
            
              In this photo provided by Frankie Myers, members of the Yurok, Karuk and Hoopa Valley tribes and their supporters gather on a sand bar in the Klamath River near Orleans, Calif., to watch the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission meeting by satellite uplink on the fate of four dams on the lower Klamath River, Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022. Federal regulators unanimously approved a plan to decommission and demolish the dams in the largest dam demolition project in U.S. history. (Frankie Myers/Yurok Tribe via AP)
            
              FILE - Jamie Holt, lead fisheries technician for the Yurok Tribe, right, and Gilbert Myers count dead chinook salmon pulled from a trap in the lower Klamath River on June 8, 2021, in Weitchpec, Calif. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. Several tribes in the region, including the Yurok, have been fighting for years to see the dams come down to aid the recovery of struggling salmon populations. (AP Photo/Nathan Howard, File)
            
              FILE - The Klamath River winds runs along Highway 96 on June 7, 2021, near Happy Camp, Calif. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. The vote by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on the lower Klamath River dams is the last major regulatory hurdle and the biggest milestone facing a $500 million demolition proposal championed by Native American tribes and environmentalists for years. (AP Photo/Nathan Howard, File)
            
              FILE - The Iron Gate Dam, powerhouse and spillway is seen on the lower Klamath River near Hornbrook, Calif, on March 3, 2020. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus, File)
            
              In this photo provided by Frankie Myers, members of the Yurok, Karuk and Hoopa Valley tribes and their supporters gather on a sand bar in the Klamath River near Orleans, Calif., to watch the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission meeting by satellite uplink on the fate of four dams on the lower Klamath River, Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022. Federal regulators unanimously approved a plan to decommission and demolish the dams in the largest dam demolition project in U.S. history. (Frankie Myers/Yurok Tribe via AP)
            
              In this photo provided by Frankie Myers, members of the Yurok, Karuk and Hoopa Valley tribes and their supporters gather on a sand bar in the Klamath River near Orleans, Calif., to watch the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission meeting by satellite uplink on the fate of four dams on the lower Klamath River, Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022. Federal regulators unanimously approved a plan to decommission and demolish the dams in the largest dam demolition project in U.S. history. (Frankie Myers/Yurok Tribe via AP)
            
              FILE - Jamie Holt, lead fisheries technician for the Yurok Tribe, right, and Gilbert Myers count dead chinook salmon pulled from a trap in the lower Klamath River on June 8, 2021, in Weitchpec, Calif. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. Several tribes in the region, including the Yurok, have been fighting for years to see the dams come down to aid the recovery of struggling salmon populations. (AP Photo/Nathan Howard, File)
            
              FILE - The Klamath River winds runs along Highway 96 on June 7, 2021, near Happy Camp, Calif. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. The vote by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on the lower Klamath River dams is the last major regulatory hurdle and the biggest milestone facing a $500 million demolition proposal championed by Native American tribes and environmentalists for years. (AP Photo/Nathan Howard, File)
            
              FILE - The Iron Gate Dam, powerhouse and spillway is seen on the lower Klamath River near Hornbrook, Calif, on March 3, 2020. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus, File)
            
              In this photo provided by Frankie Myers, members of the Yurok, Karuk and Hoopa Valley tribes and their supporters gather on a sand bar in the Klamath River near Orleans, Calif., to watch the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission meeting by satellite uplink on the fate of four dams on the lower Klamath River, Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022. Federal regulators unanimously approved a plan to decommission and demolish the dams in the largest dam demolition project in U.S. history. (Frankie Myers/Yurok Tribe via AP)
            
              In this photo provided by Frankie Myers, members of the Yurok, Karuk and Hoopa Valley tribes and their supporters gather on a sand bar in the Klamath River near Orleans, Calif., to watch the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission meeting by satellite uplink on the fate of four dams on the lower Klamath River, Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022. Federal regulators unanimously approved a plan to decommission and demolish the dams in the largest dam demolition project in U.S. history. (Frankie Myers/Yurok Tribe via AP)
            
              FILE - Jamie Holt, lead fisheries technician for the Yurok Tribe, right, and Gilbert Myers count dead chinook salmon pulled from a trap in the lower Klamath River on June 8, 2021, in Weitchpec, Calif. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. Several tribes in the region, including the Yurok, have been fighting for years to see the dams come down to aid the recovery of struggling salmon populations. (AP Photo/Nathan Howard, File)
            
              FILE - The Klamath River winds runs along Highway 96 on June 7, 2021, near Happy Camp, Calif. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. The vote by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on the lower Klamath River dams is the last major regulatory hurdle and the biggest milestone facing a $500 million demolition proposal championed by Native American tribes and environmentalists for years. (AP Photo/Nathan Howard, File)
            
              FILE - The Iron Gate Dam, powerhouse and spillway is seen on the lower Klamath River near Hornbrook, Calif, on March 3, 2020. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus, File)
            
              In this photo provided by Frankie Myers, members of the Yurok, Karuk and Hoopa Valley tribes and their supporters gather on a sand bar in the Klamath River near Orleans, Calif., to watch the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission meeting by satellite uplink on the fate of four dams on the lower Klamath River, Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022. Federal regulators unanimously approved a plan to decommission and demolish the dams in the largest dam demolition project in U.S. history. (Frankie Myers/Yurok Tribe via AP)
            
              In this photo provided by Frankie Myers, members of the Yurok, Karuk and Hoopa Valley tribes and their supporters gather on a sand bar in the Klamath River near Orleans, Calif., to watch the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission meeting by satellite uplink on the fate of four dams on the lower Klamath River, Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022. Federal regulators unanimously approved a plan to decommission and demolish the dams in the largest dam demolition project in U.S. history. (Frankie Myers/Yurok Tribe via AP)
            
              In this photo provided by Frankie Myers, members of the Yurok, Karuk and Hoopa Valley tribes and their supporters gather on a sand bar in the Klamath River near Orleans, Calif., to watch the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission meeting by satellite uplink on the fate of four dams on the lower Klamath River, Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022. Federal regulators unanimously approved a plan to decommission and demolish the dams in the largest dam demolition project in U.S. history. (Frankie Myers/Yurok Tribe via AP)
            
              FILE - Jamie Holt, lead fisheries technician for the Yurok Tribe, right, and Gilbert Myers count dead chinook salmon pulled from a trap in the lower Klamath River on June 8, 2021, in Weitchpec, Calif. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. Several tribes in the region, including the Yurok, have been fighting for years to see the dams come down to aid the recovery of struggling salmon populations. (AP Photo/Nathan Howard, File)
            
              In this photo provided by Frankie Myers, members of the Yurok, Karuk and Hoopa Valley tribes and their supporters gather on a sand bar in the Klamath River near Orleans, Calif., to watch the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission meeting by satellite uplink on the fate of four dams on the lower Klamath River, Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022. Federal regulators unanimously approved a plan to decommission and demolish the dams in the largest dam demolition project in U.S. history. (Frankie Myers/Yurok Tribe via AP)
            
              FILE - The Klamath River winds runs along Highway 96 on June 7, 2021, near Happy Camp, Calif. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. The vote by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on the lower Klamath River dams is the last major regulatory hurdle and the biggest milestone facing a $500 million demolition proposal championed by Native American tribes and environmentalists for years. (AP Photo/Nathan Howard, File)
            
              FILE - Jamie Holt, lead fisheries technician for the Yurok Tribe, right, and Gilbert Myers count dead chinook salmon pulled from a trap in the lower Klamath River on June 8, 2021, in Weitchpec, Calif. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. Several tribes in the region, including the Yurok, have been fighting for years to see the dams come down to aid the recovery of struggling salmon populations. (AP Photo/Nathan Howard, File)
            
              FILE - The Iron Gate Dam, powerhouse and spillway is seen on the lower Klamath River near Hornbrook, Calif, on March 3, 2020. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus, File)
            
              FILE - The Klamath River winds runs along Highway 96 on June 7, 2021, near Happy Camp, Calif. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. The vote by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on the lower Klamath River dams is the last major regulatory hurdle and the biggest milestone facing a $500 million demolition proposal championed by Native American tribes and environmentalists for years. (AP Photo/Nathan Howard, File)
            
              FILE - The Iron Gate Dam, powerhouse and spillway is seen on the lower Klamath River near Hornbrook, Calif, on March 3, 2020. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus, File)
            
              In this photo provided by Frankie Myers, members of the Yurok, Karuk and Hoopa Valley tribes and their supporters gather on a sand bar in the Klamath River near Orleans, Calif., to watch the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission meeting by satellite uplink on the fate of four dams on the lower Klamath River, Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022. Federal regulators unanimously approved a plan to decommission and demolish the dams in the largest dam demolition project in U.S. history. (Frankie Myers/Yurok Tribe via AP)
            
              In this photo provided by Frankie Myers, members of the Yurok, Karuk and Hoopa Valley tribes and their supporters gather on a sand bar in the Klamath River near Orleans, Calif., to watch the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission meeting by satellite uplink on the fate of four dams on the lower Klamath River, Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022. Federal regulators unanimously approved a plan to decommission and demolish the dams in the largest dam demolition project in U.S. history. (Frankie Myers/Yurok Tribe via AP)
            
              FILE - Jamie Holt, lead fisheries technician for the Yurok Tribe, right, and Gilbert Myers count dead chinook salmon pulled from a trap in the lower Klamath River on June 8, 2021, in Weitchpec, Calif. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. Several tribes in the region, including the Yurok, have been fighting for years to see the dams come down to aid the recovery of struggling salmon populations. (AP Photo/Nathan Howard, File)
            
              FILE - The Klamath River winds runs along Highway 96 on June 7, 2021, near Happy Camp, Calif. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. The vote by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on the lower Klamath River dams is the last major regulatory hurdle and the biggest milestone facing a $500 million demolition proposal championed by Native American tribes and environmentalists for years. (AP Photo/Nathan Howard, File)
            
              FILE - The Iron Gate Dam, powerhouse and spillway is seen on the lower Klamath River near Hornbrook, Calif, on March 3, 2020. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus, File)
            
              In this photo provided by Frankie Myers, members of the Yurok, Karuk and Hoopa Valley tribes and their supporters gather on a sand bar in the Klamath River near Orleans, Calif., to watch the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission meeting by satellite uplink on the fate of four dams on the lower Klamath River, Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022. Federal regulators unanimously approved a plan to decommission and demolish the dams in the largest dam demolition project in U.S. history. (Frankie Myers/Yurok Tribe via AP)
            
              In this photo provided by Frankie Myers, members of the Yurok, Karuk and Hoopa Valley tribes and their supporters gather on a sand bar in the Klamath River near Orleans, Calif., to watch the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission meeting by satellite uplink on the fate of four dams on the lower Klamath River, Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022. Federal regulators unanimously approved a plan to decommission and demolish the dams in the largest dam demolition project in U.S. history. (Frankie Myers/Yurok Tribe via AP)
            
              FILE - Jamie Holt, lead fisheries technician for the Yurok Tribe, right, and Gilbert Myers count dead chinook salmon pulled from a trap in the lower Klamath River on June 8, 2021, in Weitchpec, Calif. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. Several tribes in the region, including the Yurok, have been fighting for years to see the dams come down to aid the recovery of struggling salmon populations. (AP Photo/Nathan Howard, File)
            
              FILE - The Klamath River winds runs along Highway 96 on June 7, 2021, near Happy Camp, Calif. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. The vote by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on the lower Klamath River dams is the last major regulatory hurdle and the biggest milestone facing a $500 million demolition proposal championed by Native American tribes and environmentalists for years. (AP Photo/Nathan Howard, File)
            
              FILE - The Iron Gate Dam, powerhouse and spillway is seen on the lower Klamath River near Hornbrook, Calif, on March 3, 2020. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus, File)
            
              In this photo provided by Frankie Myers, members of the Yurok, Karuk and Hoopa Valley tribes and their supporters gather on a sand bar in the Klamath River near Orleans, Calif., to watch the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission meeting by satellite uplink on the fate of four dams on the lower Klamath River, Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022. Federal regulators unanimously approved a plan to decommission and demolish the dams in the largest dam demolition project in U.S. history. (Frankie Myers/Yurok Tribe via AP)
            
              In this photo provided by Frankie Myers, members of the Yurok, Karuk and Hoopa Valley tribes and their supporters gather on a sand bar in the Klamath River near Orleans, Calif., to watch the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission meeting by satellite uplink on the fate of four dams on the lower Klamath River, Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022. Federal regulators unanimously approved a plan to decommission and demolish the dams in the largest dam demolition project in U.S. history. (Frankie Myers/Yurok Tribe via AP)
            
              FILE - Jamie Holt, lead fisheries technician for the Yurok Tribe, right, and Gilbert Myers count dead chinook salmon pulled from a trap in the lower Klamath River on June 8, 2021, in Weitchpec, Calif. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. Several tribes in the region, including the Yurok, have been fighting for years to see the dams come down to aid the recovery of struggling salmon populations. (AP Photo/Nathan Howard, File)
            
              FILE - The Klamath River winds runs along Highway 96 on June 7, 2021, near Happy Camp, Calif. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. The vote by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on the lower Klamath River dams is the last major regulatory hurdle and the biggest milestone facing a $500 million demolition proposal championed by Native American tribes and environmentalists for years. (AP Photo/Nathan Howard, File)
            
              FILE - The Iron Gate Dam, powerhouse and spillway is seen on the lower Klamath River near Hornbrook, Calif, on March 3, 2020. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus, File)
            
              In this photo provided by Frankie Myers, members of the Yurok, Karuk and Hoopa Valley tribes and their supporters gather on a sand bar in the Klamath River near Orleans, Calif., to watch the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission meeting by satellite uplink on the fate of four dams on the lower Klamath River, Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022. Federal regulators unanimously approved a plan to decommission and demolish the dams in the largest dam demolition project in U.S. history. (Frankie Myers/Yurok Tribe via AP)
            
              In this photo provided by Frankie Myers, members of the Yurok, Karuk and Hoopa Valley tribes and their supporters gather on a sand bar in the Klamath River near Orleans, Calif., to watch the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission meeting by satellite uplink on the fate of four dams on the lower Klamath River, Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022. Federal regulators unanimously approved a plan to decommission and demolish the dams in the largest dam demolition project in U.S. history. (Frankie Myers/Yurok Tribe via AP)
            
              FILE - Jamie Holt, lead fisheries technician for the Yurok Tribe, right, and Gilbert Myers count dead chinook salmon pulled from a trap in the lower Klamath River on June 8, 2021, in Weitchpec, Calif. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. Several tribes in the region, including the Yurok, have been fighting for years to see the dams come down to aid the recovery of struggling salmon populations. (AP Photo/Nathan Howard, File)
            
              FILE - The Klamath River winds runs along Highway 96 on June 7, 2021, near Happy Camp, Calif. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. The vote by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on the lower Klamath River dams is the last major regulatory hurdle and the biggest milestone facing a $500 million demolition proposal championed by Native American tribes and environmentalists for years. (AP Photo/Nathan Howard, File)
            
              FILE - The Iron Gate Dam, powerhouse and spillway is seen on the lower Klamath River near Hornbrook, Calif, on March 3, 2020. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus, File)
            
              FILE - Jamie Holt, lead fisheries technician for the Yurok Tribe, right, and Gilbert Myers count dead chinook salmon pulled from a trap in the lower Klamath River on June 8, 2021, in Weitchpec, Calif. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. Several tribes in the region, including the Yurok, have been fighting for years to see the dams come down to aid the recovery of struggling salmon populations. (AP Photo/Nathan Howard, File)
            
              FILE - The Klamath River winds runs along Highway 96 on June 7, 2021, near Happy Camp, Calif. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. The vote by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on the lower Klamath River dams is the last major regulatory hurdle and the biggest milestone facing a $500 million demolition proposal championed by Native American tribes and environmentalists for years. (AP Photo/Nathan Howard, File)
            
              FILE - The Iron Gate Dam, powerhouse and spillway is seen on the lower Klamath River near Hornbrook, Calif, on March 3, 2020. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus, File)
            
              FILE - Jamie Holt, lead fisheries technician for the Yurok Tribe, right, and Gilbert Myers count dead chinook salmon pulled from a trap in the lower Klamath River on June 8, 2021, in Weitchpec, Calif. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. Several tribes in the region, including the Yurok, have been fighting for years to see the dams come down to aid the recovery of struggling salmon populations. (AP Photo/Nathan Howard, File)
            
              FILE - The Klamath River winds runs along Highway 96 on June 7, 2021, near Happy Camp, Calif. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. The vote by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on the lower Klamath River dams is the last major regulatory hurdle and the biggest milestone facing a $500 million demolition proposal championed by Native American tribes and environmentalists for years. (AP Photo/Nathan Howard, File)
            
              FILE - The Iron Gate Dam, powerhouse and spillway is seen on the lower Klamath River near Hornbrook, Calif, on March 3, 2020. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus, File)
            
              FILE - Jamie Holt, lead fisheries technician for the Yurok Tribe, right, and Gilbert Myers count dead chinook salmon pulled from a trap in the lower Klamath River on June 8, 2021, in Weitchpec, Calif. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. Several tribes in the region, including the Yurok, have been fighting for years to see the dams come down to aid the recovery of struggling salmon populations. (AP Photo/Nathan Howard, File)
            
              FILE - The Klamath River winds runs along Highway 96 on June 7, 2021, near Happy Camp, Calif. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. The vote by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on the lower Klamath River dams is the last major regulatory hurdle and the biggest milestone facing a $500 million demolition proposal championed by Native American tribes and environmentalists for years. (AP Photo/Nathan Howard, File)
            
              FILE - The Iron Gate Dam, powerhouse and spillway is seen on the lower Klamath River near Hornbrook, Calif, on March 3, 2020. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus, File)
            
              FILE - Jamie Holt, lead fisheries technician for the Yurok Tribe, right, and Gilbert Myers count dead chinook salmon pulled from a trap in the lower Klamath River on June 8, 2021, in Weitchpec, Calif. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. Several tribes in the region, including the Yurok, have been fighting for years to see the dams come down to aid the recovery of struggling salmon populations. (AP Photo/Nathan Howard, File)
            
              FILE - The Klamath River winds runs along Highway 96 on June 7, 2021, near Happy Camp, Calif. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. The vote by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on the lower Klamath River dams is the last major regulatory hurdle and the biggest milestone facing a $500 million demolition proposal championed by Native American tribes and environmentalists for years. (AP Photo/Nathan Howard, File)
            
              FILE - The Iron Gate Dam, powerhouse and spillway is seen on the lower Klamath River near Hornbrook, Calif, on March 3, 2020. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus, File)
            
              FILE - Jamie Holt, lead fisheries technician for the Yurok Tribe, right, and Gilbert Myers count dead chinook salmon pulled from a trap in the lower Klamath River on June 8, 2021, in Weitchpec, Calif. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. Several tribes in the region, including the Yurok, have been fighting for years to see the dams come down to aid the recovery of struggling salmon populations. (AP Photo/Nathan Howard, File)
            
              FILE - The Klamath River winds runs along Highway 96 on June 7, 2021, near Happy Camp, Calif. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. The vote by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on the lower Klamath River dams is the last major regulatory hurdle and the biggest milestone facing a $500 million demolition proposal championed by Native American tribes and environmentalists for years. (AP Photo/Nathan Howard, File)
            
              FILE - The Iron Gate Dam, powerhouse and spillway is seen on the lower Klamath River near Hornbrook, Calif, on March 3, 2020. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus, File)
            
              FILE - Jamie Holt, lead fisheries technician for the Yurok Tribe, right, and Gilbert Myers count dead chinook salmon pulled from a trap in the lower Klamath River on June 8, 2021, in Weitchpec, Calif. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. Several tribes in the region, including the Yurok, have been fighting for years to see the dams come down to aid the recovery of struggling salmon populations. (AP Photo/Nathan Howard, File)
            
              FILE - The Klamath River winds runs along Highway 96 on June 7, 2021, near Happy Camp, Calif. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. The vote by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on the lower Klamath River dams is the last major regulatory hurdle and the biggest milestone facing a $500 million demolition proposal championed by Native American tribes and environmentalists for years. (AP Photo/Nathan Howard, File)
            
              FILE - The Iron Gate Dam, powerhouse and spillway is seen on the lower Klamath River near Hornbrook, Calif, on March 3, 2020. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus, File)
            
              FILE - Jamie Holt, lead fisheries technician for the Yurok Tribe, right, and Gilbert Myers count dead chinook salmon pulled from a trap in the lower Klamath River on June 8, 2021, in Weitchpec, Calif. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. Several tribes in the region, including the Yurok, have been fighting for years to see the dams come down to aid the recovery of struggling salmon populations. (AP Photo/Nathan Howard, File)
            
              FILE - The Klamath River winds runs along Highway 96 on June 7, 2021, near Happy Camp, Calif. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. The vote by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on the lower Klamath River dams is the last major regulatory hurdle and the biggest milestone facing a $500 million demolition proposal championed by Native American tribes and environmentalists for years. (AP Photo/Nathan Howard, File)
            
              FILE - The Iron Gate Dam, powerhouse and spillway is seen on the lower Klamath River near Hornbrook, Calif, on March 3, 2020. The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus, File)
            
              FILE - A dam on the lower Klamath River known as Copco 2 is seen near Hornbrook, Calif., on March 3, 2020. Plans for the largest dam demolition project in U.S. history to save imperiled salmon could soon become reality, with the first stages of construction starting in California as early as this summer. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission meets Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, and is expected to vote on whether to approve the surrender of PacificCorp's hydroelectric license for four dams on the lower Klamath River in remote northern California. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus, File)
            
              FILE - Excess water spills over the top of a dam on the Lower Klamath River known as Copco 1 near Hornbrook, Calif., on March 3, 2020. Plans for the largest dam demolition project in U.S. history to save imperiled salmon could soon become reality, with the first stages of construction starting in California as early as this summer. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission meets Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, and is expected to vote on whether to approve the surrender of PacificCorp's hydroelectric license for four dams on the lower Klamath River in remote northern California. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus, File)
            
              FILE - The J.C. Boyle Dam diverts water from the Klamath River to a powerhouse downstream on Aug. 21, 2009, in Keno, Ore. Plans for the largest dam demolition project in U.S. history to save imperiled salmon could soon become reality, with the first stages of construction starting in California as early as this summer. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission meets Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022, and is expected to vote on whether to approve the surrender of PacificCorp's hydroelectric license for four dams on the lower Klamath River in remote northern California. (AP Photo/Jeff Barnard, File)