Ukraine war: boost or setback for climate efforts?


              Steam rises from the coal-fired power plant Niederaussem, Germany, Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2022. Analysts say the war has accelerated the path toward clean energy in Europe as the continent works to wean itself off Russian supplies, although there are concerns from climate hawks this isn't happening fast enough. (AP Photo/Michael Probst)
            
              FILE - A woman works at a coal depot in Ahmedabad, India, May 2, 2022. The question of whether the conflict in Ukraine will hasten or hinder the shift from fossil fuels to clean energy needed to keep global temperatures from reaching dangerous heights looms large ahead of next week's U.N. climate conference. (AP Photo/Ajit Solanki, File)
            
              FILE - A gas pipeline stands over the road leading to a destroyed coal mine in the middle of a minefield at the frontline near Mar'inka, eastern Ukraine, Tuesday, Feb. 22, 2022. Analysts say the war has accelerated the path toward clean energy in Europe as the continent works to wean itself off Russian supplies, although there are concerns from climate hawks this isn't happening fast enough. (AP Photo/Mstyslav Chernov, File)
            
              A bucket wheel excavator is mining coal at the Garzweiler open-cast coal mine with wind mills in the background in Luetzerath, Germany, Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2022. In background the coal-fired power plant Niederaussem. (AP Photo/Michael Probst)
            
              Steam rises from the coal-fired power plant Niederaussem, Germany, Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2022. Analysts say the war has accelerated the path toward clean energy in Europe as the continent works to wean itself off Russian supplies, although there are concerns from climate hawks this isn't happening fast enough. (AP Photo/Michael Probst)
            
              FILE - A woman works at a coal depot in Ahmedabad, India, May 2, 2022. The question of whether the conflict in Ukraine will hasten or hinder the shift from fossil fuels to clean energy needed to keep global temperatures from reaching dangerous heights looms large ahead of next week's U.N. climate conference. (AP Photo/Ajit Solanki, File)
            
              FILE - A gas pipeline stands over the road leading to a destroyed coal mine in the middle of a minefield at the frontline near Mar'inka, eastern Ukraine, Tuesday, Feb. 22, 2022. Analysts say the war has accelerated the path toward clean energy in Europe as the continent works to wean itself off Russian supplies, although there are concerns from climate hawks this isn't happening fast enough. (AP Photo/Mstyslav Chernov, File)
            
              A bucket wheel excavator is mining coal at the Garzweiler open-cast coal mine with wind mills in the background in Luetzerath, Germany, Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2022. In background the coal-fired power plant Niederaussem. (AP Photo/Michael Probst)
            
              FILE - Activists Luisa Neubauer, from Germany, right, and Elizabeth Wathuti, from Kenya, talk to the media at a news conference at the Garzweiler open-cast coal mine near Luetzerath, western Germany, Sunday Oct. 16, 2022. About 1,000 miles away from Ukraine, Luetzerath is an indirect victim of the war as the town will soon make way for the expansion of a nearby coal mine. Wathuti said she couldn’t understand how Germany could justify burning more coal when the impacts of climate change are already becoming apparent. (AP Photo/Martin Meissner, File)
            
              FILE - A flock of sheep graze in front of a coal-fired power plant at the Garzweiler open-cast coal mine near Luetzerath, western Germany, Sunday Oct. 16, 2022. About 1,000 miles away from Ukraine, Luetzerath is an indirect victim of the war as the town will soon make way for the expansion of a nearby coal mine. Environmentalists have been up in arms about the decision which would pump millions more tons of planet-warming carbon dioxide into the air. (AP Photo/Martin Meissner, File)