ShotSpotter document reveals key human role in gunshot tech


              FILE - A ShotSpotter Dispatch program is in operation within the Fusion Watch department at the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police headquarters in Las Vegas on Wednesday, Jan. 13, 2021. In more than 140 cities across the United States in 2023, ShotSpotter’s artificial intelligence algorithm and its intricate network of microphones evaluate hundreds of thousands of sounds a year to determine if they are gunfire, generating data now being used in criminal cases nationwide. (L.E. Baskow/Las Vegas Review-Journal via AP, File)
            
              FILE - ShotSpotter CEO Ralph Clark stands for a portrait at one of the company's facilities in Newark, Calif., on Tuesday, Aug, 10, 2021. Clark has said that the system’s machine classifications are improved by its “real-world feedback loops from humans.” However, a 2022 study found humans tend to overestimate their abilities to identify sounds. (AP Photo/Josh Edelson, File)
            
              FILE - Michael Williams sits for an interview in his South Side Chicago home Tuesday, July 27, 2021. A ShotSpotter operations document, which the company had argued in court for more than a year was a trade secret, was released in late 2022 in a Chicago court case, in which police and prosecutors used ShotSpotter data as evidence in charging Williams, a Chicago grandfather with murder in 2020 for allegedly shooting a man inside his car. He spent nearly a year in jail before a judge dismissed the case on grounds of insufficient evidence. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast, File)
            
              FILE - ShotSpotter equipment overlooks the intersection of South Stony Island Avenue and East 63rd Street in Chicago on Tuesday, Aug. 10, 2021. In more than 140 cities across the United States in 2023, ShotSpotter’s artificial intelligence algorithm and its intricate network of microphones evaluate hundreds of thousands of sounds a year to determine if they are gunfire, generating data now being used in criminal cases nationwide. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast, File)
            
              FILE - Law enforcement personnel use an interactive electronic map for the ShotSpotter Dispatch program running within the Fusion Watch department at the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Headquarters Wednesday, Jan. 13, 2021, in Las Vegas. In more than 140 cities across the United States in 2023, ShotSpotter’s artificial intelligence algorithm and its intricate network of microphones evaluate hundreds of thousands of sounds a year to determine if they are gunfire, generating data now being used in criminal cases nationwide. (L.E. Baskow/Las Vegas Review-Journal via AP, File)