Opioid-ravaged West Virginia looks to $26B deal for help


              A crumbling parking lot at the Prestera Center headquarters is shown Wednesday, July 21, 2021 in Huntington, W. Va. In one of the epicenters of the U.S. opioid explosion, the nonprofit mental health and addiction treatment provider really could use some money. Whether from a potential national settlement deal with big U.S. drug distribution companies or from some other source, an infusion of cash would help stem the tide of losses in staffing and other areas in recent years, along with the strain caused by the coronavirus pandemic. (AP Photo/John Raby)
            
              A crumbling parking lot at the Prestera Center headquarters is shown Wednesday, July 21, 2021 in Huntington, W. Va. In one of the epicenters of the U.S. opioid explosion, the nonprofit mental health and addiction treatment provider really could use some money. Whether from a potential national settlement deal with big U.S. drug distribution companies or from some other source, an infusion of cash would help stem the tide of losses in staffing and other areas in recent years, along with the strain caused by the coronavirus pandemic. (AP Photo/John Raby)
            
              Lisa Zappia, chief executive officer of mental health and addiction treatment services provider Prestera Center, speaks during an interview Wednesday, July 21, 2021, at her office in Huntington, W.Va. In one of the epicenters of the U.S. opioid explosion, the nonprofit group really could use some money. Whether from a potential national settlement deal with big U.S. drug distribution companies or from some other source, an infusion of cash would help stem the tide of losses in staffing and other areas in recent years, along with the strain caused by the coronavirus pandemic. (AP Photo/John Raby)