New Mexico seeks tougher provisions for US nuclear dump


              FILE - In this April 9, 2019, file photo, provided by Los Alamos National Laboratory, barrels of radioactive waste are loaded for transport to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, marking the first transuranic waste loading operations in five years at the Radioactive Assay Nondestructive Testing (RANT) facility in Los Alamos, N.M. On Thursday, Dec. 8, 2022, New Mexico officials outlined new conditions for a proposed permit for the U.S. government to continue disposing of nuclear waste in the southeast corner of the state as part of a multibillion-dollar federal cleanup program. (Nestor Trujillo/Los Alamos National Laboratory via AP, File)
            
              FILE - A worker drives a cart through a tunnel inside the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant No. 2, 150-feet below the surface near Carlsbad, N.M., on April 8, 1998. On Thursday, Dec. 8, 2022, New Mexico officials outlined new conditions for a proposed permit for the U.S. government to continue disposing of nuclear waste in the southeast corner of the state as part of a multibillion-dollar federal cleanup program. (AP Photo/Eric Draper, File)
            
              FILE - This undated file image provided by the U.S. Department of Energy shows an electric continuous miner machine run by Randy Wilson, left, and Blas Castaneda, chewing through a wall of salt during the excavation of Panel 8 at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant near Carlsbad, N.M. On Thursday, Dec. 8, 2022, New Mexico officials  outlined new conditions for a proposed permit for the U.S. government to continue disposing of nuclear waste in the southeast corner of the state as part of a multibillion-dollar federal cleanup program. (Samuel Moon Christensen/U.S. Department of Energy via AP, File)