Howard Schultz


              Howard Schultz, left, chairman and CEO of Starbucks Coffee Company, sits and drinks tea with Oprah Winfrey, right, to announce their partnership to offer Teavana Oprah Chai tea, Wednesday, March 19, 2014, at Starbucks' annual shareholders meeting in Seattle. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
                          Howard Schultz, chairman and CEO of Starbucks Coffee Company, speaks Wednesday, March 19, 2014, at the company's annual shareholders meeting in Seattle. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
                          Howard Schultz, chairman and CEO of Starbucks Coffee Company, talks about Starbucks' Teavana tea products, Wednesday, March 19, 2014, at the company's annual shareholders meeting in Seattle. Schultz says growth in the tea market is a key part of Starbucks' strategy for the years ahead. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
            Howard Schultz, CEO of Starbucks Coffee Company, discusses Starbucks Via instant coffee, Tuesday, Sept. 29, 2009 in New York. Starbucks Corp. began handing out tens of thousands of free samples of its latest product Tuesday, hoping to persuade consumers to try what many see as a down-market drink. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan) FILE - In this March 18, 2015 file photo, Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz speaks at the coffee company's annual shareholders meeting in Seattle. Starbucks will report earnings Thursday April 23, 2015.  (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, File) FILE - In this March 22, 2017, file photo, Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz speaks at the Starbucks annual shareholders meeting in Seattle. For someone who has given about $150,000 to Democratic campaigns over the years, Schultz is generating tepid, or even hostile, responses within the party as he weighs a presidential bid in 2020. That's because reports have suggested he's considering running as an independent, a prospect that could draw support away from the eventual Democratic nominee and hand President Donald Trump another four years in office, many fret. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File) FILE - In this March 22, 2017, file photo, Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz wipes at his eyes after listening to an employee speak of her experience of going to Charleston, S.C., in the aftermath of a mass shooting at a church there in 2015, during a forum at Starbucks annual shareholders meeting in Seattle. For someone who has given about $150,000 to Democratic campaigns over the years, Schultz is generating tepid, or even hostile, responses within the party as he weighs a presidential bid in 2020. That's because reports have suggested he's considering running as an independent, a prospect that could draw support away from the eventual Democratic nominee and hand President Donald Trump another four years in office, many fret.(AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File) FILE - In this May 19, 2017, file photo, Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz, right, shakes hands with a job seeker during the Opportunity Fair and Forum employment event in Dallas. For someone who has given about $150,000 to Democratic campaigns over the years, Schultz is generating tepid, or even hostile, responses within the party as he weighs a presidential bid in 2020. That's because reports have suggested he's considering running as an independent, a prospect that could draw support away from the eventual Democratic nominee and hand President Donald Trump another four years in office, many fret. (AP Photo/LM Otero, File) FILE - In this March 22, 2017 file photo, Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz speaks at the Starbucks annual shareholders meeting in Seattle. For someone who has given about $150,000 to Democratic campaigns over the years, Schultz is generating tepid, or even hostile, responses within the party as he weighs a presidential bid in 2020. That's because reports have suggested he's considering running as an independent, a prospect that could draw support away from the eventual Democratic nominee and hand President Donald Trump another four years in office, many fret. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)