Grab him up, take him to the river: Inside a KKK murder plot


              A customer walks through the parking lot of a Starbucks coffee shop in Lake City, Fla., Friday, April 16, 2021. In 2015, a klansman working as an informant for the FBI met with fellow klansmen outside the coffee shop about murdering a Black former inmate from the prison where some of them worked as prison guards. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
            
              A mural titled "Bygone Days" decorates a downtown building as a child rushes to cross a street in Palatka, Fla., Tuesday, April 13, 2021. Jim Crow Florida was one of the most dangerous places in the South to be Black. In that era, a Black man in Florida was more at risk of being lynched - an execution without trial, often by gun or hanging - than in any other state, according to a University of Georgia study of lynching records. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
            
              A sign stands in a vacant storefront window in Palatka, Fla., Tuesday, April 13, 2021. The town, with a population split almost equally between Black and white, had been devastated by the 2008 Great Recession. Many of its prized murals were fading, and there were more shuttered shops in the old downtown than open. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
            
              Lights from street signs and traveling cars drift out of focus in Paltaka, Fla., Thursday, April 15, 2021, along a road that runs from the former home of Charles Newcomb, the local KKK Exalted Cyclops, to where he and accomplices traveled to scope out the home of Warren Williams, a Black man whom they were planning on kidnapping and murdering. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
            
              Customers wait in line at a Dairy Queen on a warm evening in Palatka, Fla., Wednesday, April 14, 2021. The town has a population split almost equally between Black and white. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
            
              Railroad tracks meet a dead end street in Palatka, Fla., on Thursday, April 15, 2021, where Warren Williams lived at the time an FBI probe revealed a 2015 murder plot against him by klansmen working as prison guards. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
            
              A sign featuring a pistol barrel pointed at would-be trespassers warns, "There is Nothing Here Worth Dying For" at the former home of Charles Newcomb, in Hawthorne, Fla., Thursday, April 15, 2021. Newcomb, the local KKK chapter's leader, known as the Exalted Cyclops, was involved in a 2015 murder plot against a former inmate at a prison where Newcomb once worked as a guard. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
            
              The sun sets between the trees in Hawthorne, Fla., Thursday, April 15, 2021, along a road that runs from the former home of Charles Newcomb, the local KKK Exalted Cyclops, to where he and accomplices traveled to scope out the home of Warren Williams, whom they were planning on kidnapping and murdering in 2015. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
            
              A KKK "blood oath" signed by Joseph Moore is photographed at the Columbia County Courthouse in Lake City, Fla., Friday, April 16, 2021. On Jan. 30, 2015, less than two years after Moore had signed it, a murder plot with other klansmen was in motion, and he was involved. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
            
              A pickup truck with a Confederate flag-themed decal is parked outside the Reception and Medical Center, the state's prison hospital where new inmates are processed, in Lake Butler, Fla., Friday, April 16, 2021. In 2013, at a prison dorm room in the facility, Warren Williams, a Black inmate who suffered from severe anxiety and depression, found himself in front of Thomas Driver, a white prison guard, after he lost his identification badge, a prison infraction. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
            
              A guard tower stands behind the entrance to the Reception and Medical Center, the state's prison hospital where new inmates are processed, in Lake Butler, Fla., Friday, April 16, 2021. In 2013, at a prison dorm room in the facility, Warren Williams, a Black inmate who suffered from severe anxiety and depression, found himself in front of Thomas Driver, a white prison guard, after he lost his identification badge, a prison infraction. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
            
              Mannequins stand in a window paying tribute to military and public service members along a downtown street in Palatka, Fla., Tuesday, April 13, 2021. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
            
              Worshippers leave a church service in Palatka, Fla., Wednesday, April 14, 2021. Palatka, with a population split almost equally between Black and white, had been devastated by the 2008 Great Recession. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
            
              Pastor Karl Flagg, a former mayor, stands for a portrait at the funeral home he runs in Palatka, Fla., Wednesday, April 14, 2021. In the 1920s, Jim Crow Florida was one of the most dangerous places in the South to be Black. In that era, a Black man in Florida was more at risk of being lynched - an execution without trial, often by gun or hanging - than in any other state, according to a University of Georgia study of lynching records. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
            
              Spanish moss hangs from a tree along the St. Johns River in Palatka, Fla., Thursday, April 15, 2021. After months in a prison cell, Warren Williams longed to fish the St. Johns again. He looked forward to spending days outdoors in his landscaping job, and to writing poems and music in his free time. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
            
              An evening gown is displayed in a store window next to a mural titled "Harlem Nights in Palatka," featuring musicians from the town that formed a 1920s jazz band, as a pedestrian walks by in downtown Palatka, Fla., on Tuesday, April 13, 2021. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
            
              A Confederate monument stands outside the Putnam County Courthouse in Palatka, Fla., Thursday, April 15, 2021. Each time he reported to his probation officer, Warren Williams would pass the statue. It, along with the gangly live oak trees in the court square, are mesmerizing to some observers, but to others they're a painful reminder of past lynchings. In the 1920s, Jim Crow Florida was one of the most dangerous places in the South to be Black. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
            
              A Confederate statue stands outside the Putnam County Courthouse in Palatka, Fla., Tuesday, April 13, 2021. In the 1920s, Jim Crow Florida was one of the most dangerous places in the South to be Black. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
            
              Latonya Crowley, mother of Warren Williams, stands for a portrait in Palatka, Fla., Thursday, April 22, 2021. An FBI probe revealed a murder plot against her son by klansmen working as prison guards where Williams was once an inmate. "In the state of mind that he's in today. I don't see him getting better," Crowley says, as she and her son live today with uncertainty and paranoia. One of the guards' imminent release and the specter of other klansmen have made it impossible for Williams to move on. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
            
              A fisherman walks along a dock on the St. Johns River as a coal-fired power plant stands in the background, in Palatka, Fla., Wednesday, April 14, 2021. After months in a prison cell, Warren Williams longed to fish the St. Johns again. He looked forward to spending days outdoors in his landscaping job, and to writing poems and music in his free time. (AP Photo/David Goldman)