Feral hog control: 8 years, some progress, $2.5B damage/year


              FILE - Trapper John Schmidt, a wildlife trapper, walks past damage from feral hogs that happened overnight while foraging near one of his traps in New Orleans, June 17, 2014. Eight years into a U.S. program to control damage from feral pigs, the invasive animals are still a multibillion-dollar plague on farmers, wildlife and the environment. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert, File)
            
              A hog wanders in Lithonia, Ga., in 2013. Eight years into a U.S. program to control damage from feral pigs, the invasive animals are still a multibillion-dollar plague on farmers, wildlife and the environment. (John Spink/Atlanta Journal-Constitution via AP)
            
              In this image provided by McLendon Acres Inc., hog damage is visible within a corn field on June 28, 2022, Leesburg, Ga. Eight years into a U.S. program to control damage from feral pigs, the invasive animals are still a multibillion-dollar plague on farmers, wildlife and the environment. (Kelsea Hancock/McLendon Acres Inc. via AP)
            
              Northwest Exterminating's Wes Curtis prepares a trap with foliage and feed Thursday, Sept. 26, 2013, in Lithonia, Ga. Eight years into a U.S. program to control damage from feral pigs, the invasive animals are still a multibillion-dollar plague on farmers, wildlife and the environment. (John Spink/Atlanta Journal-Constitution via AP)
            
              FILE - Two feral hogs are caught in a trap on a farm in rural Washington County, Mo., Jan. 27, 2019. Eight years into a U.S. program to control damage from feral pigs, the invasive animals are still a multibillion-dollar plague on farmers, wildlife and the environment. (David Carson/St. Louis Post-Dispatch via AP)