EXPLAINER: What Russia’s suspension of grain deal could mean


              Martin Griffiths, Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator, speaks about the situation of grain shipments from Ukraine following a Security Council meeting at United Nations headquarters, Monday, Oct. 31, 2022. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)
            
              FILE - The Panama-flagged cargo ship Lady Zehma anchors in the Marmara Sea in Istanbul, Turkey, on Sept. 2, 2022. Russia has suspended its part of the deal allowing Ukraine to ship grain from its Black Sea ports safely amid a months long war, and it appears that the remaining partners are now left to take their chances. (AP Photo/Khalil Hamra, File)
            
              Russian Ambassador to the United Nations Vasily Nebenzya, seated, speaks with Dmitry Polyanskiy, First Deputy Permanent Representative of the Russian Federation, just before Nebenzya addressed the Security Council during a session to discuss the situation with grain shipments from Ukraine at United Nations headquarters, Monday, Oct. 31, 2022. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)
            
              FILE - Crew members of the cargo ship Med Island, which came from Ukraine loaded with grain, prepare the ship for inspection by U.N. officials, while it is anchored in the Marmara Sea in Istanbul, Turkey, on Oct. 1, 2022. Russia has suspended its part of the deal allowing Ukraine to ship grain from its Black Sea ports safely amid a months long war, and it appears that the remaining partners are now left to take their chances. (AP Photo/Khalil Hamra, File)
            FILE - The ship Navi-Star sits full of grain since Russia's invasion of Ukraine began five months ago as it waits to sail from the Odesa Sea Port, in Odesa, Ukraine, July 29, 2022. U.S. President Joe Biden has warned that global hunger could increase because of Russia's suspension of a U.N.-brokered deal to allow safe passage for ships carrying Ukrainian grain. (AP Photo/David Goldman, File)