Experts see Canada’s euthanasia laws as threat to disabled


              This photo provided by Gary Nichols shows him, right, with his brother, Alan, on the eve of his euthanization in Chilliwack, British Columbia, Canada, in July 2019. Alan submitted a request to be euthanized and he was killed, despite concerns raised by his family and a nurse practitioner. Nichols’ family reported the case to police and health authorities, arguing that he lacked the capacity to understand the process and was not suffering unbearably — among the requirements for euthanasia. “Alan was basically put to death,” his brother, Gary, says. (Courtesy Gary Nichols via AP)
            
              This image shows part of a medical request form for euthanasia filled out by Alan Nichols of Chilliwack, British Columbia, Canada. His application listed only one health condition as the reason for his request to die: hearing loss. The current law allows people with serious disabilities to choose to be killed in the absence of any other medical issue. (Courtesy Gary Nichols via AP)
            
              This photo provided by Gary Nichols shows him, right, with his brother, Alan, on the eve of his euthanization in Chilliwack, British Columbia, Canada, in July 2019. Alan submitted a request to be euthanized and he was killed, despite concerns raised by his family and a nurse practitioner. Nichols’ family reported the case to police and health authorities, arguing that he lacked the capacity to understand the process and was not suffering unbearably — among the requirements for euthanasia. “Alan was basically put to death,” his brother, Gary, says. (Courtesy Gary Nichols via AP)