Diana’s death stunned the world — and changed the royals


              FILE - Britain's Prince William, left and Prince Harry unveil a statue they commissioned of their mother Princess Diana, on what woud have been her 60th birthday, in the Sunken Garden at Kensington Palace, London, Thursday July 1, 2021. (Dominic Lipinski /Pool Photo via AP, File)
            
              FILE - In this Tuesday, July 10, 2018 file photo Britain's Queen Elizabeth II, Meghan the Duchess of Sussex and Prince Harry stand on a balcony to watch a flypast of Royal Air Force aircraft pass over Buckingham Palace in London. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham, File)
            
              FILE - Spectators weep in the crowd along London's Whitehall Saturday Sept. 6, 1997, during funeral ceremonies for Diana, Princess of Wales. Above all, there was shock. That’s the word people use over and over again when they remember Princess Diana’s death in a Paris car crash 25 years ago this week. The woman the world watched grow from a shy teenage nursery school teacher into a glamorous celebrity who comforted AIDS patients and campaigned for landmine removal couldn’t be dead at the age of 36, could she? (AP Photo/Jerome Delay/Pool, File)
            
              FILE - Britain's Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip view the floral tributes to Diana, Princess of Wales, at London's Buckingham Palace, Friday, Sept. 5, 1997.  Above all, there was shock. That’s the word people use over and over again when they remember Princess Diana’s death in a Paris car crash 25 years ago this week. The woman the world watched grow from a shy teenage nursery school teacher into a glamorous celebrity who comforted AIDS patients and campaigned for landmine removal couldn’t be dead at the age of 36, could she? (Pool Photo via AP, File)
            
              FILE - This is an aerial view showing the large pile of flowers at the gates of Kensington Palace in London, as the crowds continue to arrive to pay their respects to the late Princess Diana, in this Thursday, Sept. 4, 1997. (AP Photo/Adrian Dennis, File)
            
              FILE- In this early Sunday, Aug. 31, 1997 file photo, police services prepare to take away the car in which Britain's Diana, Princess of Wales, died in Paris, in a car crash that also killed her companion Dodi Fayed, and chauffeur. It has been nearly 25 years since Princess Diana died in a high-speed car crash in Paris. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay, File)
            
              FILE - Diana, Princess of Wales, right, and her companion Dodi Fayed, walk on a pontoon in the French Riviera resort of St. Tropez in this Friday, Aug. 22, 1997. (AP Photo/Patrick Bar-Nice Matin, File)
            
              FILE - Diana, the Princess of Wales during her visit to Leicester, England on May 27, 1997 to formally open The Richard Attenborough Centre for Disability and Arts. Above all, there was shock. That’s the word people use over and over again when they remember Princess Diana’s death in a Paris car crash 25 years ago this week. The woman the world watched grow from a shy teenage nursery school teacher into a glamorous celebrity who comforted AIDS patients and campaigned for landmine removal couldn’t be dead at the age of 36, could she? (AP Photo/John Stillwell, Pool File)
            
              FILE - Diana, Princess of Wales, left, and Britain's Queen Elizabeth II smile to well-wishers outside Clarence House in London on Aug. 4, 1987. (AP Photo/Martin Cleaver, File)
            
              FILE - Britain's Princess Diana of Wales smiles as she sits with her sons, Princes Harry, foreground, and William, on the steps of the Royal Palace on the island of Mallorca, Spain, Aug. 9, 1987. (AP Photo/John Redman, File)
            
              FILE - Princess Diana sits alone in front of the Taj Mahal in Agra, India on Feb. 11, 1992. Above all, there was shock. That’s the word people use over and over again when they remember Princess Diana’s death in a Paris car crash 25 years ago this week. The woman the world watched grow from a shy teenage nursery school teacher into a glamorous celebrity who comforted AIDS patients and campaigned for landmine removal couldn’t be dead at the age of 36, could she? (AP Photo/Udo Weitz, File)
            
              FILE - Diana, Princess of Wales wearing a black pleated chiffon dress, with floating side panel, by Christina Stamboulian, during a party given at the Serpentine Gallery in London in 1996. Above all, there was shock. That’s the word people use over and over again when they remember Princess Diana’s death in a Paris car crash 25 years ago this week. The woman the world watched grow from a shy teenage nursery school teacher into a glamorous celebrity who comforted AIDS patients and campaigned for landmine removal couldn’t be dead at the age of 36, could she? (AP Photo, PA, File)
            
              FILE - Britain's Princess of Wales, right, and the Duchess of York, hold on to their hats in windy condition while attending the running of the 1987 Derby at Epsom racecourse in England on Wednesday, June 3, 1987. (AP Photo, File)
            
              FILE - South African President Nelson Mandela, left, escorts Diana, Princess of Wales, during a courtesy visit to Mandela while visiting her brother, Earl Spencer, in Cape Town on March 17, 1997. Above all, there was shock. That’s the word people use over and over again when they remember Princess Diana’s death in a Paris car crash 25 years ago this week. The woman the world watched grow from a shy teenage nursery school teacher into a glamorous celebrity who comforted AIDS patients and campaigned for landmine removal couldn’t be dead at the age of 36, could she? (AP Photo/Sasa Kralj, File)
            
              FILE - Diana, Princess of Wales, wearing protective gear on Wednesday Jan. 15, 1997 during a briefing by the British land-mine sweeping organisation Halo Trust in Huambo, central Angola, one of the most densely mined areas in the country. (AP Photo/Giovanni Diffidenti, File)
            
              FILE - Britain's Princess Diana touches the leg of a leprosy patient at the Anandaban Leprosy Hospital in the south of Katmandu, March 4, 1993, the third day of the princess's five-day visit to Nepal. The hospital is owned by Leprosy Mission International, a London-based organization, of which the Princess of Wales is patron. (AP Photo/Binod Joshi, File)
            
              FILE - Britain's Princess Diana wearing a white dress, races ahead during the mother's race, held during a sports day for Wetherby school, where her son Prince William is a pupil on Tuesday, June 28, 1989. Above all, there was shock. That’s the word people use over and over again when they remember Princess Diana’s death in a Paris car crash 25 years ago this week. The woman the world watched grow from a shy teenage nursery school teacher into a glamorous celebrity who comforted AIDS patients and campaigned for landmine removal couldn’t be dead at the age of 36, could she? (AP Photo, File)
            
              FILE - The Prince and Princess of Wales, Prince Charles and Princess Diana leave St. Mary's Hospital in Paddington, London on Sept. 16, 1984 with their new baby son, Prince Harry who was born on Sept. 15. (AP Photo, File)
            
              FILE - Princess Diana, the Princess of Wales, shakes hands and talks to school children during her visit to a new shopping centre at Aylesbury, Bucks., England on March 2, 1983. Above all, there was shock. That’s the word people use over and over again when they remember Princess Diana’s death in a Paris car crash 25 years ago this week. The woman the world watched grow from a shy teenage nursery school teacher into a glamorous celebrity who comforted AIDS patients and campaigned for landmine removal couldn’t be dead at the age of 36, could she? (AP Photo/Dave Caulkin, File)
            
              FILE - Britain's Prince Charles and his bride Diana, Princess of Wales, are shown on their wedding day on the balcony of Buckingham Palace in London, July 29, 1981. (AP Photo, File)
            
              FILE - Britain's Prince Charles and Lady Diana Spencer pose for a photo following the announcement of their engagement on Feb. 24, 1981. Above all, there was shock. That’s the word people use over and over again when they remember Princess Diana’s death in a Paris car crash 25 years ago this week. The woman the world watched grow from a shy teenage nursery school teacher into a glamorous celebrity who comforted AIDS patients and campaigned for landmine removal couldn’t be dead at the age of 36, could she? (AP Photo/Pool, File)
            
              FILE - Lady Diana Spencer gets out of her car near her flat in the Earls Court district of London, around Nov. 1980. Above all, there was shock. That’s the word people use over and over again when they remember Princess Diana’s death in a Paris car crash 25 years ago this week. The woman the world watched grow from a shy teenage nursery school teacher into a glamorous celebrity who comforted AIDS patients and campaigned for landmine removal couldn’t be dead at the age of 36, could she?  (AP Photo, File)
            
              FILE - Diana, Princess of Wales, talks to amputees, Tuesday Jan. 14, 1997, at the the Neves Bendinha Orthopedic Workshop in the outskirts of Luanda. Sitting on Diana's lap is 13-year-old Sandra Thijica who lost her left leg to a land-mine while working the land with her mother in Saurimo, eastern Angola, in 1994. Princess Diana is visiting Angola in an effort to create awareness about land-mines. (AP Photo/Joao Silva, File)
            
              FILE - Britain's Diana, Princess of Wales, is pictured during an evening reception given by the West German President Richard von Weizsacker in honour of the British Royal guests in the Godesberg Redoute in Bonn, Germany Monday, Nov. 2, 1987. Above all, there was shock. That’s the word people use over and over again when they remember Princess Diana’s death in a Paris car crash 25 years ago this week. The woman the world watched grow from a shy teenage nursery school teacher into a glamorous celebrity who comforted AIDS patients and campaigned for landmine removal couldn’t be dead at the age of 36, could she? (AP Photo/Herman Knippertz, File)
            FILE - Diana, Princess of Wales, talks with AIDS patient Wayne Taylor at the Casey House AIDS hospice in Toronto Oct. 26, 1991. Above all, there was shock. That's the word people use over and over again when they remember Princess Diana's death in a Paris car crash 25 years ago this week. The woman the world watched grow from a shy teenage nursery school teacher into a glamorous celebrity who comforted AIDS patients and campaigned for landmine removal couldn't be dead at the age of 36, could she? (AP Photo/Hans Deryk, File) FILE - Princess Diana pauses at the bed of a seriously injured man as she visits Cook County Hospital in Chicago June 5, 1996. Above all, there was shock. That's the word people use over and over again when they remember Princess Diana's death in a Paris car crash 25 years ago this week. The woman the world watched grow from a shy teenage nursery school teacher into a glamorous celebrity who comforted AIDS patients and campaigned for landmine removal couldn't be dead at the age of 36, could she? (Beth A. Keiser, Pool Photo via AP, File) FILE - Princess Diana makes her entrance at the awards gala of the Council of Fashion Designers of America at New York's Lincoln Center, Jan. 30, 1995. (AP Photo/Clark Jones, file) FILE - In this Nov. 9, 1985 photo provided by the Ronald Reagan Library, actor John Travolta dances with Princess Diana at a White House dinner in Washington. Above all, there was shock. That's the word people use over and over again when they remember Princess Diana's death in a Paris car crash 25 years ago this week. The woman the world watched grow from a shy teenage nursery school teacher into a glamorous celebrity who comforted AIDS patients and campaigned for landmine removal couldn't be dead at the age of 36, could she? (AP Photo/Ronald Reagan Library, File) FILE - Princess Diana smiles in the reception line as she greets guests at a fund raiser for breast cancer research at the National Building Museum Tuesday night, Sept. 24, 1996 in Washington. From left are Princess Diana, Washington Post owner Katherine Graham, Vogue Magazine Editor-in-Chief Anna Wintour, designer Ralph Lauren and Georgetown University President Rev. Leo J. O'Donovan. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File) FILE - Mother Teresa, left, walks with Diana, Princess of Wales, after receiving a visit from her June 18, 1997, in New York. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews, File)