Device taps brain waves to help paralyzed man communicate


              In this Friday, June 7, 2019 photo provided by the University of California, San Francisco,  Dr. Edward Chang, right, and postdoctoral scholar David Moses work at UCSF's Mission Bay campus. “Most of us take for granted how easily we communicate through speech,” says Chang, a neurosurgeon UCSF. “It’s exciting to think we’re at the very beginning of a new chapter, a new field” to ease the devastation of patients who lost that ability. (Noah Berger/UCSF via AP)
            
              In this 2020 photo provided by the University of California, San Francisco, researcher David Moses works with clinical trial participant "BRAVO 1" to record brain activity while he attempted to produce words and sentences. Fifteen years ago, he suffered a brain-stem stroke that caused widespread paralysis and robbed him of speech. (Todd Dubnicoff/UCSF via AP)
            
              In this 2017 photo provided by the University of California, San Francisco, neurosurgeon Dr. Edward Chang is reflected in a computer monitor displaying brain scans as he performs surgery at UCSF. In a medical first, researchers, led by Chang, harnessed the brain waves of a man paralyzed and unable to speak for 15 years - and turned what he intended to say into sentences on a computer screen. (Barbara Ries/UCSF via AP)