Climate reshapes life for tenacious gannets on Quebec isle


              A northern gannet feather floats on the Gulf of St. Lawrence near Bonaventure Island off the coast of Quebec, Canada's Gaspe Peninsula, Tuesday, Sept. 13, 2022. Scientists are tracking the threats to seabirds from climate change, overfishing and other perils wrought by humans. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
            
              A gray juvenile northern gannet sits next to a dead northern gannet on Bonaventure Island in the Gulf of St. Lawrence off the coast of Quebec, Canada's Gaspe Peninsula, Tuesday, Sept. 13, 2022. If the mate on the nest gets too weak from hunger, it may fly off for food, too, leaving the young one to starve or to wander from the nest and risk being killed by an adult. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
            
              A northern gannet lands among the colony on Bonaventure Island in the Gulf of St. Lawrence off the coast of Quebec, Canada's Gaspe Peninsula, Tuesday, Sept. 13, 2022. The small island is close to shore and home to over 100,000 gannets in the breeding season, making them the world's second largest northern gannet colony. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
            
              White adults and gray juvenile northern gannets nest on Bonaventure Island in the Gulf of St. Lawrence off the coast of Quebec, Canada's Gaspe Peninsula, Tuesday, Sept. 13, 2022. The small island is close to shore and home to over 100,000 gannets in the breeding season, making them the world's second largest northern gannet colony. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
            
              The black tipped wings of a northern gannet are seen as it flies through fog engulfing Perce Rock in Perce, Quebec, Canada, Monday, Sept. 12, 2022. Experts say there's little question that global warming is reshaping the lives of northern gannets by driving fish deeper into cooler waters and sometimes beyond their reach. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
            
              Northern gannets fly near Bonaventure Island in the Gulf of St. Lawrence off the coast of Quebec, Canada's Gaspe Peninsula, Tuesday, Sept. 13, 2022. Experts say there's little question that global warming is reshaping the lives of northern gannets by driving fish deeper into cooler waters and sometimes beyond their reach. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
            
              The northern gannets of Bonaventure Island go deep in the art and culture of Quebec’s Gaspe Peninsula, as seen in this painting by Mylene Henry outside her gallery, Atelier-Galerie Mylene Henry, in Perce, Quebec, Canada, Wednesday, Sept. 14, 2022. (Mylene Henry via AP)
            
              Early morning sun shines on northern gannets as they nest in the cliffs of Bonaventure Island in the Gulf of St. Lawrence off the coast of Quebec, Canada's Gaspe Peninsula, Monday, Sept. 12, 2022. The small island is close to shore and home to over 100,000 gannets in the breeding season, making them the world's second largest northern gannet colony. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
            
              Tourists take selfies and photograph Perce Rock in Perce, Quebec, Canada, Tuesday, Sept. 13, 2022, during a Croisiere Julien Cloutier boat tour. When boats bring visitors to the island, park employees corral them to explain the trails and what they can and cannot do. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
            
              A seal looks our from a rock along the coast of Bonaventure Island in the Gulf of St. Lawrence off the coast of Quebec, Canada's Gaspe Peninsula, Monday, Sept. 12, 2022. Seals frequent the rocks and shore and whales are a common sight. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
            
              Fog reaches an observation tower on the eastern side of Bonaventure Island in the Gulf of St. Lawrence off the coast of Quebec, Canada's Gaspe Peninsula, Monday, Sept. 12, 2022. Scientists are tracking the threats to seabirds from climate change, overfishing and other perils wrought by humans. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
            
              A northern gannet feeds its young bird with regurgitated food on Bonaventure Island in the Gulf of St. Lawrence off the coast of Quebec, Canada's Gaspe Peninsula, Monday, Sept. 12, 2022. The birds arrive in April, lay their eggs in May and tend them until they hatch more than 40 days later. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
            
              Northern gannets gather with the colony on Bonaventure Island in the Gulf of St. Lawrence off the coast of Quebec, Canada's Gaspe Peninsula, Monday, Sept. 12, 2022. Many species, though, are hard to study because they live in a marine wilderness or are scattered. But not the northern gannets that breed on the island. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
            
              Feathers form a northern gannet colony catch on vegetation on Bonaventure Island in the Gulf of St. Lawrence off the coast of Quebec, Canada's Gaspe Peninsula, Monday, Sept. 12, 2022. Scientists are tracking the threats to seabirds from climate change, overfishing and other perils wrought by humans. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
            
              A northern gannet chick looks out from a nest on Bonaventure Island in the Gulf of St. Lawrence off the coast of Quebec, Canada's Gaspe Peninsula, Monday, Sept. 12, 2022. The birds arrive in April, lay their eggs in May and tend them until they hatch more than 40 days later. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
            
              Scientific identification tags are seen on the legs of a northern gannet on Bonaventure Island in the Gulf of St. Lawrence off the coast of Quebec, Canada's Gaspe Peninsula, Monday, Sept. 12, 2022. Many seabird species are hard to study because they live in a marine wilderness or are scattered. But not the northern gannets that breed on Bonaventure Island off Canada's Gaspe Peninsula. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
            
              Northern gannets soar along the cliffs of Bonaventure Island in the Gulf of St. Lawrence off the coast of Quebec, Canada's Gaspe Peninsula, Monday, Sept. 12, 2022. The small island is close to shore and home to over 100,000 gannets in the breeding season, making them the world's second largest northern gannet colony. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
            
              A pair of northern gannets nest together on Bonaventure Island in the Gulf of St. Lawrence off the coast of Quebec, Canada's Gaspe Peninsula, Monday, Sept. 12, 2022. Over winter, northern gannets are solitary birds that live widely dispersed on the water — along the Atlantic coast from Maine to Florida, some even in the Gulf of Mexico. But mates reunite year after year on their breeding grounds, for 15 years or so, producing one chick each season. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
            
              A northern gannet walks along the edge of the colony on Bonaventure Island in the Gulf of St. Lawrence off the coast of Quebec, Canada's Gaspe Peninsula, Monday, Sept. 12, 2022. Experts say there's little question that global warming is reshaping the lives of northern gannets by driving fish deeper into cooler waters and sometimes beyond their reach. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
            
              A northern gannet flies above the colony on Bonaventure Island in the Gulf of St. Lawrence off the coast of Quebec, Canada's Gaspe Peninsula, Tuesday, Sept. 13, 2022. The small island is close to shore and home to over 100,000 gannets in the breeding season, making them the world's second largest northern gannet colony. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
            
              A person takes a photograph of Bonaventure Island across the Gulf of St. Lawrence from Perce, Quebec, Canada, at sunset, Thursday, Sept. 15, 2022. The small island is close to shore and home to over 100,000 gannets in the breeding season, making them the world's second largest northern gannet colony. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
            
              A northern gannet shakes off water as it bathes in the Gulf of St. Lawrence near Bonaventure Island off the coast of Quebec, Canada's Gaspe Peninsula, Tuesday, Sept. 13, 2022. Experts say there's little question that global warming is reshaping the lives of northern gannets by driving fish deeper into cooler waters and sometimes beyond their reach. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
            
              A northern gannet takes flight from the Gulf of St. Lawrence near Bonaventure Island off the coast of Quebec, Canada's Gaspe Peninsula, Tuesday, Sept. 13, 2022. Experts say there's little question that global warming is reshaping the lives of northern gannets by driving fish deeper into cooler waters and sometimes beyond their reach. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
            
              A northern gannet glides above water reflecting the red cliffs of Bonaventure Island in the Gulf of St. Lawrence off the coast of Quebec, Canada's Gaspe Peninsula, Monday, Sept. 12, 2022. Experts say there's little question that global warming is reshaping the lives of northern gannets by driving fish deeper into cooler waters and sometimes beyond their reach. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
            
              Northern gannets dive for fish near Perce Rock just after sunrise in Perce, Quebec, Canada, Thursday, Sept. 15, 2022. Experts say there's little question that global warming is reshaping the lives of northern gannets by driving fish deeper into cooler waters and sometimes beyond their reach. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
            
              A pair of northern gannets greet each other by touching beaks on Bonaventure Island in the Gulf of St. Lawrence off the coast of Quebec, Canada's Gaspe Peninsula, Tuesday, Sept. 13, 2022. Scientists are tracking the threats to seabirds, like gannets, from climate change, overfishing and other perils wrought by humans. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)