California tenants rise up, demand rent caps from city halls


              Kim Carlson, from left, and her two grandsons Thomas Heidt, 12, and Treveyon Carlson, 9, pose for a photograph outside her apartment at the Delta Pines complex, Friday, Nov. 4, 2022, in Antioch, Calif. Despite a landmark renter protection law approved by California legislators in 2019, tenants across the country’s most populous state are taking to ballot boxes and city councils to demand even more safeguards. They want to crack down on tenant harassment, shoddy living conditions and unresponsive landlords that are usually faceless corporations. (AP Photo/Godofredo A. Vásquez)
            
              Kim Carlson poses for a photograph at her apartment at the Delta Pines apartment complex, Friday, Nov. 4, 2022, in Antioch, Calif. Despite a landmark renter protection law approved by California legislators in 2019, tenants across the country’s most populous state are taking to ballot boxes and city councils to demand even more safeguards. They want to crack down on tenant harassment, shoddy living conditions and unresponsive landlords that are usually faceless corporations. (AP Photo/Godofredo A. Vásquez)
            
              A padlock and chain restricts access to a basketball court at Delta Pines apartment complex, Friday, Nov. 4, 2022, in Antioch, Calif. Kim Carlson, who lives in the complex, says the court, swimming pool and recreational room are off-limits to tenants. Despite a landmark renter protection law approved by California legislators in 2019, tenants across the country’s most populous state are taking to ballot boxes and city councils to demand even more safeguards. They want to crack down on tenant harassment, shoddy living conditions and unresponsive landlords that are usually faceless corporations. (AP Photo/Godofredo A. Vásquez)
            
              Thomas Heidt, left, and Treveyon Carlson, right, race to the playground at the Delta Pines apartment complex, Friday, Nov. 4, 2022, in Antioch, Calif. Despite a landmark renter protection law approved by California legislators in 2019, tenants across the country’s most populous state are taking to ballot boxes and city councils to demand even more safeguards. They want to crack down on tenant harassment, shoddy living conditions and unresponsive landlords that are usually faceless corporations. (AP Photo/Godofredo A. Vásquez)
            
              Photos of the mayor and council members hang on a wall inside City Hall in Antioch, Calif., Friday, Nov. 4, 2022. The two council members who voted in favor of rent stabilization are up for re-election Tuesday, with one of them, Tamisha Torres-Walker, facing a former council member she narrowly beat two years ago. The local newspaper endorsed Joy Motts and called Torres-Walker, who was homeless as a young adult, polarizing. If either member loses her seat, the rent ordinance could be repealed. (AP Photo/Godofredo A. Vásquez)
            
              Kim Carlson, right, hugs her 9-year old grandson Treveyon Carlson at her apartment at the Delta Pines complex, Friday, Nov. 4, 2022, in Antioch, Calif. Despite a landmark renter protection law approved by California legislators in 2019, tenants across the country’s most populous state are taking to ballot boxes and city councils to demand even more safeguards. They want to crack down on tenant harassment, shoddy living conditions and unresponsive landlords that are usually faceless corporations. (AP Photo/Godofredo A. Vásquez)
            
              Alliance of Californians for Community Empowerment (ACCE) community organizer Devin Williams, left, talks with Kim Carlson and her two grandsons while looking at the two buildings which were destroyed by a fire in March at the Delta Pines apartment complex, Friday, Nov. 4, 2022, in Antioch, Calif. Despite a landmark renter protection law approved by California legislators in 2019, tenants across the country’s most populous state are taking to ballot boxes and city councils to demand even more safeguards. They want to crack down on tenant harassment, shoddy living conditions and unresponsive landlords that are usually faceless corporations. (AP Photo/Godofredo A. Vásquez)
            
              An uncovered electrical outlet can be seen inside Kim Carlson's apartment at the Delta Pines apartment complex, Friday, Nov. 4, 2022, in Antioch, Calif. Despite a landmark renter protection law approved by California legislators in 2019, tenants across the country’s most populous state are taking to ballot boxes and city councils to demand even more safeguards. They want to crack down on tenant harassment, shoddy living conditions and unresponsive landlords that are usually faceless corporations. (AP Photo/Godofredo A. Vásquez)
            
              Kim Carlson explains how the sewage line outside her front door constantly backs up due to plumbing issues at the Delta Pines apartment complex, Friday, Nov. 4, 2022, in Antioch, Calif. Despite a landmark renter protection law approved by California legislators in 2019, tenants across the country’s most populous state are taking to ballot boxes and city councils to demand even more safeguards. They want to crack down on tenant harassment, shoddy living conditions and unresponsive landlords that are usually faceless corporations. (AP Photo/Godofredo A. Vásquez)
            
              Kim Carlson flips through a binder of documents chronicling grievances with the Delta Pines apartment complex, Friday, Nov. 4, 2022, in Antioch, Calif. Despite a landmark renter protection law approved by California legislators in 2019, tenants across the country’s most populous state are taking to ballot boxes and city councils to demand even more safeguards. They want to crack down on tenant harassment, shoddy living conditions and unresponsive landlords that are usually faceless corporations. (AP Photo/Godofredo A. Vásquez)
            
              Kim Carlson pulls back a curtain to show belongings she keeps on her terrace she says were destroyed by flooding from a sewage backup years ago at her home in Delta Pines apartment complex, Friday, Nov. 4, 2022, in Antioch, Calif. Despite a landmark renter protection law approved by California legislators in 2019, tenants across the country’s most populous state are taking to ballot boxes and city councils to demand even more safeguards. They want to crack down on tenant harassment, shoddy living conditions and unresponsive landlords that are usually faceless corporations. (AP Photo/Godofredo A. Vásquez)
            
              Alliance of Californians for Community Empowerment (ACCE) community organizer Devin Williams poses for a photograph in front of the two buildings which were destroyed by a fire in March at the Delta Pines apartment complex, Friday, Nov. 4, 2022, in Antioch, Calif. Despite a landmark renter protection law approved by California legislators in 2019, tenants across the country’s most populous state are taking to ballot boxes and city councils to demand even more safeguards. They want to crack down on tenant harassment, shoddy living conditions and unresponsive landlords that are usually faceless corporations. (AP Photo/Godofredo A. Vásquez)
            
              Two buildings which were destroyed in a March fire remain at the Delta Pines apartment complex, Friday, Nov. 4, 2022, in Antioch, Calif. Despite a landmark renter protection law approved by California legislators in 2019, tenants across the country’s most populous state are taking to ballot boxes and city councils to demand even more safeguards. They want to crack down on tenant harassment, shoddy living conditions and unresponsive landlords that are usually faceless corporations. (AP Photo/Godofredo A. Vásquez)
            
              Kim Carlson, third from left, her two grandsons and community organizer Devin Williams, right, walk around the Delta Pines apartment complex, Friday, Nov. 4, 2022, in Antioch, Calif. Despite a landmark renter protection law approved by California legislators in 2019, tenants across the country’s most populous state are taking to ballot boxes and city councils to demand even more safeguards. They want to crack down on tenant harassment, shoddy living conditions and unresponsive landlords that are usually faceless corporations. (AP Photo/Godofredo A. Vásquez)
            
              Kim Carlson, from left, and her two grandsons Thomas Heidt, 12, and Treveyon Carlson, 9, pose for a photograph outside her apartment at the Delta Pines complex, Friday, Nov. 4, 2022, in Antioch, Calif. Despite a landmark renter protection law approved by California legislators in 2019, tenants across the country’s most populous state are taking to ballot boxes and city councils to demand even more safeguards. They want to crack down on tenant harassment, shoddy living conditions and unresponsive landlords that are usually faceless corporations. (AP Photo/Godofredo A. Vásquez)