Brazil’s new president works to reverse Amazon deforestation


              FILE - An area of forest on fire near a logging area in the Transamazonica highway region, in the municipality of Humaita, Amazonas state, Brazil, Sept. 17, 2022. In a victory speech Sunday, Oct. 30, Brazil's president-elect Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva promised to reverse a surge in deforestation in the Amazon rainforest. (AP Photo/Edmar Barros, file)
            
              FILE - Indigenous leader Sonia Guajajara from the Guajajara ethnic group poses for a photo during a protest against Violence, illegal logging, mining and ranching, and to demand government protection for their reserves, one day before the celebration of "Amazon Day", in Sao Paulo, Brazil, Sunday, Sept. 4, 2022. (AP Photo/Andre Penner, file)
            
              FILE - A section of Amazon rainforest stands next to soy fields in Belterra, Para state, Brazil, on Nov. 30, 2019. Brazil's President-elect Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva named Marina Silva as environment minister for his incoming government, indicating he will prioritize cracking down on illegal deforestation in the Amazon. (AP Photo/Leo Correa, File)
            
              FILE - Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva stands next to Indigenous leader Cacique Raoni at the Planalto Palace after he was sworn in as new president in Brasilia, Brazil, Sunday, Jan. 1, 2023. Environmentalists, Indigenous people and voters sympathetic to their causes were important to Luiz Inácio da Silva's election to a third term as Brazil's president.(AP Photo/Eraldo Peres, file)
            
              FILE - Kayapo leader Raoni Metuktire, from left, Joenia Wapichana, the first indigenous congresswoman to be elected to Brazil's lower house, and indigenous leader Sonia Guajajara, attend a meeting with lawmakers to discuss land rights and the Chamber of Deputies' role in the protection of the environment in Brasilia, Brazil, Thursday, April 25, 2019. Environmentalists, Indigenous people and voters sympathetic to their causes were important to Luiz Inácio da Silva's election to a third term as Brazil's president. (AP Photo/Eraldo Peres, file)
            
              FILE - Trees lie in an area of recent deforestation identified by agents of the Chico Mendes Institute in the Chico Mendes Extractive Reserve, Acre state, Brazil, Thursday, Dec. 8, 2022. Brazil's President-elect Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva named Marina Silva as environment minister for his incoming government, indicating he will prioritize cracking down on illegal deforestation in the Amazon. (AP Photo/Eraldo Peres)
            
              FILE - Brazil's former President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva, right, and congressional candidate Marina Silva, campaign in Sao Paulo, Brazil, Monday, Sept. 12, 2022. Environmentalists, Indigenous people and voters sympathetic to their causes were important to Lula's narrow victory over former President Jair Bolsonaro. Now Lula is seeking to fulfill campaign pledges he made to them on a wide range of issues, from expanding Indigenous territories to halting a surge in illegal deforestation. (AP Photo/Andre Penner, file)
            (AP Illustration/Peter Hamlin)