Boris Johnson’s mounting trouble is treasure for satirists


              Political cartoonist  Martin Rowson draws a cartoon of Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson in his studio in London, Monday, Jan. 24, 2022. So the bad news besetting British Prime Minister Boris Johnson over allegations of lockdown-breaching government parties has been good news for Britain's humorists, producing an outpouring of satirical responses. Political cartoonist Martin Rowson says mockery is one of the trade-offs in democratic societies between government and governed: “They have power and we have the right to laugh at them.” (AP Photo/Frank Augstein)
            
              Political cartoonist  Martin Rowson draws a Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson cartoon in his studio in London, Monday, Jan. 24, 2022. So the bad news besetting British Prime Minister Boris Johnson over allegations of lockdown-breaching government parties has been good news for Britain's humorists, producing an outpouring of satirical responses. Political cartoonist Martin Rowson says mockery is one of the trade-offs in democratic societies between government and governed: “They have power and we have the right to laugh at them.” (AP Photo/Frank Augstein)
            
              Political cartoonist Martin Rowson shows Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson cartoons in his studio in London, Monday, Jan. 24, 2022. So the bad news besetting British Prime Minister Boris Johnson over allegations of lockdown-breaching government parties has been good news for Britain's humorists, producing an outpouring of satirical responses. Political cartoonist Martin Rowson says mockery is one of the trade-offs in democratic societies between government and governed: “They have power and we have the right to laugh at them.” (AP Photo/Frank Augstein)
            
              In this screen shot taken from video, Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson speaks during Prime Minister's Questions in the House of Commons, London, Wednesday, Jan. 19, 2022.  Johnson faced a grilling from opponents in Parliament as well as a threat from his own party's lawmakers over a string of lockdown-flouting government parties. Conservative legislators are judging whether to trigger a no-confidence vote in Johnson over the “partygate” scandal. Johnson and loyal ministers are trying to bring rebels back into line before they submit letters to a party committee calling for the vote. (House of Commons/PA via AP)
            
              Political cartoonist Martin Rowson draws a cartoon on Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson in his studio in London, Monday, Jan. 24, 2022. So the bad news besetting British Prime Minister Boris Johnson over allegations of lockdown-breaching government parties has been good news for Britain's humorists, producing an outpouring of satirical responses. Political cartoonist Martin Rowson says mockery is one of the trade-offs in democratic societies between government and governed: “They have power and we have the right to laugh at them.” (AP Photo/Frank Augstein)
            
              Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson jogs in central London, early Monday, Jan. 24, 2022. (Aaron Chown/PA via AP)
            
              Martin Rowson shows Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson cartoons as he poses for a photographer in his studio in London, Monday, Jan. 24, 2022. So the bad news besetting British Prime Minister Boris Johnson over allegations of lockdown-breaching government parties has been good news for Britain's humorists, producing an outpouring of satirical responses. Political cartoonist Martin Rowson says mockery is one of the trade-offs in democratic societies between government and governed: “They have power and we have the right to laugh at them.” (AP Photo/Frank Augstein)