Arizona national forest campsites

(Flickr Photo/Coconino National Forest) (Photo: Tonto National Forest twitter @TontoForest) (Flickr Photo/Coconino National Forest) (Flickr Photo/Coconino National Forest) (Flickr Photo/Coconino National Forest) (Tonto National Forest Photo) The Purple Mountain site at Fossil Creek Wild and Scenic River offers a short walk to the creek. Dense trees provide plentiful shade with many grassy picnic spots. There are several shallow pools with gravel bottoms and easy entry points. It's a beautiful, relaxing area perfect for kicking back in a hammock to read a book, take a siesta, or simply enjoy nature. With long banks to explore, it's easy to find your own little slice of heaven.   Look for bits of history from the days when the Childs-Irving Hydroelectric Facilities provided power to nearby communities. The facilities were decommissioned and removed between 2005 and 2008, but many structures and foundations remain. The Purple Mountain area was originally a work camp in 1908 for workers who constructed the nearby hydroelectric power plant facilities.   Increasing popularity has led to the Coconino and Tonto National Forests to implement a parking permit reservation system in 2016. As of 2017, permits are required April 1 to October 1. Visit Fossil Creek Wild and Scenic River for current information and to reserve a permit.  Photo taken by Deborah Lee Soltesz, April 10, 2017. Credit USFS Coconino National Forest. Learn more about visiting Fossil Creek Wild and Scenic River managed by the Coconino National Forest. (Flickr Photo/Coconino National Forest) Pine Flat Campground in scenic Oak Creek Canyon is one of the Forest's most popular campgrounds. The scenery is unmatched, the stream is stocked with trout. If the fishing aren't biting, you can always go swimming, hiking or birdwatching. Slide Rock State Park (listed in Life Magazine as one of the nation's ten best swimming holes) and the thriving resort town of Sedona are only a short drive away. It comes as no surprise this area is so popular.                                              Learn more about the Pine Flat Campground, the Red Rock Ranger District, and the Coconino National Forest. Pine Flat Campground in scenic Oak Creek Canyon is one of the Forest's most popular campgrounds. The scenery is unmatched, the stream is stocked with trout. If the fishing aren't biting, you can always go swimming, hiking or birdwatching. Slide Rock State Park (listed in Life Magazine as one of the nation's ten best swimming holes) and the thriving resort town of Sedona are only a short drive away. It comes as no surprise this area is so popular.                                              Learn more about the Pine Flat Campground, the Red Rock Ranger District, and the Coconino National Forest. Nearby Upper and Lower Lake Mary, Ashurst, Marshall and Kinnikinick lakes serve as a recreational focus for this campground. All are stocked with fish including trout, bass, and channel catfish. Upper Lake Mary is popular with power boaters (there's no motor limit), and Ashurst attracts a following of windsurfers along with its anglers and boaters. Those whose interest in the out of doors goes beyond watersports might consider these sites for the wildlife watching they offer. The lakes around these forested campgrounds are used as a stopover for migrating waterfowl, a wintering site for rare bald eagles, and a feeding ground for resident ospreys. The area is home to a considerable number of elk and mule deer, too. Pinegrove Campground is spread out through a cool stand of pines bordered by high country meadows. Access to the campground is via a short spur off Forest Highway 3. Supplies are available at convenience stores along the highway and in Flagstaff, about 20 miles away.                                         Learn more about the Pine Grove Campground, the Flagstaff Ranger District, and the Coconino National Forest.