AP

GOP Sen. Johnson faces challenge in battleground Wisconsin

Nov 8, 2022, 4:00 AM | Updated: 5:06 pm

Wisconsin Republican Sen. Ron Johnson speaks at a rally with supporters Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2022, in ...

Wisconsin Republican Sen. Ron Johnson speaks at a rally with supporters Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2022, in Waukesha, Wis. Johnson and Democrat Mandela Barnes are honing closing arguments in a Wisconsin race that could be critical in which party controls the U.S. Senate. (AP Photo/Morry Gash)

(AP Photo/Morry Gash)

MADISON, Wis. (AP) — Republican U.S. Sen. Ron Johnson sought to win a third term on Tuesday in battleground Wisconsin against Mandela Barnes, a Democrat hoping to make history as the state’s first Black senator.

Johnson, one of former President Donald Trump’s biggest backers, painted Barnes as “dangerous” and soft on crime, hitting on one of the GOP’s biggest campaign themes this cycle as it tries to win back control of the Senate.

Barnes, already the state’s first Black lieutenant governor, tried to make the race about abortion, highlighting Johnson’s long support for overturning Roe v. Wade.

Both Barnes and Johnson each attempted to paint the other as too radical for Wisconsin, a perennial swing state that Trump won in 2016 but lost in 2020 to President Joe Biden by slim margins each time.

“Other than hollow left-wing rhetoric, I’m not sure what he’s ever accomplished or what he has to offer,” Johnson said of Barnes in a debate.

Barnes emerged from his August primary victory with a slight lead in the polls, but saw that advantage disappear under a barrage of attack ads on the crime issue.

Like many Democrats, Barnes tried to make the race about abortion rights. Johnson, a longtime backer of making abortion illegal, tried to blunt the issue by saying he supported a state referendum to let voters decide the issue. But he opposed an effort by Democratic Gov. Tony Evers to make such a vote possible.

“Women’s lives and women’s health is on the line,” Barnes said in a debate.

Johnson once said he wouldn’t seek a third term, then explained his change of heart in January by saying he saw the country in peril.

Barnes went after him over a series of provocative statements that coincided with Johnson’s drift to the right during the Trump era, including Johnson’s disbelief in climate change; attempting to deliver fake Republican Electoral College ballots to then-Vice President Mike Pence on Jan. 6, 2021; saying that he would have been more fearful during that insurrection if the U.S. Capitol invaders had been Black Lives Matter protesters; and advocating for unproven and untested alternative treatments for COVID-19, such as mouthwash.

Barnes, in a debate, said Johnson wanted to “lie and distract and hide from his own record.”

Johnson called for the end of guaranteed money for Medicare and Social Security, two popular programs that American politicians usually steer clear from, calling it the only way to keep them viable. Biden himself went on the attack over those remarks, saying Johnson wants “to put Social Security and Medicare on the chopping block every year.”

Johnson portrayed Barnes as a rubber stamp of Biden and Democratic congressional leaders, saying their policies have led to high inflation and gas prices.

Barnes spent much of the race on the defensive explaining his earlier positions before he was a Senate candidate in support of ending cash bail and diverting funding for police departments. Barnes, 35, played up his middle class background, contrasting himself with Johnson, a 67-year-old millionaire who voted for a Trump tax bill that benefitted some of his wealthiest donors.

Roughly half of Wisconsin voters say the nation’s economy is the most pressing issue facing the country, according to AP VoteCast, an expansive survey of more than 3,200 voters in the state.

Nearly all the state’s voters say inflation was a factor in how they cast their ballots, with roughly half naming it as the single most important factor. Among those who named inflation as a factor in how they voted, nearly half say the rising costs of groceries and food were most important.

___

Follow AP’s coverage of the elections at: https://apnews.com/hub/2022-midterm-elections

Check out https://apnews.com/hub/explaining-the-elections to learn more about the issues and factors at play in the 2022 midterm elections.

Copyright © The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

AP

President Joe Biden speaks at a campaign rally Saturday, March 9, 2024, at Pullman Yards in Atlanta...

Associated Press

US shoots down ‘nearly all’ Iran-launched attack drones as Biden vows support for Israel’s defense

Joe Biden cut short a weekend stay at his beach house to meet with his national security team as Iran launched an attack against Israel.

1 day ago

Protesters in Phoenix shout as they join thousands marching around the Arizona state Capitol after ...

Associated Press

Abortion ruling supercharges Arizona to be an especially important swing state

A ruling this week instituting a near-total abortion ban supercharged Arizona's role, turning it into the most critical battleground.

2 days ago

Former President Donald Trump, center, appears in court for his arraignment, Tuesday, April 4, 2023...

Associated Press

Manhattan court searching for jurors to hear first-ever criminal case against a former president

Jury selection is set to start Monday in former President Donald Trump's hush money case — the first trial of the presumptive nominee.

2 days ago

Emergency personnel arrive on the scene after a  an 18-wheeler crashed into the Texas Department of...

Associated Press

1 dead and 13 injured in semitrailer crash at a Texas public safety office, with the driver jailed

A driver rammed an 18-wheeler though the front of a building where his renewal for a commercial driver’s license had been rejected.

2 days ago

Republican presidential candidate former President Donald Trump speaks at a Get Out The Vote rally ...

Associated Press

Trump pushes Arizona lawmakers to ‘remedy’ state abortion ruling that he says ‘went too far’

Donald Trump urged Arizona lawmakers on Friday to swiftly “remedy” the state court ruling allowing prosecutors to enforce an abortion ban.

2 days ago

Biden to require more gun dealers to run background checks....

Associated Press

Biden administration will require thousands more gun dealers to run background checks on buyers

New Biden rule to require thousands more firearms dealers across the United States will have to run background checks on buyers.

3 days ago

Sponsored Articles

...

COLLINS COMFORT MASTERS

Here are 5 things Arizona residents need to know about their HVAC system

It's warming back up in the Valley, which means it's time to think about your air conditioning system's preparedness for summer.

...

Midwestern University

Midwestern University Clinics: transforming health care in the valley

Midwestern University, long a fixture of comprehensive health care education in the West Valley, is also a recognized leader in community health care.

(KTAR News Graphic)...

Boys & Girls Clubs

KTAR launches online holiday auction benefitting Boys & Girls Clubs of the Valley

KTAR is teaming up with The Boys & Girls Clubs of the Valley for a holiday auction benefitting thousands of Valley kids.

GOP Sen. Johnson faces challenge in battleground Wisconsin