Climate negotiations: 30 years of melting hope and US power

Nov 4, 2022, 12:34 AM | Updated: 12:46 am
FILE - The Utah State Capitol, rear, is shown behind an oil refinery on May 12, 2022, in Salt Lake ...

FILE - The Utah State Capitol, rear, is shown behind an oil refinery on May 12, 2022, in Salt Lake City. Once the world had hope that when nations got together they could stop climate change. Thirty years after leaders around the globe first got together to try, that hope has melted. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer, File)

(AP Photo/Rick Bowmer, File)

Thirty years ago there was hope that a warming world could clean up its act.

It didn’t.

The United States helped forge two historic agreements to curb climate change then torpedoed both when new political administrations took over. Rich and poor nations squabbled about who should do what. During that time Earth warmed even faster.

Hope melted, along with 36 trillion tons of ice, scientists calculate.

Since 1992, when world leaders first came together to address global warming, humanity has spewed more than a trillion tons of heat-trapping carbon dioxide from fossil fuels into the air. The world got 1.1 degrees (0.6 degrees Celsius) hotter.

As climate negotiators gather in Egypt to try to limit future warming to just a few more tenths of a degree long-time officials and historians see recurring themes in past efforts that still echo today. Those themes involve the outsized footprint of the United States and the tug-of-war between nations that got rich thanks to fossil fuels and yet-to-develop countries that feel disproportionate pain from climate change and are being told not to develop much coal, oil and natural gas.

“The U.S. has been the absolute dominant force throughout all of this,” said climate negotiations historian Joanna Depledge of the University of Cambridge in England. “I’m afraid the U.S. has been both the best and the worst thing, really, about negotiations.”

It started on a high note. In 1992, five years after a historic environmental agreement to ban ozone-munching chemicals, world leaders signed a treaty in Rio de Janeiro at the “Earth Summit. ” It started the formal United Nations process to negotiate dial back carbon emissions. The world recognized that climate change “is going to affect us all and we all have to deal with it,” recalled the first UN climate secretary, Michael Zammit Cutajar.

Oren Lyons, faithkeeper of the Turtle Clan of the Onondaga Nation in New York, decades later called it the greatest meeting he attended: “There was a huge feeling of well-being, of being able to do something … There was a lot of hope there.”

Inger Andersen, a young United Nations development official at the time, said the summit got three different programs going and nothing was going to stop them.

“I mean this was it. We fixed it,” recalled Andersen, now the executive director of the United Nations Environment Programme. “I mean that was it. It was amazing, right?”

The Cold War had just ended and “the global environment was seen as a way of bringing previously warring countries together,” said Depledge. “It was seen as a kind of benign, you know motherhood-and-apple-pie way of cooperating.”

“Yes it was naïve, but it could have been done,” Depledge said. “Such innovative, exciting proposals were put forward in the early years, which if they had been implemented, we would be in a so much better situation.”

That included an insurance fund for mass disaster idea that would have been just ideal for Pakistan’s devastating flood this summer that put one-third of the nation under water, Depledge said.

Running through negotiations was the idea of differentiated responsibilities, with developed countries taking the lead. The key country that had to accept this was the No. 1 emitter at the time: The United States.

“When I look back on that now, not just then but beyond then I see the negotiation very much as an effort to bring the U.S. on board and keep it on board, right through,” Cutajar said.

In 1997 in Kyoto, Japan, the United States negotiated a deal that would have developed nations reduce their heat-trapping gas emissions to 1990 levels and below. Cutajar had the most hope of his career. It was a step in the right direction that would be followed by even more steps, he figured.

“The flexibility that defines the Kyoto Protocol was very much designed in the USA,” he said.

“That optimism lasted for quite a long time … the real hammer blow to it all, was the decision by President (George) W. Bush” to scuttle the Kyoto deal, Depledge said. “It really did sound the very slow death knell of that all important legally binding treaty, which we had thought would be the beginning — the beginning of a long lasting solution to climate change.’

The Kyoto deal limped along, Cutajar said. Finally a new non-binding deal, where every country came up with its own emission targets, was forged in Paris in 2015, after a side agreement between the United States and China. Again, the U.S. took a leadership role. The Paris deal was delicately worded so that the Republican-controlled U.S. Senate wouldn’t need to ratify it.

Negotiators literally danced in celebration.

Again, a new Republican administration, this time the president was Donald Trump, pulled out of the deal. Then Joe Biden put the U.S. back in again and negotiations resume with the United States now balking about the idea of paying for the damage done to poorer countries that didn’t spew much carbon pollution, like Pakistan.

“U.S. continues to be a difficult but essential partner,” Cutajar said.

Longtime climate change activist Bill McKibben said “the one thing I couldn’t have predicted was how little our society would react when faced with a clear warning from scientists about the greatest danger we ever faced, that we would conspire to do almost nothing for 30 years. Chalk it up to the extraordinary work of the fossil fuel industry.”

Extensive academic and other research has credited the fossil fuel industry with slowing or stopping climate change fighting efforts, particularly in the United States.

Cutajar, long retired and living in Switzerland, no longer has that hope that blossomed in the 1990s.

“I can’t say I’m optimistic,” Cutajar said in an interview with The Associated Press. “The human race is not going to be wiped out, but there’s going to be displacement — movement of people — on a historical scale. There already is. There will be more.”

___

Follow AP’s climate and environment coverage at https://apnews.com/hub/climate-and-environment

___

Follow Seth Borenstein on Twitter at @borenbears

___

Associated Press climate and environmental coverage receives support from several private foundations. See more about AP’s climate initiative here. The AP is solely responsible for all content.

Copyright © The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


              FILE - A youth runs over what remains of the glacier, that lost most of its volume during the last years, on top of the Zugspitze mountain near Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Saturday, June 25, 2022. Once the world had hope that when nations got together they could stop climate change. Thirty years after leaders around the globe first got together to try, that hope has melted. (AP Photo/Michael Probst, File)
            
              FILE - Homes are surrounded by floodwaters in Jaffarabad, a district of Pakistan's southwestern Baluchistan province, Sept. 1, 2022. (AP Photo/Zahid Hussain, File)
            
              Trees stand in Usingen near Frankfurt, Germany, Thursday, Nov. 3, 2022. The COP27 U.N. Climate Summit is set to take place in Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt, beginning Sunday, Nov. 6. (AP Photo/Michael Probst)
            
              FILE - Activists display prints replicating solar panels during a rally to mark Earth Day at Lafayette Square, Washington, April 23, 2022. Once the world had hope that when nations got together they could stop climate change. Thirty years after leaders around the globe first got together to try, that hope has melted. (AP Photo/Gemunu Amarasinghe, File)
            
              Steam rises from the coal-fired power plant Niederaussem, Germany, Nov. 2, 2022. Once the world had hope that when nations got together they could stop climate change. Thirty years after leaders around the globe first got together to try, that hope has melted. (AP Photo/Michael Probst)
            
              FILE - In this Dec. 6, 2015, file photo, environmentalist activists form a human chain representing the peace sign and the spelling out "100% renewable", on the side line of the COP21, United Nations Climate Change Conference near the Eiffel Tower in Paris. (AP PhotoMichel Euler, File)
            
              FILE - Demonstrators from Extinction Rebellion holds placards at a protest about Loss and Damage to the earth during the COP26 Climate Change conference in Glasgow, Scotland, Nov. 7, 2021. Once the world had hope that when nations got together they could stop climate change. Thirty years after leaders around the globe first got together to try, that hope has melted. (AP Photo/Alastair Grant, File)
            
              FILE - Environmentalists and citizens hold banners calling for reduction of green house gas emissions in front of the Heian shrine in Kyoto, western Japan on Dec. 7, 1997.  The world has warmed by more than a degree and spewed a trillion tons of heat-trapping gases since that 1992 summit. (AP Photo/Katsumi Kasahara, File)
            
              FILE - Climate activists Elizabeth Wathuti, of Kenya, Vanessa Nakate, of Uganda, and Helena Gualinga of Ecuador attend the climate protest alongside the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, May 26, 2022. Once the world had hope that when nations got together they could stop climate change. Thirty years after leaders around the globe first got together to try, that hope has melted. (AP Photo/Evgeniy Maloletka, File)
            
              A bucket wheel excavator is mining coal at the Garzweiler open-cast coal mine in Luetzerath, Germany, Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2022. Once the world had hope that when nations got together they could stop climate change. Thirty years after leaders around the globe first got together to try, that hope has melted. (AP Photo/Michael Probst)
            
              FILE - Climate activists hold a demonstration through the venue of the COP26 U.N. Climate Summit in Glasgow, Scotland, Friday, Nov. 12, 2021. Once the world had hope that when nations got together they could stop climate change. Thirty years after leaders around the globe first got together to try, that hope has melted. (AP Photo/Alastair Grant, File)
            
              FILE - U.S. President George Bush is watched by first lady Barbara Bush as he signs the Earth Pledge at the Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro, June 12, 1992. The Earth Pledge says that each signer pledges to work to the best of his or her ability to protect the earth. (AP Photo/M. Frustino)
            
              FILE - President Joe Biden walks off after speaking during an event about the "Global Methane Pledge" at the COP26 U.N. Climate Summit, Nov. 2, 2021, in Glasgow, Scotland, as John Kerry, United States Special Presidential Envoy for Climate is seen taking the podium, as shown on the screen. Once the world had hope that when nations got together they could stop climate change. Thirty years after leaders around the globe first got together to try, that hope has melted. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)
            
              FILE - The Utah State Capitol, rear, is shown behind an oil refinery on May 12, 2022, in Salt Lake City. Once the world had hope that when nations got together they could stop climate change. Thirty years after leaders around the globe first got together to try, that hope has melted. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer, File)

AP

Laborers cheer at a fan festival at the Asian Town cricket stadium in Doha, Qatar, Friday, Nov. 25,...
Associated Press

On outskirts of Doha, laborers watch World Cup they built

DOHA, Qatar (AP) — Far from Doha’s luxury hotels and sprawling new World Cup stadiums, scores of South Asian workers poured into a cricket ground in the city’s sandy outskirts to enjoy the tournament they helped create. Unlike the official FIFA fan zone near Doha’s pristine corniche, this one has no $14 beer or foreign […]
8 hours ago
Residents line up for COVID-19 tests in Beijing, Saturday, Nov. 26, 2022. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)...
Associated Press

Xinjiang loosens some restrictions after lockdown protests

TAIPEI, Taiwan (AP) — Authorities in China’s western Xinjiang region opened up some neighborhoods in the capital of Urumqi on Saturday after residents held extraordinary late-night demonstrations against the city’s draconian “zero-COVID” lockdown that had lasted more than three months. The displays of public defiance were fanned by anger over a fire in an apartment […]
8 hours ago
FILE - Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis speaks during a news conference at the Broward County Courthouse i...
Associated Press

New state voter fraud units finding few cases from midterms

WASHINGTON (AP) — State-level law enforcement units created after the 2020 presidential election to investigate voter fraud are looking into scattered complaints more than two weeks after the midterms but have provided no indication of systemic problems. That’s just what election experts had expected and led critics to suggest that the new units were more […]
8 hours ago
Taiwan President Tsai Ing-wen casts her ballots at a polling station in New Taipei City, Taiwan, Sa...
Associated Press

Taiwan president resigns as party leader after election loss

TAIPEI, Taiwan (AP) — Taiwan President Tsai Ing-wen resigned as head of the ruling Democratic Progressive Party following local election losses on Saturday suffered by her party. Voters in Taiwan overwhelmingly chose the opposition Nationalist party in several major races across the self-ruled island in an election in which lingering concerns about threats from China […]
8 hours ago
In this picture released by the official website of the office of the Iranian supreme leader, Supre...
Associated Press

Iran leader praises force tasked with quashing protests

BAGHDAD (AP) — Iran’s supreme leader praised paramilitary volunteers tasked with quashing dissent on Saturday in a televised address as dozens of eye doctors warned that a rising number of demonstrators have been blinded by security forces during anti-government protests. Ayatollah Ali Khamenei addressed members of the Basij, the volunteer paramilitary wing of the elite […]
8 hours ago
FILE - The Twitter logo is seen on a mobile phone, Oct. 14, 2022, in Boston. Social media platforms...
Associated Press

Musk plans to relaunch Twitter premium service, again

Elon Musk said Friday that Twitter plans to relaunch its premium service that will offer different colored check marks to accounts next week.
8 hours ago

Sponsored Articles

...
Quantum Fiber

Stream 4K and more with powerful, high-speed fiber internet

Picking which streaming services to subscribe to are difficult choices, and there is no room for internet that cannot handle increased demands.
...
Children’s Cancer Network

Children’s Cancer Network celebrates cancer-fighting superheroes, raises funds during September’s Childhood Cancer Awareness Month

Jace Hyduchak was like most other kids in his kindergarten class: He loved to play basketball, dress up like his favorite superheroes and jump as high as his pint-sized body would take him on his backyard trampoline.
...
SCHWARTZ LASER EYE CENTER

Key dates for Arizona sports fans to look forward to this fall

Fall brings new beginnings in different ways for Arizona’s professional sports teams like the Cardinals and Coyotes.
Climate negotiations: 30 years of melting hope and US power