Biden global strategy tackles China, Russia, domestic needs

Oct 12, 2022, 10:47 AM | Updated: 7:34 pm
FILE - President Joe Biden speaks at the Volvo Group Powertrain Operations in Hagerstown, Md., Frid...

FILE - President Joe Biden speaks at the Volvo Group Powertrain Operations in Hagerstown, Md., Friday, Oct. 7, 2022. The White House laid out a national security strategy Wednesday aimed at checking an ascendant China and a more assertive Russia even as it stressed that domestic investments are key to helping the U.S. compete in the critical decade ahead. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

(AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

WASHINGTON (AP) — The White House laid out a national security strategy Wednesday aimed at checking an ascendant China and a more assertive Russia even as it stressed that domestic investments are key to helping the U.S. compete in the critical decade ahead.

The administration’s first national security strategy, a document required by statute, stresses the need for a foreign policy that balances the interests of global allies with those of middle-class Americans.

“We understand that if the United States is to succeed abroad, we must invest in our innovation and industrial strength, and build our resilience, at home,” the strategy states. “Likewise, to advance shared prosperity domestically and to uphold the rights of all Americans, we must proactively shape the international order in line with our interests and values.”

In broad brushstrokes, the strategy sketches a “decisive decade” for national security, as President Joe Biden faces an arguably more complicated world than when he took office 21 months ago in the midst of the worst global pandemic in a century. At the same time, the White House said policy-makers must “avoid the temptation to view the world solely through a competitive lens, and engage countries on their own terms.”

Biden came to office championing a “foreign policy for the middle class” that sought to put greater focus on China as a rising economic and military competitor, reinvigorate alliances that had frayed during the Trump administration and protect human rights, all while looking out for U.S. interests.

Administration officials say that the focus on U.S. interests remains central to Biden’s foreign policy vision. But the new strategy document also reflects the long list of crises that has left the world facing shared challenges including climate change, food insecurity, communicable diseases, and inflation.

“We’re in the early years of a decisive decade,” White House national security adviser Jake Sullivan said in a speech at Georgetown University to spotlight release of the document. “The terms of our competition with the People’s Republic of China will be set. The window of opportunity to deal with shared challenges like climate change will narrow drastically, even as the intensity of those challenges grows. So we need to grasp our moment.”

The document stresses the necessity of competing effectively with China, which the administration says is the only competitor that has both the intent and, increasingly, the capability to reshape the international order, while constraining a dangerous Russia.

Biden is dealing with a nearly eight-month Russian war in Ukraine that is wracking the global economy, increasingly assertive action by China toward the self-ruled island of Taiwan, mounting nuclear concerns in Iran and North Korea, and strained relations with the oil-rich kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

“Around the world, the need for American leadership is as great as it has ever been. We are in the midst of a strategic competition to shape the future of the international order,” Biden said in the introduction to the document. “Meanwhile, shared challenges that impact people everywhere demand increased global cooperation and nations stepping up to their responsibilities at a moment when this has become more difficult.”

Sullivan in remarks to reporters before the speech said the Ukraine crisis delayed rollout of the document but it had not “fundamentally altered” Biden’s approach to the strategy. The administration had initially planned to release the strategy in February.

“I do believe that it presents in living color the key elements of our approach: the emphasis on allies, the importance of strengthening the hand of the democratic world and standing up for our fellow democracies and for democratic values,” Sullivan said.

On the issue of oil, Biden said Wednesday the administration would “react to Saudi Arabia” in response to the Riyadh-led OPEC+ alliance announcement last week that it would cut oil production. The president’s comments came after he said a day earlier that the Saudis would face “consequences” for the move.

Democratic lawmakers are pushing legislation that would halt U.S. military sales to the Saudis in light of the oil production cut, which White House officials say will help another OPEC+ member, Russia, pad its coffers as it prosecutes its war in Ukraine.

In a statement Wednesday night, the Saudi Ministry of Foreign Affairs insisted the OPEC+ decision was “purely economic” and “any attempts to distort the facts about the Kingdom’s position regarding the crisis in Ukraine are unfortunate.”

“The Kingdom affirms that it views its relationship with the United States of America as a strategic one that serves the common interests of both countries,” the ministry added.

Biden has already begun reviewing potential actions and will consider the call for a halt on arms sales to Riyadh. Sullivan said a decision on arms sales was not imminent.

Copyright © The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

AP

Associated Press

Guest lineups for the Sunday news shows

WASHINGTON (AP) — ABC’s “This Week” — Reps. Hakeem Jeffries, D-N.Y., and Dave Joyce, R-Ohio; Sam Bankman-Fried, founder and former CEO of cryptocurrency exchange FTX. __ NBC’s “Meet the Press” — Israeli Prime Minister-designate Benjamin Netanyahu; Rep. Katherine Clark, D-Mass. __ CBS’ “Face the Nation” — Secretary of State Antony Blinken; Reps. Pete Aguilar, D-Calif., […]
17 hours ago
Rev. Paula Stecker of the Christ the King Lutheran Church tidies up a memorial outside Club Q follo...
Associated Press

EXPLAINER: What do we know about the Colorado bomb threat?

DENVER (AP) — More than a year before police say Anderson Lee Aldrich killed five people and wounded 17 others at a gay night club in Colorado Springs, Aldrich was arrested on allegations of making a bomb threat that led to the evacuation of about 10 homes. Aldrich, who uses the pronoun they and is […]
17 hours ago
Pennsylvania state House of Representatives' impeachment managers Reps. Craig Williams, left, Tim B...
Associated Press

Philly prosecutor sues to stop lawmakers from removing him

HARRISBURG, Pa. (AP) — Philadelphia’s elected prosecutor asked a state court Friday to halt a Republican-led effort to remove him from office, arguing that the process ended when the Legislature’s two-year session ran out earlier in the week. District Attorney Larry Krasner, a Democrat, wants Commonwealth Court to declare that the General Assembly lacks constitutional […]
17 hours ago
Associated Press

Guilty plea in boy’s death that sparked federal task force

KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) — A man pleaded guilty Friday in the killing of a 4-year-old Kansas City boy whose death led to a federal operation meant to reduce violent crime in 2020. Ryson Ellis, 24, of Kansas City, was sentenced to 22 years in prison after pleading guilty to second-degree murder, unlawful use of […]
17 hours ago
FILE - A General Motors logo is displayed outside the General Motors Detroit-Hamtramck Assembly pla...
Associated Press

GM venture to invest additional $275M at Tennessee plant

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — A joint venture between General Motors and South Korean battery company LG Energy Solution announced Friday that it will invest an additional $275 million to expand a Tennessee battery cell factory for electric vehicles. Officials with the companies had already pledged to spend $2.3 billion to build a battery plant in […]
17 hours ago
FILE - Indiana Attorney General Todd Rokita speaks during a watch party for Jennifer-Ruth Green, th...
Associated Press

Indiana judge won’t block probe over 10-year-old’s abortion

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — An Indiana judge on Friday rejected an attempt to block the state’s Republican attorney general from continuing his office’s investigation of an Indianapolis doctor who has spoken publicly about providing an abortion to a 10-year-old rape victim who traveled from Ohio after its more-restrictive abortion law took effect. The ruling comes two […]
17 hours ago

Sponsored Articles

...
Quantum Fiber

How high-speed fiber internet edges out cable for everyday use

In a world where technology drives so much of our daily lives, a lack of high-speed internet can be a major issue.
...
Quantum Fiber

Stream 4K and more with powerful, high-speed fiber internet

Picking which streaming services to subscribe to are difficult choices, and there is no room for internet that cannot handle increased demands.
...
Quantum Fiber

How high-speed fiber internet can improve everyday life

Quantum Fiber supplies unlimited data with speeds up to 940 mbps, enough to share 4K videos with coworkers 20 times faster than a cable.
Biden global strategy tackles China, Russia, domestic needs