Ukraine orchestra’s leader debuts at Met with Russian opera

Oct 5, 2022, 8:00 AM | Updated: Oct 22, 2022, 12:46 pm
This image released by the Metropolitan Opera shows Keri-Lynn Wilson conducting a rehearsal for Sho...

This image released by the Metropolitan Opera shows Keri-Lynn Wilson conducting a rehearsal for Shostakovich's "Lady Macbeth of Mtsensk" at the Metropolitan Opera in New York on Sept. 8, 2022. (Jonathan Tichler/Metropolitan Opera via AP)

(Jonathan Tichler/Metropolitan Opera via AP)

NEW YORK (AP) — It’s been quite a year for conductor Keri-Lynn Wilson, forming an orchestra from scratch, leading it on a 12-city tour, and then as soon as it disbanded going straight to the Metropolitan Opera to prepare for an opening-week debut.

Hers were the guiding hands that molded the Ukrainian Freedom Orchestra, an ensemble founded as a musical statement of defiance against Vladimir Putin’s invasion of Ukraine.

Wilson, who traces her own Ukrainian ancestry to great-grandparents on her mother’s side, recalled being in Europe when the assault began in February.

Three weeks later, “I was supposed to go to Odessa to conduct, and instead I met Peter in London,” she said. “And I was just constantly crying and saying we have to do something, and that’s when the tour was born.”

Peter is Peter Gelb, Wilson’s husband and the Met’s general manager. He contacted the head of the Polish National Opera, and together they arranged funding and tour dates for the new orchestra.

Quickly, Wilson assembled a group of 75 Ukrainian musicians, some of them recent refugees, some members of European orchestras, and others still living in their embattled country.

“It was a select group, but really quite raw,” she said. “And a lot of them hadn’t been playing for months. They were maybe relocating, desperately trying to find homes, jobs in other countries. And coming out of COVID.”

With only 10 days to rehearse together in Warsaw before launching the tour, Wilson recalled, “The first day was quite rough, and we just played Dvorák’s ‘New World Symphony.’ The second day, after seven hours I was astonished. And by the fourth day, the Dvorák just rocked.”

The tour hit 10 European cities plus New York and Washington, gathering glowing reviews with programs that included, in addition to the Dvorák, a symphony by Ukrainian composer Valentin Silvestrov, works by Brahms and Chopin, and two operatic arias sung by Ukrainian soprano Liudmyla Monastyrska.

Because of the orchestra’s unique political mission, no Russian music was included in those concerts. But Wilson strongly opposes any suggestion that Russian composers are somehow tainted by Putin’s aggression.

“There has never been any doubt in my mind that we can’t hold literature or Russian culture hostage,” she said.

Where she draws the line, however, is working with artists who support the current regime. Thus, when she was engaged to conduct a run of Puccini’s “Tosca” later this fall in Buenos Aires, she noted that Russian soprano Anna Netrebko — who has been barred from the Met and other houses for refusing to distance herself from Putin — was listed to sing two of the performances.

“I said, ‘I’m sorry, I can’t perform with Ms. Netrebko,’ and they said, ‘Don’t worry, she’s bringing her own conductor.’ So it was fine.”

The opera that has brought her to the Met for the first time is a 20th century Russian masterpiece, Dmitri Shostakovich’s “Lady Macbeth of Mtsensk.” In it, the 26-year-old composer set a sordid tale of rape, murder and betrayal to a raucous, dissonant score that puts extreme demands on players and singers alike.

“For me, it’s a perfect piece to make my debut,” said Wilson, who had previously conducted the opera in Tel Aviv and Zurich. “I’ve had a love affair with Russia since I was a child… and this opera is just a tour de force for a conductor. It’s a piece where I can really show my stuff.”

Wilson praised the Met orchestra as “a phenomenal vehicle to work with,” and the chorus as “fabulous,” but said that in the first rehearsals she had to remind them that “in this piece you can’t have any inhibitions.

“It was interesting to see how safe some of the playing was,” she said. “Some players go for it and some… I really had to say, ‘No that fortissimo isn’t enough.’ Things were too beautiful. Some of the chorus was too beautiful.”

Although the Met scheduled this revival and hired her three years before the invasion, Wilson said the timing couldn’t have been better.

“This is the opera that was banned by Stalin,” she said. “Just as Putin is trying to silence Russians who are retaliating or who are doing anything out of the box artistically, this is shouting out right in his face. It’s extraordinary, the symbolism.”

Wilson, who grew up in Winnipeg, Canada, went to The Juilliard School in New York to study flute, but said she soon became “totally, annoyingly bored” with the instrument. “I enjoyed playing in the orchestra,” she said, “but it came to the point where I had to conduct to make music the way I wanted to.”

Her career flourished and she worked at many of the world’s leading opera houses and concert halls, but never at the Met. Finally, in 2019, the Met’s music director, fellow Canadian Yannick Nezet-Seguin, invited her to make her debut this season.

“I thought that after conducting in London, Paris, in Russia and elsewhere in the U.S., that she should come to our house, which is the best opera house in the world,” Nezet-Seguin said.

Judging from the critical response, Wilson’s first appearance is unlikely to be her last.

“There were some grumbles when the season was announced about a plum gig going to the boss’ wife,” wrote Zachary Woolfe in The New York Times, reviewing the first performance on Sept. 29. “But the quality of her work spoke for itself… This was a very fine performance.”

“Lady Macbeth of Mtsensk” continues at the Met through Oct. 21 with a cast that includes Russian soprano Svetlana Sozdateleva as the title character, tenor Brandon Jovanovich as her lover, and bass-baritone John Relyea as her brutish father-in-law.

For Wilson, jumping right into rehearsals at the Met after the Ukrainian Freedom Orchestra’s final concert eased the pain of separation.

“Oh, it was awful,” she recalled of watching the musicians disperse, many for an uncertain future. “Thank God I had this job to come to.”

The one solace was being able to assure the players that the orchestra will reunite next summer for another series of concerts.

“Hopefully it will be a victory tour,” she said. “That would be awesome.”

This story was first published on Oct. 5, 2022. It was updated Saturday, Oct. 22, 2022, to remove a portion of Keri-Lynn Wilson’s quote about rehearsals involving Russian soprano Anna Netrebko.

Copyright © The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


              This image released by the Metropolitan Opera shows Keri-Lynn Wilson conducting a rehearsal for Shostakovich's "Lady Macbeth of Mtsensk" at the Metropolitan Opera in New York on Sept. 8, 2022. (Jonathan Tichler/Metropolitan Opera via AP)
            
              This image released by the Metropolitan Opera shows Keri-Lynn Wilson conducting a rehearsal for Shostakovich's "Lady Macbeth of Mtsensk" at the Metropolitan Opera in New York on Sept. 8, 2022. (Jonathan Tichler/Metropolitan Opera via AP)

AP

FILE - Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., speaks to reporters at the Capitol in Washingt...
Associated Press

Landmark same-sex marriage bill wins Senate passage

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate passed bipartisan legislation Tuesday to protect same-sex marriages, an extraordinary sign of shifting national politics on the issue and a measure of relief for the hundreds of thousands of same-sex couples who have married since the Supreme Court’s 2015 decision that legalized gay marriage nationwide. The bill, which would ensure […]
17 hours ago
Associated Press

Safety board recommends new measures for Alaska air tours

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal accident investigators say the government should issue regulations to improve the safety of air tours in part of Alaska where seven sightseeing planes have crashed since 2007, killing 31 people. The National Transportation Safety Board said Tuesday that the Federal Aviation Administration should tighten rules about minimum visibility during flights and […]
17 hours ago
Associated Press

Recount efforts hold up Pennsylvania election certifications

HARRISBURG, Pa. (AP) — Pennsylvania elections officials said Tuesday “a handful” of counties have not fully reported results from this month’s election, at least in part because organized efforts to seek recounts are pending in court. The Department of State declined to say how many of the state’s 67 counties failed to meet the deadline […]
17 hours ago
Associated Press

Chicago police arrest 2 men in fatal shooting of girl, 12

CHICAGO (AP) — Two men have been arrested and charged with murder in the fatal March shooting of a girl who was struck in the head by a stray bullet after celebrating her 12th birthday, Chicago police said Tuesday. Malik Parish, 22, and Abdul Ali, 20, were arrested on Sunday, Chicago Police Superintendent David Brown […]
17 hours ago
President Joe Biden speaks at the top of a meeting with congressional leaders to discuss legislativ...
Associated Press

EXPLAINER: What to know on Congress’ bid to bar rail strike

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden is asking Congress to intervene to avert a potentially crippling freight rail strike before Christmas and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi is calling a vote this week to do so, even if it means handing a defeat to Democratic allies in the labor movement. The legislation urged by Biden and […]
17 hours ago
Associated Press

Vet’s lawsuit blaming antimalarial drug for psychosis tossed

LOS ANGELES (AP) — A federal judge threw out a lawsuit against the maker of an anti-malarial drug blamed for causing psychotic behavior and neurological damage to U.S. servicemembers, ruling that the case had no right to be filed in California. The proposed class-action case brought last year by an Army veteran accused Roche Laboratories […]
17 hours ago

Sponsored Articles

(Photo via MLB's Arizona Fall League / Twitter)...
Arizona Fall League

Top prospects to watch at this year’s Arizona Fall League

One of the most exciting elements of the MLB offseason is the Arizona Fall League, which began its 30th season Monday.
...
Day & Night Air Conditioning, Heating and Plumbing

Here are 4 signs the HVAC unit needs to be replaced

Pool renovations and kitchen upgrades may seem enticing, but at the forefront of these investments arguably should be what residents use the most. In a state where summertime is sweltering, access to a functioning HVAC unit can be critical.
...
Day & Night Air Conditioning, Heating and Plumbing

Ways to prevent clogged drains and what to do if you’re too late

While there are a variety of ways to prevent clogged drains, it's equally as important to know what to do when you're already too late.
Ukraine orchestra’s leader debuts at Met with Russian opera