Georgia election officials discuss breach, security measures

Sep 28, 2022, 2:56 PM | Updated: 4:20 pm
FILE - This Jan. 7, 2021, image taken from Coffee County, Ga., security video, appears to show Cath...

FILE - This Jan. 7, 2021, image taken from Coffee County, Ga., security video, appears to show Cathy Latham (center, long turquoise top), introducing members of a computer forensic team to local election officials. Latham was the county Republican Party chair at the time. The computer forensics team was at the county elections office in Douglas, Ga., to make copies of voting equipment in an effort that documents show was arranged by attorney Sidney Powell and others allied with then-President Donald Trump. (Coffee County, Georgia via AP)

(Coffee County, Georgia via AP)

ATLANTA (AP) — The Georgia State Election Board held a meeting Wednesday meant to reassure board members and the general public that the state’s elections remain secure following the revelation of a breach of voting equipment in one county.

The meeting included a presentation on state election law, an explanation of how the state’s voting machines work and a description of post-election audits. It also included a report on the breach of voting equipment in rural Coffee County.

“I think what happened in Coffee County was despicable,” board Chairman William Duffey, a retired federal judge, said after the meeting. If the investigation finds evidence of crimes, the penalties should be significant “to let people there and in other counties know that we are not going to put up with that,” he said.

While acknowledging the serious concerns raised by that breach, the board members said they remain confident in the state’s election system.

Sara Tindall Ghazal, the state Democratic Party’s appointee to the board, said elections have to balance three “sometimes-competing interests” — security, accessibility and efficient administration.

“Georgia’s system reflects an attempt to balance these issues and interests,” she said. “I have trust in our election officials and in our voters to ensure that our elections will proceed smoothly and securely and that the outcome will reflect the will of the voters.”

A computer forensics team hired by allies of then-President Donald Trump traveled to the elections office in Coffee County, about 200 miles southeast of Atlanta, on Jan. 7, 2021, and made complete copies of data and software on elections equipment, according to documents and deposition testimony produced in response to subpoenas in a long-running lawsuit challenging the security of the state’s voting machines. Security camera video from the elections office shows that local Republican Party and county election officials were present when the copying took place.

The video also shows that two men who have participated in efforts to question the results of the 2020 election in several states repeatedly visited the Coffee County elections office later that month, spending hours inside.

The Georgia Bureau of Investigation and the secretary of state’s office are looking into the breach. Since similar activity has happened in other states, the FBI has also been contacted, Duffey said. An Atlanta-based prosecutor looking into attempts by Trump to overturn his loss in the state is also seeking to question people involved.

A group of computer and election security experts earlier this month sent a letter to the State Election Board saying the breach poses “serious threats” to the state’s voting system. The experts include academics and former state election officials who aren’t associated with efforts to overturn the results of the 2020 presidential election. They urged the board to replace the state’s Dominion Voting Systems touchscreen voting machines with hand-marked paper ballots.

During a presentation on state election law, Republican election board member Matt Mashburn said the board can only mandate such an emergency measure in cases of “imminent peril to public health, safety, or welfare.”

The ballots printed by Georgia’s voting machines include a QR code — a barcode that is read and tabulated by a scanner — and a human-readable list representing the voter’s selections.

Dominion CEO John Poulos appeared by videoconference and described how the voting system works. He highlighted various security measures, including encryption, passwords, scanned backups of paper ballots, physical seals and testing publicly before elections. He said it’s very important for voters to verify that the list on the ballot reflects their selections.

Blake Evans, elections director for the secretary of state’s office, walked board members through the process for the audits that Georgia now uses to check one statewide race during even-year general elections. The “risk-limiting audits” rely on statistics, mathematics and a hand count of a sample of ballots to ensure that the machine-tabulated result is accurate.

Critics of the voting machines have said studies show voters rarely check their ballots. They say that means there’s no guarantee the ballots accurately reflect voter intent, making any audit meaningless.

University of Michigan computer science professor J. Alex Halderman, an expert witness in the voting machines lawsuit that exposed the breach in Coffee County, identified what he says are security vulnerabilities in Georgia’s voting machines. The Department of Homeland Security’s Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency in June issued an advisory based on Halderman’s findings that includes measures to mitigate the risks.

Dominion commissioned its own review of Halderman’s findings by the MITRE Corporation. An executive summary of that report deems the potential attacks identified “operationally infeasible.”

The Halderman and MITRE reports were filed under seal in federal court. The election board unanimously endorsed a motion to urge the judge overseeing the case to release the reports with necessary redactions. Board member Ed Lindsey, a former Republican state lawmaker, said that would allow the public to “evaluate and have confidence in our election system.”

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AP

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Georgia election officials discuss breach, security measures