What we know about how Pence’s day unfolded on Jan. 6

Jun 15, 2022, 9:09 PM | Updated: 9:36 pm
In this image from video, a security video shows Vice President Mike Pence being evacuated from nea...

In this image from video, a security video shows Vice President Mike Pence being evacuated from near the Senate chamber as rioters breach the Capitol, on Jan. 6, 2021, at the Capitol in Washington. Pence won't be testifying at Thursday's Jan. 6 committee hearing. But he will be in the spotlight as the group turns its focus to former President Donald Trump's desperate attempts to persuade Pence to overturn the results of the 2020 presidential election. (Senate Television via AP)

(Senate Television via AP)

WASHINGTON (AP) — Mike Pence won’t be testifying at Thursday’s Jan. 6 committee hearing. But he will be in the spotlight as focus turns to former President Donald Trump’s desperate and futile attempts to persuade his vice president to overturn the results of the 2020 presidential election and deliver them a second term.

“As you will hear, President Trump engaged in a relentless effort to pressure Pence both in private and in public,” Rep. Liz Cheney, the leading Republican on the committee, said last week. “Vice President Pence demonstrated his loyalty to Donald Trump consistently over four years, but he knew that he had a higher duty to the United States Constitution.”

What we know about Pence’s actions leading up to and during that day:

UNDER PRESSURE

As Trump’s frantic efforts to stave off defeat were quashed by courts and state officials, he and his allies zeroed in on Jan. 6 — the day a joint session of Congress would convene to formalize President-elect Joe Biden’s victory — as their last chance to remain in power.

The heavy-handed pressure campaign intensified in the days leading up to the 6th as Trump, lawyer John Eastman and others in Trump’s orbit tried to convince Pence that he had the power to overturn the will of voters in a handful of critical battleground states by simply rejecting Electoral College votes or sending the results back to the states — even though the Constitution makes clear the vice president’s role in the proceedings is largely ceremonial.

Pence spent hours huddling with staff, including his general counsel, Greg Jacob. He studied the Electoral Count Act of 1887, which governs the proceedings, and met with the Senate parliamentarian to understand his role. He also received outside counsel, including from former Vice President Dan Quayle.

Some aides appealed to Trump not to put his unflinchingly loyal vice president in such a precarious position. Pence was already widely seen as a potential future presidential candidate and a public fissure with Trump was seen as a potential career ender. But Trump kept pushing, both publicly and behind the scenes.

On Monday, Jan. 4, Eastman and Trump pressed Pence to go along with the scheme in an Oval Office meeting. And at a rally that night in Georgia, Trump said his fate rested in his vice president’s hands. “I hope Mike Pence comes through for us,” he told the crowd.

Trump continued to push in an Oval Office meeting the next day, where he again urged Pence to use powers the vice president did not possess to overturn the will of voters. Pence by then made clear that he was unconvinced.

That day, Jacob sent a memo putting in writing his conclusion that if Pence followed Eastman’s proposal, he would likely lose in court, at best, or spark a constitutional crisis, Politico first reported. The tensions were so high that Pence’s chief of staff, Marc Short, placed a call to Pence’s lead Secret Service agent that day, The New York Times first reported, informing him that the vice president’s refusal to go along with Trump was about to become public.

‘HANG MIKE PENCE’

The pressure continued through the night. “If Vice President @Mike_Pence comes through for us, we will win the Presidency,” Trump tweeted around 1 a.m.

“All Mike Pence has to do is send them back to the States, AND WE WIN,” he wrote later that morning. “Do it Mike, this is a time for extreme courage!”

Pence was at his residence at the Naval Observatory the morning of Jan. 6 when he spoke a final time with Trump, who was joined in the Oval Office by his daughter Ivanka and Pence’s national security adviser, Keith Kellogg. During the call in the 11 o’clock hour, Trump berated Pence, chastising him for not being tough enough to go along with the scheme, according to Kellogg’s testimony to the committee.

Pence then headed to the Capitol to oversee the counting of the Electoral College votes that would formalize Trump’s defeat.

But first Pence made official what his aides had already made clear. In a letter addressed to his colleagues in Congress, Pence explained why he couldn’t go along with Trump’s plan.

“It is my considered judgment that my oath to support and defend the Constitution constrains me from claiming unilateral authority to determine which electoral votes should be counted and which should not,” he wrote.

At 1:03 p.m., he officially gaveled the U.S. Senate into session as pro-Trump rioters, who had already breached Capitol barricades, were outside clashing with police.

By that point, Trump was already close to wrapping up his speech on the Ellipse in which he repeatedly targeted Pence and urged his supporters to “fight like hell.”

“If Mike Pence does the right thing, we win the election,” Trump falsely told the crowd. “All Vice President Pence has to do is send it back to the states to recertify and we become president and you are the happiest people.”

Outside the Capitol, the scene devolved into violent chaos as rioters, some armed with pipes, bats and bear spray, charged into the Capitol, quickly overwhelming police. One officer was beaten and repeatedly shocked with a stun gun until he had a heart attack. Another was foaming at the mouth and screaming for help as rioters crushed him between two doors and bashed him in the head with his own weapon. At 1:49 p.m., D.C. police officially declared a riot.

At about 2:12 p.m., Pence was rushed off the Senate floor as rioters flooded inside. The Washington Post first reported that Pence, who had been joined that day by his wife and their daughter, was at one point less than 100 feet from a group of protesters.

IN HIDING

Pence spent the next hours in hiding with his staff and family — first in his ceremonial office and then in an underground loading dock inside the Capitol complex. At least twice, he rejected pleas from security staff to leave the building, insisting it was crucial that he remain in place.

But even as the horror played out live on television, Trump, instead of urging his supporters to go home, blasted Pence.

“Mike Pence didn’t have the courage to do what should have been done to protect our Country and our Constitution, giving States a chance to certify a corrected set of facts, not the fraudulent or inaccurate ones which they were asked to previously certify,” Trump tweeted at 2:24 p.m. “USA demands the truth!

Trump’s tweet echoed through the angry mob. Footage obtained by the committee shows rioters reading Trump’s words aloud and crowds breaking into chants of “Hang Mike Pence!” A makeshift gallows was photographed outside.

The committee alleges Trump was made aware of the chants and “responded with this sentiment: ‘Maybe our supporters have the right idea.’ Mike Pence ‘deserves’ it,'” Cheney charged.

“LET’S GET BACK TO WORK”

At 8 p.m., after hours of fear and carnage, the Capitol was finally deemed secure and Pence reconvened the Senate with a message.

“Today was a dark day in the history of the United States Capitol. But thanks to the swift efforts of U.S. Capitol Police, federal, state and local law enforcement, the violence was quelled. The Capitol is secured. And the people’s work continues,” he told the nation. “Let’s get back to work,” he said to applause.

Just after 3:40 a.m. Pence officially declared Trump’s election defeat — as well as his own.

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What we know about how Pence’s day unfolded on Jan. 6