Seoul: N Korea fires suspected ICBM and 2 other missiles

May 24, 2022, 2:32 PM | Updated: May 25, 2022, 8:07 pm
In this photo provided by South Korea Presidential Office via Yonhap News Agency, South Korean Pres...

In this photo provided by South Korea Presidential Office via Yonhap News Agency, South Korean President Yoon Suk Yeol speaks during the National Security Council (NSC) meeting at the presidential office in Seoul, South Korea, Wednesday, May 25, 2022. North Korea test-launched a suspected intercontinental ballistic missile and two shorter-range weapons into the sea Wednesday, South Korea said, hours after President Joe Biden ended a trip to Asia where he reaffirmed the U.S. commitment to defend its allies in the face of the North's nuclear threat. (South Korea Presidential Office /Yonhap via AP)

(South Korea Presidential Office /Yonhap via AP)

SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — North Korea test-launched a suspected intercontinental ballistic missile and two shorter-range weapons toward its eastern waters Wednesday, South Korea said, hours after President Joe Biden ended a trip to Asia where he reaffirmed the U.S. commitment to defend its allies in the face of the North’s nuclear threat.

The suspected ICBM didn’t fly its full range. But if confirmed, it would still be North Korea’s first test of an ICBM system in about two months amid stalled nuclear diplomacy with the United States. The launch suggests North Korea is determined to continue its efforts to modernize its arsenal despite its first COVID-19 outbreak, which has caused outside worries about a humanitarian disaster.

“North Korea’s sustained provocations can only result in stronger and faster South Korea-U.S. combined deterrence and can only deepen North Korea’s international isolation,” the South Korean government said in a statement after an emergency security meeting.

Japanese Defense Minister Nobuo Kishi called the launches “an act of provocation and absolutely impermissible.”

U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken held separate calls with his counterparts from South Korea and Japan during which they condemned the launches as a clear violation of multiple U.N. Security Council resolutions, the State Department said.

Blinken noted Washington’s commitment to the defense of South Korea and Japan “remains ironclad” as the three allies continue to cooperate to achieve the complete denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula, the statement said.

U.N. spokesman Stephane Dujarric said the launch of the three missiles “only contributes to increasing regional and international tensions” and reiterated U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres’ call on North Korea to comply with U.N. Security Council resolutions, which ban such tests.

“Diplomatic engagement remains the only pathway to sustainable peace and complete and verifiable de-nuclearization of the Korean Peninsula,” Dujarric said.

“(The launches) were a political message. They’re saying they feel bad” about Biden’s recent summit with South Korean President Yoon Suk Yeol, said Chang Young-keun, a missile expert at Korea Aerospace University in South Korea.

Biden and Yoon said after their meeting Saturday that they would consider expanded military exercises to deter North Korean nuclear threats.

Biden brushed aside questions about any possible provocation by North Korea during his trip, saying, “We are prepared for anything North Korea does.” He later met with Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida in Tokyo, and they vowed to work closely to address security challenges, including North Korea’s nuclear and ballistic programs and what they called China’s “increasingly coercive” behavior in the region.

According to South Korea’s military, the first missile was likely an ICBM that reached a maximum height of 540 kilometers (335 miles) while traveling 360 kilometers (223 miles). The statement said the second missile disappeared from South Korean radar at some point and the third flew 760 kilometers (472 miles).

Kim Tae-hyo, South Korea’s deputy national security adviser, told reporters that the first launch involved the North’s biggest Hwasong-17 missile, whose potential range includes the entirety of the U.S. mainland. He said the missile was fired at a high angle and that its launch appeared aimed at reviewing the weapon’s propellant and stage separations, though he couldn’t conclusively say whether the test was successful.

He said the tests of the two other missiles, both short-range, implied North Korea’s intention to improve its ability to launch nuclear strikes on its rivals.

While the North Korean launches were part of its weapons development program, they were also strategically timed to the end of Biden’s Asian visits and likely designed to test the readiness of South Korea’s new government, which took office about two weeks ago, Kim said.

The flight details for the suspected ICBM were similar to those of two previous North Korean launches this year, which the South Korean and U.S. militaries had said were meant to test components of the Hwasong-17 missile. North Korea said at the time it launched rockets to test cameras for a spy satellite.

After the two launches, South Korea’s military in March detected what it said was a North Korean Hwasong-17 missile that blew up soon after liftoff. Later in the month, North Korea claimed to have successfully launched the Hwasong-17 in its first full-range ICBM flight test that broke its self-imposed 2018 moratorium on long-distance launches.

South Korea said North Korea may have fired a smaller ICBM, not a Hwasong-17. Whichever it was, the missile flew longer and higher than any other weapon the North has ever tested, experts say.

Chang, the missile expert, said he doubts whether North Korea truly launched an ICBM again Wednesday because the country would have no reason to conduct the same test repeatedly and waste an ICBM that costs about 10 billion to 20 billion won ($8 million to $16 million).

He said the flight details of the third missile resemble those of the hypersonic missile that North Korea tested in January. Other analysts say it could also be the North’s highly maneuverable, nuclear-capable KN-23 missile.

After the North’s earlier launches, the South Korean and U.S. militaries said they fired surface-to-surface missiles to demonstrate their striking capabilities. South Korea said its air force on Tuesday conducted an “elephant walk” involving 30, fully armed F-15K fighter jets parading along a runway in formation.

Wednesday’s launches were North Korea’s 17th round of missile firings this year. Experts have said North Korea wants to move ahead with its push to expand its arsenal and apply more pressure on its rivals to wrest sanctions relief and other concessions.

U.S., South Korean and Japanese officials have said North Korea could soon conduct its first nuclear test in nearly five years as well. Kim, the South Korean official, said North Korea has been testing a trigger system for a nuclear explosive device.

Before Wednesday, North Korea’s most recent missile tests occurred on May 12, hours after the country acknowledged a COVID-19 outbreak.

The country in the past few days has said there has been “a positive sign” in its anti-virus campaign. Since admitting to the outbreak, North Korea has identified about 3 million cases of an unidentified fever but said only 68 people died, an extremely low death toll for COVID-19.

___

Associated Press writer Mari Yamaguchi in Tokyo and Edith M. Lederer at the United Nations contributed to this report.

Copyright © The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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Seoul: N Korea fires suspected ICBM and 2 other missiles