In shift, GOP ramps up vaccine push as resistance hardens

Jul 22, 2021, 9:29 PM | Updated: Jul 24, 2021, 11:15 am

WASHINGTON (AP) — Republican politicians are under increasing pressure to speak out to persuade COVID-19 vaccine skeptics to roll up their sleeves and take the shots as a new, more contagious variant sends caseloads soaring. But after months of ignoring — and, in some cases, stoking — misinformation about the virus, new polling suggests it may be too late to change the minds of many who are refusing.

In recent news conferences and statements, some prominent Republicans have been imploring their constituents to lay lingering doubts aside. In Washington, the so-called Doctors Caucus gathered at the Capitol for an event to combat vaccine hesitancy. And in Alabama, Republican Gov. Kay Ivey voiced exasperation as she pleaded with residents to protect themselves.

“Folks are supposed to have common sense,” she told reporters. “It’s the unvaccinated folks that are letting us down. … I’ve done all I know how to do. I can encourage you to do something, but I can’t make you take care of yourself.”

The pleas come as COVID-19 cases have nearly tripled in the U.S. over the last two weeks, driven by the explosion of the new delta variant, especially in pockets of the country where vaccination rates are low. Public health officials believe the variant is at least twice as contagious as the original version, but the shots appear to offer robust protection against serious illness for most people.

Nearly all COVID-19 deaths in the U.S. are now people who haven’t been vaccinated. Just 56.2% of Americans have received at least one vaccine dose, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

“I think they’ve finally realized that if their people aren’t vaccinated, they’re going to get sick, and if their people aren’t vaccinated, they’re going to get blamed for COVID outbreaks in the future,” said GOP pollster Frank Luntz, who has been working with the Biden administration and public health experts to craft effective messaging to bring the vaccine hesitant off the fence.

But Luntz, who conducted another focus group Wednesday evening with vaccine holdouts, said there has been a discernible shift in recent weeks as skepticism has calcified into hardened refusal.

“Once you are opposed, it is very hard to change that position. And that’s what’s happening right now,” he said.

Indeed, a new poll from The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research found that most Americans who haven’t been vaccinated say they are unlikely to do so, with 45% saying they definitely will not and 35% saying they probably won’t. Republicans, the poll found, remain far more likely than Democrats to pass on the shots.

Overall, 83% of Democrats but only 51% of Republicans said they had received at least one dose. And among unvaccinated Republicans, just 12% said they were planning to get the shot, while 32% said they probably wouldn’t, and 56% said they definitely won’t.

For months now, many conservative lawmakers and pundits have been stoking vaccine hesitancy, refusing to take the shots themselves or downplaying the severity of the virus. Republican governors have signed bills protecting the unvaccinated from having to disclose their status and tried to roll back mask mandates. And on social media, disinformation has run rampant, leading President Joe Biden to claim platforms like Facebook were “killing people” — a claim he later walked back.

At a recent conservative gathering, attendees cheered the news that the Biden administration was falling short of its vaccination goals. Invoking the nation’s top infectious-disease expert, Dr. Anthony Fauci, Rep. Lauren Boebert, R-Colo., warned the government: “Don’t come knocking on my door with your Fauci Ouchie! You leave us the hell alone.”

Others, including former President Donald Trump, have defended those who have chosen not to get vaccinated, stressing that the decision is a personal choice. Instead, they have pointed fingers at Democrats, suggesting they are to blame for the distrust.

“People are refusing to take the Vaccine because they don’t trust (Biden’s) Administration, they don’t trust the Election results, and they certainly don’t trust the Fake News,” Trump said in a recent statement.

But there were signs that messaging was changing this week, as conservative leaders advocated for the shots. On Fox News, host Sean Hannity implored his viewers to “please take COVID seriously,” saying, “Enough people have died.” Iowa Sen. Chuck Grassley on Twitter encouraged “ALL eligible Iowans/Americans to get vaccinated.”

“The Delta variant scares me,” he wrote.

Louisiana Rep. Steve Scalise, the House Republican whip, distributed pictures of himself receiving his first dose of the vaccine last weekend after months of holding out. And in Florida, Republican Gov. Ron DeSantis, who has been selling campaign merchandise mocking masks and medical experts, this week pointed to data showing the vast majority of hospitalized COVID-19 patients are unvaccinated.

“These vaccines are saving lives,” he said.

But the news conference convened by House GOP leaders on Thursday highlighted Republicans’ competing messages on the virus.

Initially billed as an event where Republican doctors in Congress would address the rapidly spreading delta variant, the group instead spent most of its time railing against China and making unverified claims that the coronavirus came from a lab leak in Wuhan, a theory initially popular in far-right circles but now being seriously considered by scientists. They also attacked Democrats, including House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and the Biden administration, for not doing more to get to the bottom of the lab leak theory.

“The question is, Why are Democrats stonewalling our efforts to uncover the origins of the COVID virus?” said New York Rep. Elise Stefanik, the No. 3 Republican in the House.

Eric Ward, a senior fellow at the Southern Poverty Law Center who studies extremism, blamed vaccine reluctance on “nearly a year-and-a-half of right-wing rage machine rhetoric.”

“Even conservative leaders now are having a hard time figuring out how to rein in what had primarily been a propaganda campaign, and they are now realizing their constituencies are particularly vulnerable,” he said.

While some Republicans may be using strong words to promote the vaccine, few are proposing new measures to urge vaccination, such as incentives, public information campaigns or more aggressive outreach.

In New Hampshire, where shots have slowed to about 1,000 per week, Republican Gov. Chris Sununu said there are no immediate plans to launch new initiatives.

“Right now, it’s folks’ individual responsibility. If someone hasn’t been vaccinated at this point, they’ve made that conscious decision not to,” he said Thursday. “The government’s job is to provide that open door. If you want the vaccine, here it is, nice and easy. If you need more information, here it is. So you have every tool in the toolbox available to you and your family to make that decision.”

In Alabama, Ivey said she would not force students to wear masks when school resumes and would leave that decision up to local school districts.

Other Republican continue to peddle falsehoods.

Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene, R-Ga., was suspended from posting on Twitter for 12 hours this week after spreading disinformation about vaccine-related deaths. And Charlie Kirk, the founder of Turning Point USA, a youth conservative advocacy group, suggested without evidence on his podcast that up to 1.2 million could have died after getting the COVID-19 vaccine.

In his focus groups, Luntz said that many skeptics have struggled to assess the veracity of the things they read and hear.

“There is so much misinformation out there, and they can’t tell the difference between what is accurate and what is fake,” he said. “So it makes it virtually impossible to communicate when they don’t know what to believe.”

___

Associated Press writers Emily Swanson, Holly Ramer and Kevin Freking contributed to this report.

Copyright © The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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In shift, GOP ramps up vaccine push as resistance hardens