ARIZONA NEWS

APS, SRP ask customers to conserve energy due to extreme demand

Aug 19, 2020, 1:33 PM | Updated: 4:49 pm
(Facebook Photo/Arizona Public Service)...
(Facebook Photo/Arizona Public Service)
(Facebook Photo/Arizona Public Service)

PHOENIX — The largest electric utility providers in Arizona are asking customers to conserve energy due to high demand amid scorching summer temperatures.

SRP added that the Salt Fire burning in Tonto National Forest has caused a transmission line to go out of service, affecting Valley customers.

“The loss of this transmission line could result in SRP not having sufficient power to meet high customer demand during record-hot temperatures,” SRP said in a statement.

APS has asked customers to conserve energy for two consecutive days.

“With the whole region experiencing extreme temperatures, the demand for electricity may approach the full capacity of supply available, which is why each customer taking steps to use less power will make a difference toward preventing any service interruptions,” Arizona Public Service said in a press release Tuesday.

To alleviate power usage, APS has asked customers to take the following steps from 3 p.m. to 8 p.m.:

  • Set thermostats to no lower than 80 degrees
  • Turn off extra lights
  • Avoid using major appliances such as clothes washers, dryers and dishwashers
  • Avoid operating pool pumps

The utility repeated the request Wednesday, saying in a press release: “This is a step APS is taking out of an abundance of caution in how we manage the grid, balance supplies and prepare for contingencies – it is not due to any shortages we expect in meeting our customers’ needs.”

On Tuesday, Phoenix continued its summer of scorching temperatures with its third consecutive daily heat record amid an excessive heat warning in effect through Thursday.

By 2:50 p.m. the temperature had hit the 115 degree mark for a record 11th time this year.

The National Weather Service also reported last week that it’s been the hottest summer on date, with an average temperature of 96 degrees.

This summer’s average high temperature of 107.9 degrees and average low temperature of 84.2 degrees are also record highs for the city.

And July 2020 went into the record books as the hottest month in Phoenix history, with an average temperature of 99 degrees.

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APS, SRP ask customers to conserve energy due to extreme demand