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Here’s what you need to know about the Nov. 5 elections in the Valley

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PHOENIX — Two Valley cities, dozens of local school districts and one sanitary district have measures on the ballot for the Nov. 5 election.

All elections are vote by mail. Maricopa County officials began mailing out nearly 2 million ballots last week.

Everyone eligible will get a by-mail ballot whether or not they are on a permanent early-voter list.

Returned ballots must be in the mail by Oct. 30, or they can be dropped off in person at voting centers by 7 p.m., when polls close on Election Day.

Here’s what you need to know about each election:

Glendale

Glendale residents will decide whether to increase salaries for the mayor and City Council members.

A “yes” vote on Proposition 424 would raise council members’ salaries from $34,000 to $52,685 and the mayor’s salary from $48,000 to $68,490. A “no” vote would keep the salaries as they are.

Voters will also decide whether to move the dates of primary elections to be in line with the rest of the state.

A “yes” vote on Proposition 425 would change the dates, while a “no” vote would have the city continue to hold primary elections on the eighth Tuesday before the first Tuesday after the first Monday in November.

Scottsdale

Scottsdale residents will vote whether to approve the issuance of $319 million in bonds for multiple city projects.

Those projects include adding a splash pad at McCormick-Stillman Railroad Park, renovating hiking trails at Pinnacle Peak Park, replacing the public address system at WestWorld and making other improvements to roads, sidewalks and computer equipment.

Fountain Hills

Fountain Hills residents will choose three of five members for the city’s Sanitary District Board of Directors.

Each director is elected to a four-year term. The other two members will be up for election in 2021.

The candidates are Jerry Butler, Michael Maroon and Bob Thomson, all incumbents, as well as Bob Shelstrom.

School Districts

More than two dozen school districts will vote to approve bond measures.

A list of participating school districts with more details is available here.

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