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Thunderstorms come close to Phoenix area, but dry heat keeping them at bay

(AP Photo)

PHOENIX – Signs of Arizona’s monsoon season have been showing up in other parts of the state, but so far the Phoenix area’s weather conditions have avoided the combination that creates the storms.

“Even if people think it’s humid out there, what we need to have is three days of 55 degree dew point. That provides enough fuel for thunderstorms. But we’re not going to hit it (in the next week),” Arizona State University climatologist Cerveny told KTAR News 92.3 FM on Monday.

The lack of major storm activity locally in July isn’t unusual, Cerveny said. The rainy weather has typically kicked in late in the month, he said.

“We’re still within reason of ‘going to have a monsoon but not to get too worried about it yet,'” Cerveny said.

The National Weather Service’s Phoenix bureau described Sunday as a low-grade monsoon day:

But outside of the Valley, rain came down hard over the weekend.

“It’s going to take a little more time for the moisture to actually get here into the Salt River Valley,” Cerveny said.

The Maricopa County Flood Control District reported dangerous heat conditions were also expected Tuesday, but not storm activity.

“It’s going to take a little more time for the moisture to actually get here into the Salt River Valley,” Cerveny said.

Up in Flagstaff, some weather professionals were actively rooting for the storm season to get underway:

An excessive heat warning was in effect Monday and Tuesday in the Phoenix area. Highs were expected to reach about 113 degrees both days.

KTAR News 92.3 FM’s Jim Cross contributed to this report.

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