Share this story...
Latest News

Scottsdale considering fees for when police respond to rowdy parties

(Pexels Photo)

PHOENIX – The city of Scottsdale is considering a proposal to charge fees of up to $1,500 when police respond to complaints about rowdy house parties.

The proposed ordinance would make it easier “to hold property owners accountable for repeated unruly gatherings or parties,” according to a post on the city’s website by Raun Keagy, planning and development area director.

“The response of police officers and other city personnel to a nuisance party location is a drain of personnel and resources which may leave other areas of the city without minimal levels of police and public safety protections, all of which creates a significant hazard to the safety of the police and other city personnel and to the public in general,” the ordinance says.

The city doesn’t have a current law to address what it defines as “nuisance parties” or “unlawful gatherings.”

Nuisance party is defined as an assembly of persons for a social activity or for a special occasion in a manner which constitutes a substantial disturbance of the quiet enjoyment of private or public property. This includes, but is not limited to, excessive noise or traffic, obstruction of public streets by crowds or vehicles, public drunkenness, the service of alcohol to minors, fights, disturbances of the peace and litter.

Unlawful gathering is defined as a party, gathering, or event where spirituous liquor is served to, or is in the possession of, or consumed by, any minor, or where illegal drugs are in the possession of, or consumed by, any person, regardless of whether it would otherwise qualify as a nuisance party.

Under the ordinance, the city would impose a “police service fee for special security assignments” related to party calls.

The fees would be $250 for first responses, $1,000 for second responses and $1,500 for third and additional responses.

The regulations would apply to all private residences, whether they are rentals or owner-occupied properties.

In some cases, rental property owners could be liable for fees when a tenant or other person was responsible for the party.

The City Council is expected to consider the ordinance during its Sept. 24 meeting.

Before then, the city is seeking public input on the measure, including at an information meeting Aug. 7 at 6 p.m. at the Community Design Studio at 7506 E. Indian School Road.

Comments also can be submitted via email or by letter addressed to Raun Keagy, Planning and Development Area director, City of Scottsdale, 7447 E. Indian School Road, Scottsdale, AZ, 85251.

Show Podcasts and Interviews

Reporter Stories