ARIZONA NEWS

Mesa student wants lawmakers to address school safety, not lemonade

May 8, 2019, 4:50 AM
(Pixabay Photo)...
(Pixabay Photo)
(Pixabay Photo)

PHOENIX — Soon, lemonade could become Arizona’s official state drink. A high schooler says lawmakers had better things they could have been doing than supporting that bill.

If lawmakers cared what students care about, “It should be the two pieces of legislation written by students that have to do with school safety and providing more mental health resources for our classrooms,” Jordan Harb, an organizer with March for Our Lives, said.

The senior at Mesa’s Mountain View High School also says lawmakers killed those bills after robust debate about lemonade, margaritas and sun tea.

Gov. Doug Ducey could soon sign HB 2692 into law approving lemonade as the state drink. He told KTAR News 92.3 FM’s Mac & Gaydos on Tuesday that he likes lemonade, but he wants to review the full bill before reaching a decision.

A Gilbert High School student lobbied lawmakers about the state drink bill.

“Lemonade’s delicious. Sign it if you like,” Harb said. “But before you sign it, make sure that students are included not only in what our state drink is, but in issues that directly impact us.”

“The March for Our Lives students still have yet to have a meeting with the governor formally to be involved in his budget and be involved in his school safety proposals,” Harb said.

Ducey said he would rather meet with school leaders to come up with ideas about safety and counseling.

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Mesa student wants lawmakers to address school safety, not lemonade