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Warm temperatures signal the start of scorpion season in Arizona

(Public Domain Photo)

PHOENIX – The rising temperatures across Arizona means summer has arrived, bringing along with it the return of scorpion season.

According to Banner Health, calls about scorpion stings are the most common animal-related calls the Banner Poison and Drug Information Center receives.

The calls are more prevalent during the summer months, but according to Frank LoVecchio, assistant medical director of Banner Poison and Drug Information Center, scorpion sightings aren’t uncommon year-round.

“Scorpions have been around forever,” LoVecchio said in a video. “And unfortunately, they are around almost all year but most prevalent during warmer days.”

The center received almost 7,500 scorpion-related phone calls last year, and has had 2,300 calls so far in 2018.

But even if you do have a run-in with the creepy critter and get stung, it’s best to remain calm.

“Most likely not much is going to happen,” LoVecchio said. “Most likely it is just going to hurt and you can probably take some Ibuprofen or Tylenol and it will go away.”

Scorpion stings often result in pain that eventually goes away, according to LoVecchio.

At times, a tingling sensation can also be felt near the area of the sting. But anything more than that is a rare occurrence.

“Sometimes it hurts, you get a tingling and you become unresponsive or not aware of your surroundings and you start thrashing about,” LoVecchio said. “Your eyes start moving in different directions, you start making lots of secretion. That is extremely rare”

Infants under a year old are often the victims of serious side effects from a scorpion sting, but even then could only suffer from pain.

LoVecchio encourages anyone with concerns after being stung to contact the poison center. At-home remedies, prevention tips and other information about a scorpion sting are made available for those that call.

“We will talk you through it,” LoVecchio said. “Our service calls you up every hour or so to see how you are doing until everything is resolved.”

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