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The Latest: San Diego DACA protest draws 1,000

DACA supporters march to the Immigration and Customs Enforcement office to protest shortly after U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions' announcement that the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), will be suspended with a six-month delay, Tuesday, Sept. 5, 2017, in Phoenix. President Donald Trump on Tuesday began dismantling the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, program, the government program protecting hundreds of thousands of young immigrants who were brought into the country illegally as children. (AP Photo/Matt York)

LOS ANGELES (AP) — The Latest on reaction to the Trump administration’s decision to end a program protecting young immigrants from deportation (all times local):

9:30 p.m.

Irving Uriel Hernandez de la Torre earned a degree in aerospace engineering from San Diego State University in May having paid his own way through school, and he recently landed an internship. But the 22-year-old DACA recipient who came to the U.S. when he was 6 is prepared to return to Mexico if the alternative is separating from his sister, who also has DACA, or his parents, who are in the country illegally.

Hernandez de la Torre acknowledges the risk of immigration authorities having his personal information. He lives with his parents and sister.

He said after addressing about 1,000 people at a rally in downtown San Diego “If they want to find me, they can find me.”

Hernandez de la Torre, whose work permit expires in September 2018, said his employment prospects in the U.S. are limited because many aerospace engineering require citizenship.

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6:45 p.m.

Hundreds of people are marching in the streets of downtown Los Angeles protesting President Donald Trump’s decision to rescind an immigration program for those who were brought to the United States illegally as children.

Protesters are holding posters Tuesday evening and chanting, “Hey, hey, ho, ho, Donald Trump has got to go” and “Our communities are under attack. What do we do? Stand up. Fight back.”

Some are waving American flags. Los Angeles police have been shutting down nearby intersections as the crowd marches.

Demonstrations were held nationwide Tuesday, including outside Trump Tower in New York, in San Francisco and near federal office buildings in Phoenix.

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5:40 p.m.

Civil rights organizations in New York have asked a federal judge to let them challenge President Donald Trump’s planned phaseout of a program shielding young immigrants from deportation.

The groups asked Tuesday to piggyback on an existing lawsuit brought last year by Martín Batalla Vidal, who was brought to the U.S. from Mexico by his parents when he was 7. Vidal is now 26.

Originally, Vidal had been fighting to revive an expansion of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program that had been halted by the courts.

Groups including Yale Law School students, the National Immigration Law Center and the anti-poverty group Make the Road New York now want to amend that suit to take on Trump’s plan to dismantle the program entirely.

They say Trump’s rollback violates the Constitution because it is based on discrimination over race, ethnicity or national origin.

“This decision by Donald Trump is a direct attack on immigrant youth like me and on our families, and it’s based on one thing: the racist beliefs of a president who has been attacking Latinos and Mexicans since the first day of his campaign,” Vidal said in a written statement.

U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions said the administration is ending DACA because it believed President Barrack Obama’s creation of the program without Congressional approval was “an unconstitutional exercise of authority.”

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3:17 p.m.

Advocates of immigration restrictions are applauding the demise of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program and say any effort to save it by Congress must be tied to new enforcement measures.

Center for Immigration Studies executive director Mark Krikorian says he supports letting DACA recipients stay if it comes if it comes with a requirement that employers electronically verify the immigration status of anyone they hire. He also says DACA recipients must be prohibited from getting legal status for their families and that the program can’t result in an increase in the overall number of green cards.

Dan Stein of the Federation for American Immigration Reform calls DACA an “unconstitutional abuse of executive authority” and says Congress now has a chance to keep it in place as part of a broader package that may include the border wall, more restrictions on legal immigration and stepped-up deportation efforts.

U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions said Tuesday that the administration will stop accepting new applications for DACA. Congress will get six months to pass a new version before officials stop renewing permits.

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3:03 p.m.

Washington state’s attorney general says he plans to sue the Trump administration over the decision to end a program protecting young immigrants from deportation, an act he said was “a dark time for our country.”

Bob Ferguson, who earlier this year sued Trump over the travel ban affecting mostly Muslim nations, said at a news conference Tuesday he would file a lawsuit “very soon.”

Attorneys general from California and New York have also indicated they plan legal action. Ferguson said he had been in contact with them.

Earlier Tuesday Attorney General Jeff Sessions said a program, known as the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals or DACA, will end in six months to give Congress time to find a legislative solution for the immigrants. They were brought to the U.S. illegally as children or came with families who overstayed visas.

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2:20 p.m.

The attorneys general of California and New York say they are prepared to take legal action against the Trump administration over its decision to end a program for young immigrants who were brought to the U.S. illegally as children or overstayed visas.

California Attorney General Xavier Becerra (HAH-vee-air Beh-sehr’-ah) says the state is prepared to defend participants in the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program. He says his office is evaluating Tuesday’s order to end the program in six months and determining what legal arguments to make in a lawsuit.

In New York, Gov. Andrew Cuomo (KWOH’-moh) and Attorney General Eric Schneiderman say ending the program allowing hundreds of thousands of immigrants to remain in the United States is cruel and unwarranted.

U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions said Tuesday the administration will stop accepting new applications for DACA. Congress will get six months to pass a new version before officials stop renewing permits.

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12:15 p.m.

Young immigrants are expressing their distress following President Donald Trump’s decision to rescind an immigration program for those who were brought to the United States illegally as children.

In New York, 26-year-old Karen Marin was in a physics class at Bronx Community College when she heard the news Tuesday.

Marin says she’s trying to pull herself together and hopes administration officials will change their minds and “realize what they’re doing is wrong.”

In Miami, 23-year-old Colombian Paola Martinez sobbed at the news and says she feels helpless. Martinez says it’s a step backward and she’ll be hiding “in the shadows again” when her work permit expires.

Protests are occurring across the country, including outside Trump Tower in Manhattan, where more than 30 people have been arrested.

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12 p.m.

University of California President Janet Napolitano has denounced what she calls President Donald Trump’s “misguided” decision to end a program protecting immigrants who were illegally brought to the U.S. as children.

Napolitano is urging Congress to pass bipartisan legislation to protect young immigrants from deportation.

The Trump administration announced Tuesday that it will phase out the program in six months.

Elsewhere, the presidents of the University of Connecticut and the Connecticut State University system joined Gov. Dannel P. Malloy in decrying Trump’s decision.

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11:05 a.m.

Hundreds of teachers and students are demonstrating outside Metro State University in Denver to protest President Donald Trump’s decision to repeal a program protecting young immigrants from deportation.

Protesters held posters Tuesday saying, “Accept my resistance and expect my resistance” and “No borders, no nations, no racists, no deportations.”

Demonstrations are occurring nationwide, including outside Trump Tower in Manhattan, near the Immigration and Customs Enforcement office in Phoenix, and in Miami, where young immigrants from Honduras, Mexico and Colombia are expressing shock and sadness.

In Los Angeles, marchers are gathering downtown.

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10:30 a.m.

Protests are underway after President Donald Trump’s decision to phase out a program for thousands of young immigrants who were brought into the United States illegally as children.

Police in New York handcuffed and removed over a dozen immigration activists who briefly blocked Fifth Avenue in Manhattan in front of Trump Tower. The protest Tuesday began with a march down the street and grew to about 400 people. Some cried as they held hands during a sit-in.

In Chicago, Mayor Rahm Emanuel told youths at a high school with a large number of students in the country illegally that they are welcome. The mayor says Chicago schools will be a “Trump-free zone.”

In Los Angeles, city and county officials plan to express their opposition at midday.

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