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  • In this Feb. 13, 2017 file photo, President Donald Trump watches as Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin walks to his fiancée Scottish actress Louise Linton after he was sworn-in by Vice President Mike Pence, in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington.   Trump plans to be among the guests as Mnuchin weds Linton Saturday at the Andrew W. Mellon Auditorium in Washington.  (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

    Trump, Pence to attend Treasury Secretary Mnuchin’s wedding

    WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump and Vice President Mike Pence plan to be among the guests as Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin (mih-NOO’-shin’s) weds a Scottish actress.

    Mnuchin is to exchange vows Saturday night with Louise Linton at the Andrew W. Mellon Auditorium in Washington. Mellon is a former treasury secretary.

    The 54-year-old Mnuchin worked for the Goldman Sachs investment firm for nearly two decades before founding a hedge fund. He also ran a company that invested in Hollywood movies. Mnuchin is one of the wealthier members of Trump’s Cabinet. He also was finance chairman of Trump’s presidential campaign.

    The 36-year-old Linton has appeared in movies and TV shows, and recently turned to producing movies. Mnuchin also produced movies before joining the government. It’ll be Mnuchin’s third marriage and the second for Linton. Copyright © The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.
  • Federal agencies demand records from SeaWorld theme park

    ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — A newspaper is reporting that two federal agencies are demanding records from SeaWorld.

    The Orlando Sentinel reported that new SEC filing disclosures released Friday show that agencies are asking for comments that executives and the company made in August 2014 about the critical “Blackfish” documentary.

    Both the U.S. Department of Justice and the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission have asked for information.

    The paper said the Department of Justice in June subpoenaed the theme park company as part of its investigation into “disclosures and public statements” that were made about the movie’s impact and trading in SeaWorld’s securities. The 2013 documentary chronicled the life of Tilikum, an orca that killed a SeaWorld trainer during a performance in […]
  • FILE - In this Aug. 15, 1996, file photo, rapper Tupac Shakur attends a voter registration event in South Central Los Angeles.  A music journalist has filed an infringement lawsuit against the creators of the new Tupac Shakur biopic, claiming that portions of the film are based on his interviews with the late rapper. Plantiff Kevin Powell claims in documents filed Friday, June 23, 2017 that "All Eyez On Me" borrows from articles he wrote and interviews he had done with Shakur in the 1990s for Vibe magazine.  (AP Photo/Frank Wiese, File)

    Writer sues Tupac filmmakers, alleges copyright infringement

    NEW YORK (AP) — A magazine writer has filed a copyright infringement lawsuit against the creators of the new Tupac Shakur biopic, saying that portions of the film are based on his articles about the late rapper.

    Kevin Powell says in the suit that “All Eyez On Me” borrows from articles he wrote and interviews he did with Shakur in the 1990s for Vibe magazine.

    The lawsuit says, for instance, the film’s fictional character Nigel is based on a character Powell wrote about in one of his magazine articles. The suit says the character is based on Jacques “Haitian Jack” Agnant, whom Powell interviewed.

    He sued Lionsgate, Program Pictures, Morgan Creek Pictures and others in the complaint, filed Friday in New York. A representative for Lionsgate declined to comment. Copyright © The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.
  • A fire patrol vehicle is parked outside Burnham block, part of the Chalcots Estate in the borough of Camden, north London, Saturday June 24, 2017, after the local council evacuated some 650 homes overnight. Camden Borough Council said in a statement Saturday that it housed many of the residents at two temporary shelters while many others were provided hotel rooms, after inspectors found fire safety issues in housing towers, following the inferno in a west London apartment block that killed 79. (AP Photo/Alastair Grant)

    UK fire safety crisis expands; Hundreds evacuated in London

    LONDON (AP) — Britain’s fire-safety crisis expanded substantially Saturday as London officials scrambled to evacuate four massive public housing towers due to concerns about flammable external cladding, problematic fire doors and insulation around gas pipes.

    Hundreds of residents hastily packed their bags and sought emergency shelter, with many angry and confused about the chaotic situation. Some refused to leave their high-rise apartments. Scores of evacuees slept on inflatable beds in a nearby gym while officials sought better accommodations for them.

    Camden Council said it decided to evacuate buildings on the Chalcots Estate late Friday after fire inspectors reported that the blocks were “not safe for people to sleep in overnight.” Council leader Georgia Gould said fire inspectors uncovered problems with “gas insulation and door stops,” which, combined with the presence of flammable cladding encasing the […]
  • Ex-doctor charged in pill mill scheme dies after being shot

    COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — A former Ohio doctor awaiting sentencing on charges related to operating an opioid “pill mill” has died after being fatally shot during an apparent home invasion.

    Fifty-one-year-old Kevin Lake died Friday night at a hospital after being shot Thursday morning in the Columbus suburb of Westerville.

    The Franklin County Sheriff’s Office said Lake’s son called 911 and reported hearing gunshots after someone tried to break into the home. Major Steve Tucker said the family had recently received a written threat.

    Lake pleaded guilty to federal charges in January for evading $3.5 million in taxes and for prescribing oxycodone, hydrocodone and Xanax to hundreds of patients daily at a Columbus medical clinic. He resigned as an Ohio University trustee on Jan. 21. Copyright © The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, […]
  • FILE - In this Jan. 25, 2017 file photo, Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner delivers speaks in the Illinois House chamber in Springfield, Ill. Illinois is on track to become the first U.S. state to have its credit rating downgraded to "junk" status, a move that will deepen a multibillion-dollar financial hole and cost taxpayers more for years to come. (Ted Schurter/The State Journal-Register via AP File)

    Illinois could be 1st state with ‘junk’ credit due to budget

    CHICAGO (AP) — Illinois is on track to become the first U.S. state to have its credit rating downgraded to “junk” status, which would deepen its multibillion-dollar deficit and cost taxpayers more for years to come.

    S&P Global Ratings has warned the agency will likely lower Illinois’ creditworthiness to below investment grade if feuding lawmakers fail to agree on a state budget for a third straight year, increasing the amount the state will have to pay to borrow money for things such as building roads or refinancing existing debt.

    The outlook for a deal wasn’t good Saturday, as lawmakers meeting in Springfield for a special legislative session remained deadlocked with the July 1 start of the new fiscal year approaching. That should alarm everyone, not just those at the Capitol, said Brian Battle, director at Performance Trust Capital Partners, a Chicago-based investment firm. “It […]
  • Russian President Vladimir Putin, flanked by Gazprom CEO Alexei Miller, right, visits the pipe laying vessel Pioneering Spirit in the Black Sea near Anapa, Russia, Friday, June 23, 2017. The president has inspected the work on the Turkish Stream gas pipeline project. (Mikhail Metzel/Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP)

    Russia’s Putin: Top goal for journalists is ‘do not offend’

    MOSCOW (AP) — Russian President Vladimir Putin says the most important principle for journalists is to avoid upsetting those featured in their articles and television broadcasts.

    Journalists should ensure their work “won’t be offensive to those about whom they do their reports,” Putin said Saturday, according to the TASS news agency.

    The Russian leader made the comments while talking to a child interested in working in journalism at a summer camp in Crimea, the southern Ukrainian region that Russia annexed in 2014.

    The number of independent media outlets in Russia has fallen drastically under Putin and there have been several murders of high-profile journalists. The journalists’ group Reporters Without Borders placed Russia 148th in its ranking of world press freedoms published this year. Copyright © The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, […]
  • Judge sides with AIDS Healthcare Foundation, dismisses suit

    FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. (AP) — A federal judge ruled in favor of one of the nation’s largest suppliers of HIV and AIDS medical care, clearing it of wrongdoing in an alleged $20 million scam to bilk the federal government.

    Three former managers of the AIDS Healthcare Foundation filed a federal lawsuit in South Florida in 2014 alleging the company paid employees and patients kickbacks for patient referrals to boost funding from federal health programs. Employees were paid $100 for referring patients with positive test results to its clinics and pharmacies.

    U.S. District Judge Kathleen M. Williams ruled in a decision unsealed this week that bonus payments were not subject to a 1972 law aimed at stopping unethical referrals because they fall under the statute’s employee safe harbor provision. The lawsuit claimed the kickbacks started in 2010 at the company’s California headquarters and spread to programs […]
  • Judge sides with AIDS Healthcare Foundation, dismisses suit

    FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. (AP) — A judge has ruled in favor of one of the nation’s largest suppliers of HIV and AIDS medical care, clearing the company of wrongdoing in an alleged $20 million scam to bilk the federal government.

    According to a federal lawsuit in 2014, three former managers of the AIDS Healthcare Foundation said the company paid employees and patients kickbacks for patient referrals. Employees were paid $100 for referring patients with positive tests to its clinics and pharmacies.

    U.S. District Judge Kathleen M. Williams ruled in a decision unsealed this week that bonus payments made by the foundation to coordinators who directed patients to AIDS Healthcare were not subject to a 1972 law aimed at stopping unethical referrals because they fall under the statute’s employee safe harbor provision. Copyright © The Associated Press. […]
  • In this June 21, 2017, photo, President Donald Trump speaks during a rally in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. Trump has a way of presenting missions as accomplished even when they're not. So it was when he told Iowans he's put farmers back at their plows, secured a historic increase in military spending and empowered homebuilders to swing their hammers again. Those all remain aspirations, not achievements. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall, file)

    AP FACT CHECK: Trump and missions unaccomplished

    WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump has a way of presenting missions as accomplished even when they’re not.

    So it was when he told Iowans he’s put farmers back at their plows, secured a historic increase in military spending and empowered homebuilders to swing their hammers again. Those all remain aspirations, not achievements.

    Trump is also known to propose something already in effect, as when he declared “the time has come” for a welfare moratorium for immigrants. President Bill Clinton signed such a moratorium into law in 1996.

    A look at a variety of Trump’s statements from the public square over the past week: TRUMP: “We’re thinking about building the wall as a solar wall so it creates energy and pays for itself. And this way, Mexico will have to pay much less money. And that’s good right? … Pretty good imagination, right? […]
  • FILE - This Jan. 25, 2012, file photo, shows the U.S. Supreme Court Building in Washington. The Supreme Court enters its final week of work before a long summer hiatus with action expected on the Trump administration’s travel ban and a decision due in a separation of church and state case that arises from a Missouri church playground. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

    Big cases, retirement rumors as Supreme Court nears finish

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court enters its final week of work before a long summer hiatus with action expected on the Trump administration’s travel ban and a decision due in a separation of church and state case that arises from a Missouri church playground.

    The biggest news of all, though, would be if Justice Anthony Kennedy were to use the court’s last public session on Monday to announce his retirement.

    To be sure, Kennedy has given no public sign that he will retire this year and give President Donald Trump his second high court pick in the first months of his administration. Kennedy’s departure would allow conservatives to take firm control of the court. But Kennedy turns 81 next month and has been on the […]
  • FILE - In this June 2, 2017, file photo Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi speaks in St. Petersburg, Russia. The Trump administration is set to authorize the sale of surveillance drones to India as the two nations' leaders prepare for their first face-to-face meeting on June 26. That's according to a congressional aide and an industry representative speaking to The Associated Press. (Mikhail Metzel/TASS News Agency Pool Photo via AP)

    Trump approves $2B sale of drones to India ahead of meeting

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration has authorized the sale of unarmed surveillance drones to India, the manufacturer said Friday, as the two nations’ leaders prepare for their first face-to-face meeting.

    India initiated its request to buy 22 Guardian MQ-9B unmanned aircraft for maritime surveillance last year. The deal is estimated to be worth about $2 billion. The offer is still subject to congressional approval.

    The green light from the administration marks a further deepening in defense ties as India’s Prime Minister Narendra Modi meets with President Donald Trump at the White House on Monday. Modi’s two-day visit to Washington, which starts Sunday, takes place amid uncertainty over the relationship because of differences on trade and other issues. So far […]
  • FILE - In this April 3, 2017, file photo, the Senate side of the Capitol is seen in Washington. Republicans in full control of government are on the brink of history-making changes to the nation's health care system, but "Obamacare" is only half the story _ and many people may not realize that. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

    Consumer issues stemming from the GOP health care initiative

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Republicans in full control of government are on the brink of history-making changes to the nation’s health care system. The impact for consumers would go well beyond “Obamacare.”

    Former President Barack Obama’s signature law is usually associated with subsidized insurance markets like HealthCare.gov. But the Affordable Care Act also expanded Medicaid.

    Not only would the GOP legislation scale back coverage through the insurance markets and phase out the Medicaid expansion, it would also make fundamental changes to the broader Medicaid program. The federal-state program covers low-income people, from newborns to elderly nursing home residents, from special-needs kids to young adults caught in the opioid epidemic.

    House Republicans have passed their health care bill, and Senate GOP leaders are driving toward a vote next week. President Donald Trump is waiting, eager to deliver on a campaign promise to repeal the law. Against fast-moving developments, a look at some major issues for consumers. WHY MEDICAID MATTERS As health care costs have kept […]
  • Sen. Dean Heller, R-Nev., during a press conference where he announced he will vote no on the proposed GOP healthcare bill at the Grant Sawyer State Office Building on Friday, June 23, 2017 in Las Vegas. (Erik Verduzco/Las Vegas Review-Journal via AP)

    5 GOP senators now oppose health care bill as written

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Nevada Republican Dean Heller became the fifth GOP senator to declare his opposition to the party’s banner legislation to scuttle much of Barack Obama’s health care overhaul on Friday, more than enough to sink the measure and deliver a stinging rebuke to President Donald Trump unless some of them can be brought aboard.

    Echoing the other four, Heller said he opposes the measure “in this form” but does not rule out backing a version that is changed to his liking. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., has said he’s willing to alter the measure to attract support, and next week promises plenty of back-room bargaining as he tries pushing a final package through his chamber.

    Nonetheless, Heller’s announcement underscores the scant margin of error Republican leaders must deal with. Facing unanimous Democratic opposition, McConnell can afford to lose just two of the 52 GOP senators and still prevail. Besides the five who’ve announced outright opposition, several other GOP senators — conservatives and moderates — have declined to commit to the […]
  • President Donald Trump speaks during a bill signing event for the "Department of Veterans Affairs Accountability and Whistleblower Protection Act of 2017" in the East Room of the White House, Friday, June 23, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

    Trump leaving McConnell to handle Senate bill on health care

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Donald Trump’s bull-in-a-china-shop approach to the presidency hasn’t helped him notch significant victories on Capitol Hill over his first five months in office. The nuts and bolts of legislation and the maddening, unpredictable ways and rhythms of Congress can seem foreign to him. Most of his top advisers have little Washington experience — and it’s showed.

    Now, facing an enormous challenge in the Senate on health care, Trump and his team are opting for a hands-off approach on legislation to dismantle the “Obamacare” law, instead putting their faith in Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell to deliver a legacy-defining victory.

    “Sen. McConnell has said that he wants a vote next week and that’s up to him to run the chamber the way he sees fit. But the president is very supportive of the bill,” White House press secretary Sean Spicer said Friday. The strategy follows Trump’s seat-of-the-pants approach on health care in the House that […]