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A look at Colorado's record on the death penalty
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A look at Colorado’s record on the death penalty

A row of crosses stands along Alameda Avenue near the intersection of Sable Boulevard to honor the 12 victims of the massacre at a nearby movie theatre and to mark the third anniversary of the killing spree, Monday, July 20, 2015, in Aurora, Colo. James Holmes, who had been working toward his Ph.D. in neuroscience, could get the death penalty for the massacre that left 12 people dead and dozens of others wounded early Friday, July 20, 2012. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

DENVER (AP) — Colorado theater shooter James Holmes will be sentenced to either death or life in prison without parole after the penalty phase of his trial, which starts Wednesday. Either way, Holmes can expect to spend decades in prison. Here’s a look at Colorado’s record on the death penalty:

LAST EXECUTION

Colorado has executed only one person since 1967, Gary Lee Davis, who was put to death in 1997 for kidnapping and raping Virginia May, 33, near her Byers home, then shooting her 14 times with a .22-caliber rifle.

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EXECUTION METHOD

Colorado law calls for lethal injections to be applied at the Colorado State Penitentiary in Canon City.

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DEATH ROW

Colorado has no physical “death row.” Inmates awaiting execution are held with others serving lesser sentences in “management control units” at the Sterling Correctional Facility in southern Colorado. These units are more closely monitored than other parts of the maximum security prison, but inmates awaiting capital punishment live in similar conditions.

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WHO’S ON IT

NATHAN DUNLAP: Dunlap, now 41, was sentenced to die in 1996 for the shooting deaths of four workers — including three teens — who were cleaning a Chuck E. Cheese restaurant in Aurora. The U.S. Supreme Court rejected his last guaranteed appeal in February 2013, but Gov. John Hickenlooper granted him an indefinite reprieve in May 2013, nearly 20 years after his conviction and just three months before he was set to die. A future governor could lift the reprieve.

SIR MARIO OWENS: Owens, now 30, was sentenced to die 2008 for the shooting deaths of Javad Marshall-Fields and his fiancee, Vivian Wolfe. Marshall-Fields, 21, was scheduled to testify against Owens and another man in a separate slaying. He and Wolfe, 22, were killed in 2005 while sitting in a car in Aurora. Appeals are pending.

ROBERT RAY: Ray, now 29, also was sentenced to die in 2009 for the shooting deaths of Javad Marshall-Fields and Vivian Wolfe. Marshall-Fields was set to testify against Ray and Sir Mario Owens in a separate slaying. Appeals are pending.

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