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Here are the results for the US Representative races in Arizona

FILE - In this Sept. 3, 2018, file photo, the U.S. Capitol in Washington. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

PHOENIX — Hundreds of thousands of voters showed up to elect a new U.S. senator, U.S. representatives, state representatives and more.

Here are all of the results for Arizona’s congressional races from Tuesday’s election:


U.S. Congressional District 1

(AP photo)

Arizona’s 1st Congressional District will remain under Democratic control after U.S. Rep. Tom O’Halleran defeated Republican Wendy Rogers with 53 percent of the vote in Tuesday’s election.

“I am humbled and grateful for the outpouring of support my campaign has received from Democrats, Republicans, and Independents alike,” O’Halleran said in a statement.

“I want to thank the hardworking volunteers who have spent thousands of hours getting voters to the polls and sharing our message of commonsense problem-solving.”

The win helped Democrats seize control of the House on Tuesday, a victory that means divided government returns to a Washington already prone to partisan gridlock.

The seat that stretches from far northern Arizona to the suburbs north of Tucson was drawn to be competitive, but it has been reliably Democrat since 2012.

O’Halleran, 72, has been on both sides of the political spectrum, as a Republican in the Arizona Legislature from 2001 to 2009 and as a Democrat in Congress.

He said the country must invest in its citizens, education and the economy and vowed to work to protect Social Security and Medicaid from cut-backs and ensure immigration reform is comprehensive.

Rogers ran on a campaign that was very much aligned with President Donald Trump and proudly proclaimed that she would have supported his agenda if elected.

A win for Rogers on Nov. 6 would have made it harder for Democrats to gain control of the House. It also would have countered a potential Democratic pickup in Arizona’s 2nd District.

O’Halleran won the seat in 2014 with 50 percent of the vote, narrowly beating out former Pinal County Sheriff Paul Babeu.

U.S. Congressional District 2

(AP photo)

Martha McSally’s former seat in Arizona’s 2nd Congressional District will switch parties, as Democrat Ann Kirkpatrick received 55 percent of the votes to Republican Lea Marquez Peterson’s 44 percent.

The district was very competitive leading up to Tuesday’s election: Seven Democrats and four Republicans sought to succeed McSally in the August primary. Democrats scored a major victory in Kirkpatrick’s win, as the seat was a key pickup for party leaders who hoped to take control of the House.

The district is home to around 136,000 Democrats, 133,000 Republicans, and about 121,000 unaffiliated voters, according to state election data.

The vast majority of voters live in Pima County, as the district covers a majority of Tucson, the state’s second-biggest city and home to the University of Arizona.

But around 69,000 voters out of around 394,000 live in the vast rural expanse of Cochise County.

Border security and immigration policy were at the top of mind for many voters, as the district is one of nine in the U.S. that touch the Mexico border.

It also has a noted military presence: the Davis-Monthan Air Force Base in Tucson and Fort Huachuca in Sierra Vista, which is 75 miles to the southeast.

Voters here have elected representatives from both parties. The seat was once held by Democratic former Rep. Gabby Giffords, then former Rep. Ron Barber before McSally flipped it to red.

In 2016, McSally beat Heinz with about 57 percent of the vote. That same election, voters in the district picked Hillary Clinton for president over Trump by about 5 percentage points, after narrow victories for the Republican nominees in 2012 and 2008.

U.S. Congressional District 3

(AP photo)

Incumbent Democrat Raul Grijalva held on to his seat in Arizona’s 3rd Congressional District, beating out Republican Nicolas Pierson with 60 percent of the vote.

The district, which encompasses the southwestern portions of the state, shares the border of Mexico from Nogales to California.

It has been under Democratic control since Grijalva, 70, was elected in 2012.

U.S. Congressional District 4

(AP photo)

Arizona’s 4th Congressional District will remain under Republican control, after incumbent Paul Gosar won his re-election bid with 66 percent of the vote over Democrat David Brill.

While Gosar’s win came easily on Tuesday, his campaign has been marred with controversy: Six of his siblings were featured in a series of campaign ads for Brill, saying that Gosar has gone down the wrong path.

“I think my brother has traded a lot of the values we had at our kitchen table,” one of his sisters, Joan, said in the ad.

“It’s intervention time, and intervention time means that you go to vote and you go to vote Paul out,” Tim said.

A OH Predictive Insights/ABC15 poll showed that the ads did little to hurt Gosar: The September survey showed the Republican outdistancing Brill, 57 percent to 25 percent.

Gosar, 59, will represent the district that stretches from Phoenix to contain much of the rural western and northwestern portion of the state.

U.S. Congressional District 5

(Twitter photo)

Incumbent Republican Andy Biggs won his re-election bid with 59 percent of the vote over Democrat Joan Greene.

The district contains Gilbert, Queen Creek, southern and eastern Chandler and eastern Mesa.

Biggs was elected to the seat in 2016. The district has been under Republican control since 2010, when U.S. Rep. David Schweikert was elected. Former U.S. Rep. Matt Salmon served in the district from 2012 to 2016.

U.S. Congressional District 6

(Facebook photo)

Arizona’s 6th Congressional District was represented by incumbent Republican David Schweikert, who earned 56 percent of votes to Democrat Anita Malik’s 43 percent.

It will be Schweikert’s fifth term in Congress.

The district is predominantly Republican and covers northern Phoenix suburbs including Scottsdale, Paradise Valley, Cave Creek and Fountain Hills.

While Schweikert’s re-election bid was easily won after running unopposed in the primary, it was also not without controversy: His chief of staff resigned  in July amid a House Ethics Committee investigation.

Oliver Schwab stepped down to have surgery and work as a U.S. Coast Guard licensed maritime captain after the ethics committee unanimously voted to create a special subcommittee to investigate Schweikert and Schwab for misspending and other issues.

The decision followed an investigation by the House Office of Congressional Ethics, an independent body that only refers cases where it has already found substantial evidence of a violation.

Schwab worked with the Arizona Republican since January 2011, when Schweikert first joined the House of Representatives.

U.S. Sen. Jeff Flake served in the Congressional seat from 2002 to 2012.

U.S. Congressional District 7

(AP photo)

Incumbent Democrat Ruben Gallego easily won his re-election bid, beating out Green Party candidate Gary Swing and write-in Republican candidate James “007” Bond, IV — yes, really — with 83 percent of the vote.

The district has been under Democrat control and has voted Democrat in each presidential election since it was formed after the 2000 Census.

Raul Grijalva represented the district from 2002 to 2012, followed by Ed Pastor from 2012 to 2014.

The district includes much of inner Phoenix, as well as the eastern portion of Glendale.

U.S. Congressional District 8

(Facebook photo)

The bid for Arizona’s 8th Congressional District was one of the more recognizable and competitive House races in Arizona.

Incumbent Republican Debbie Lesko was originally elected to the seat in April to fill the seat left vacant by Trent Franks, who resigned last year following a sexual harassment scandal.

Lesko again beat Democrat Hiral Tipirneni in Tuesday’s election, 56 percent to 43 percent.

The pair first faced off for the seat in the April special election, when Lesko beat Tipirneni with 53 percent of the vote.

Lesko has also seen help from President Donald Trump in her re-election bid. Lesko appeared at a Mesa rally for the president last month and has had his support since the April special election.

The special election did not see much controversy, but this time around Lesko has picked up some negative headlines after her campaign distributed signs that read “fake doctor” and pointed toward Tipirneni’s signs.

Lesko told KTAR News 92.3 FM’s Arizona’s Morning News that she did so because Tipirneni “has not made it clear that she is not a practicing doctor.

“In fact, the central theme of her campaign — she’s in scrubs, she’s working on patients, and another media organization during the special election pointed out that she hasn’t practiced for over a decade,” Lesko said.

Tipirneni has had an active medical license in Arizona since 1997.

The district sprawling across western Phoenix suburbs included some of the most conservative areas of the red state, including the retirement communities of Sun City and the Glendale home of former GOP Gov. Jan Brewer.

U.S. Congressional District 9

(Flickr/Gage Skidmore)

Greg Stanton, the former mayor of Phoenix, will take a new home in Washington, D.C. after beating Republican Steve Ferrara in the race for Arizona’s 9th Congressional District, 59 percent to 40 percent.

Stanton will take over the seat formerly held by U.S. Rep. Kyrsten Sinema, ensuring the district stays under Democratic control.

Stanton resigned as Phoenix mayor in May to pursue the congressional run.

Statistics website FiveThirtyEight projected a win for Stanton, while another site, Real Clear Politics, described the race as favoring Democrats.

The district is located entirely within Maricopa County and includes Tempe, southern Scottsdale, western Mesa, northwestern Chandler and southern Phoenix.

Sinema has been the district’s only representative since it was formed after the 2010 Census.

The Associated Press contributed to this report. 

KTAR News 92.3 FM brings you complete election coverage all day Tuesday, including post-election coverage until 10 p.m.

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