Share this story...
Latest News

Senate candidate Kyrsten Sinema won’t say she’s proud of Democrats

PHOENIX – U.S. Senate candidate Kyrsten Sinema said that while she’s a Democrat, it’s not a point she’s putting at the forefront of her campaign.

“I’m not particularly proud of the parties,” Sinema told KTAR News 92.3 FM’s Mac & Gaydos during an in-studio interview Wednesday.

Sinema is running against fellow U.S. congresswoman Martha McSally and trying to become the first Democrat to win a Senate race in Arizona since Dennis DeConcini in 1988.

“I’m not sure that people are even proud of parties anymore because I feel like the parties are, ick, not doing a good job,” she said.

“I would say I’m a proud Arizonan, that’s something I’m very proud of.”

The three-term U.S. representative said it’s not an accident that her campaign ads don’t actually mention her party.

“Because I am an independent voice for Arizonans and I want folks to — when the see my ads or hear from me, or when I’m talking to them or listening to them — I want them to think about who I am as their elected official and as their public servant,” she said.

Sinema said she has no problem working with President Donald Trump, even though she doesn’t like some of his policies — using tariffs that are bad for Arizona businesses as an example.

“Work with him on stuff you can work on him with, and oppose him on the stuff you can’t. … If it’s bad for Arizona, you’ve just got to oppose it,” she said.

Sinema said she was grateful when Trump signed a bill that addressed issues with the Veterans Administration health care system.

“I was so proud when we got our bill allowing us to protect whistleblowers and fire the bad guys at the VA, which you know I’ve been trying to do for years,” she said.

She continued, “If you recall, President Obama was not supportive of that legislation.”

Sinema has not endorsed the state’s Democratic candidate for governor, David Garcia, but she wouldn’t reveal whether she was voting for Doug Ducey, the Republican incumbent.

“David and I have real differences on substantive policy issues, but I do respect that he works hard to share his vision with the community,” she said.

Mac & Gaydos

Show Podcasts and Interviews

Reporter Stories