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Rangers reminding visitors to hike smart at Grand Canyon this summer

FILE - In this March 16, 2015, file photo, hikers stop and take photos along the Grand Canyon National Park's South Kaibab trail. (AP Photo/Anna Johnson, File)

PHOENIX — The National Park Service wants hikers to be prepared when they head out to the Grand Canyon during the hot summer months.

“June is typically a very hot dry month in Northern Arizona,” said Emily Davis, a Grand Canyon National Park spokeswoman.

“Especially if anyone is hiking below the rim of the canyon, we want everyone to be prepared and know what to expect here.”

Hikers should be aware of the weather forecast — for not only the rim, but also the inner canyon, where it can often be the hottest and driest. The National Weather Service also has a website for the weather forecast at the bottom of the canyon.

Davis told KTAR News 92.3 FM on Wednesday that “hikers need to wear appropriate clothes with loose-fitting cotton and bring along hats, sunscreen, plenty of water, snacks and make a good plan for the day.”

The best time to hike is before 10 a.m. and after 4 p.m. to avoid the heat of the day. In the case a hiker feels the heat has already gotten to them, the best thing to do is find shade and stay there until the temperature drops.

“If you have any extra water with you dump that on your shirt or head to help you cool off,” Davis added.

The National Park Service recommends anyone who comes to the Grand Canyon should first visit one of their back-country offices, which are located at both the North and South rims of the canyon, and talk to a park ranger.

“Stop in there, see what the rangers have to say about what the trail conditions are like, what the upcoming forecast is, and other things like where hikers might expect to find water on the trails,” Davis said.

Park rangers are also stationed throughout the Grand Canyon to help any visitors passing through the more popular trails, also known as the Corridor Trails.

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