Share this story...
People visit the Supreme Court in Washington, Monday, June 26, 2017, as justices issued their final rulings for the term. The high court is letting a limited version of the Trump administration ban on travel from six mostly Muslim countries to take effect, a victory for President Donald Trump in the biggest legal controversy of his young presidency. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
Latest News

The Latest: Trump travel ban takes effect Thursday

People visit the Supreme Court in Washington, Monday, June 26, 2017, as justices issued their final rulings for the term. The high court is letting a limited version of the Trump administration ban on travel from six mostly Muslim countries to take effect, a victory for President Donald Trump in the biggest legal controversy of his young presidency. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on the Supreme Court’s decision on the Trump administration’s travel ban (all times local):

6:20 p.m.

The State Department says it will start implementing President Donald Trump’s ban on travel from six mostly Muslim countries 72 hours after it was partly reinstated by the Supreme Court.

That means the temporary ban will go into effect Thursday morning.

State Department spokeswoman Heather Nauert says her agency will provide more details about how it will be implemented after consulting with the Justice and Homeland Security departments. She says the U.S. government will keep people traveling to the U.S. and members of the travel industry informed “in a professional, organized and timely way.”

She says the U.S. is also working with its partners to implement the part of the ban that affects refugee admissions to the U.S. She says the State Department will keep the U.S. Refugee Admissions Program updated about changes “as they take effect.”

___

3 p.m.

The imam of a Hawaii mosque who is a plaintiff in the state’s challenge to the travel ban says he hopes his Syrian mother-in-law will be granted a visa.

Ismail Elshikh (EES-my-ayl-el-sheek) said Monday he’s not optimistic because of the delays in his mother-in-law’s application and the additional paperwork being requested.

He says his children are disappointed their grandmother couldn’t be in Hawaii to celebrate Eid al-Fitr on Sunday, the end of the fasting month of Ramadan.

The nation’s highest court on Monday said it would let a limited version of Trump’s ban on travel from six mostly Muslim countries take effect. The ban on visitors from Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen can be enforced as long if those visitors lack a “credible claim of a bona fide relationship with a person or entity in the United States.”

___

1:16 p.m.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions says the Justice Department looks forward to defending the travel ban when the Supreme Court hears arguments in the case in October.

Sessions says Monday’s decision is “an important step toward restoring the separation of powers between the branches of the federal government” by recognizing the president’s right to protect national security.

The court is letting the administration mostly enforce its 90-day ban on travelers from six mostly Muslim countries. The court’s opinion said two federal appeals courts that had blocked the policy went too far to limit Trump’s authority over immigration.

Sessions says the travel ban case “raises profound questions about the proper balance of these constitutional powers.”

Sessions says vetting of those seeking to come to the U.S. is crucial for national security.

__

12:15 p.m.

President Donald Trump is hailing Monday’s Supreme Court decision on his controversial travel ban as a “clear victory for our national security.”

Trump says in a statement that his “number one responsibility” is to keep the American people safe.

The nation’s highest court on Monday said it would let a limited version of Trump’s ban on travel from six mostly Muslim countries take effect. The ban on visitors from Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen can be enforced as long if those visitors lack a “credible claim of a bona fide relationship with a person or entity in the United States.”

The justices will hear full arguments in the October.

__

10:33 a.m.

The Supreme Court is letting the Trump administration mostly enforce its 90-day ban on travelers from six mostly Muslim countries, overturning lower court orders that blocked it.

The action Monday is a victory for President Donald Trump in the biggest legal controversy of his young presidency.

The court did leave one category of foreigners protected, those “with a credible claim of a bona fide relationship with a person or entity in the United States,” the court said in an unsigned opinion.

The justices will hear arguments in the case in October.

Trump said last week that the ban would take effect 72 hours after being cleared by courts.

The ban would apply to citizens of Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen.

The Trump administration said the ban was needed to allow an internal review of the screening procedures for visa applicants from those countries.

__

3:10 a.m.

The focus is on the Supreme Court as the high-stakes legal fight over President Donald Trump’s travel ban awaits action by the justices.

The court is expected to decide within days whether the Trump administration can enforce a ban on visitors to the U.S. from six mostly Muslim countries — Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen.

Trump rolled out a travel ban just a week after his Jan. 20 inauguration, but lower federal courts have blocked it and a revised version — and one court also has blocked a 120-day halt on refugee arrivals in the United States.

The president casts the travel ban as critical to deterring possible terrorist attacks in the United States. Opponents say it targets Muslims in violation of federal law and the Constitution.

_

Copyright © The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.