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The Latest: Coroner’s office IDs skydiver as California man

LODI, Calif. (AP) — The Latest on a skydiving death in Northern California (all times local):

1:05 p.m.

Authorities have identified the skydiver who fell to his death in a California vineyard as 42-year-old Matthew Ciancio.

San Joaquin County Sheriff’s Deputy Dave Konecny released the name Thursday, saying that Ciancio was from June Lake in Mono County, California.

Ciancio was wearing a wingsuit when he crashed.

A wingsuit is a specialized jumpsuit that resembles a flying squirrel. It’s one of the most extreme forms of BASE jumping, but a growing number of people are using wingsuits in skydiving, with a mandatory parachute.

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11:55 a.m.

U.S. investigators are scrutinizing the death of a skydiver wearing a wingsuit who crashed in a California vineyard.

Federal Aviation Administration spokesman Ian Gregor said Thursday that an inspector is at the crash site near the Lodi Parachute Center in Acampo, about 30 miles south (48 kilometers) of Sacramento.

Wingsuit fliers use a specialized jumpsuit that resembles a flying squirrel. It’s one of the most extreme forms of BASE jumping, but a growing number of people are using wingsuits in skydiving, with a mandatory parachute.

The U.S. Parachute Association says eight wingsuit skydiving deaths have occurred since 2011, including Wednesday’s fatality.

The victim’s name hasn’t been released.

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5:15 a.m.

A person has died after a skydiving trip went wrong in California.

Federal Aviation Administration spokesman Ian Gregor says the person had been wearing a wingsuit when they crashed Wednesday.

The Sacramento Bee reports (http://bit.ly/2qfR3bY) that the Woodbridge Fire District has called the incident a parachute accident.

District Chief Steve Butler says the man who has not been named landed in a vineyard.

The Federal Aviation Administration will investigate the incident.

Butler had said no additional details are available.

Three people died last year in accidents near the Lodi Parachute Center. A tightly packed skydiving plane carrying 18 people also landed upside down in an Acampo vineyard last May.

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