Share this story...
Latest News

The Latest: Indiana’s AG urged to appeal abortion ruling

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — The Latest on a federal ruling blocking Indiana’s latest abortion ultrasound mandate (all times local):

2:40 p.m.

An anti-abortion group is urging Indiana’s attorney general to appeal a federal ruling that blocks a state mandate which forced women to undergo an ultrasound at least 18 hours before having an abortion.

Indiana Right to Life President Mike Fichter says he wants Indiana Attorney General Curtis Hill to appeal the case to a higher court and continue the fight “to put a time requirement on our state’s ultrasound law.”

Fichter on Monday called U.S. District Court Judge Tanya Walton Pratt’s ruling “sadly predictable.” He says she has “consistently issued rulings that favor the abortion industry.”

The ultrasound requirement took effect last July as part of a wide-ranging abortion law. Pratt had previously blocked two of its other provisions, including a ban on abortions sought due to fetal genetic abnormalities.

___

2:05 p.m.

The president of Planned Parenthood of Indiana and Kentucky is praising a federal judge’s ruling that blocks an Indiana mandate which forced women to undergo an ultrasound at least 18 hours before having an abortion.

Betty Cockrum calls Friday’s decision “an incredibly strong ruling” that protects Indiana women’s constitutional right to an abortion.

She said at a news conference Monday the ultrasound mandate forced women to make two separate trips to Planned Parenthood centers because they had to get an ultrasound at least 18 hours before they could have an abortion.

Cockrum says Indiana’s mandate created scheduling and travel burdens that threatened some women’s ability to legally obtain a medical or surgical abortion.

American Civil Liberties Union of Indiana legal director Ken Falk says Indiana has 30 days to appeal the ruling.

__

9:56 a.m.

A federal judge in Indianapolis has blocked a state mandate that forced women to undergo an ultrasound at least 18 hours before having an abortion.

Planned Parenthood of Indiana and Kentucky sought the preliminary injunction.

U.S. District Judge Tanya Walton Pratt wrote in Friday’s ruling that Indiana’s mandate “creates significant financial and other burdens” on the group and its patients, particularly low-income women.

Her ruling says those women face “clearly undue” burdens, including lengthy travel to one of only six Planned Parenthood health centers that can offer an informed-consent ultrasound appointment.

The ultrasound requirement took effect last July. Pratt has also blocked a separate part of the abortion law that banned the procedure if it was requested due to fetal genetic abnormalities.

Copyright © The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Related Links