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This undated image provided by World View shows World View capsule and balloon spacecraft that will rise to 100,000 feet above Earth for passengers to see the curvature of the planet and the blackness of space. Space tourism companies are employing designs including winged vehicles, vertical rockets with capsules and high-altitude balloons. While developers envision ultimately taking people to orbiting habitats, the moon or beyond, the immediate future involves short flights into or near the lowest reaches of space without going into orbit. (World View via AP)
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Report: Arizona high-tech balloon company awarded 2 NASA grants

This undated image provided by World View shows World View capsule and balloon spacecraft that will rise to 100,000 feet above Earth for passengers to see the curvature of the planet and the blackness of space. Space tourism companies are employing designs including winged vehicles, vertical rockets with capsules and high-altitude balloons. While developers envision ultimately taking people to orbiting habitats, the moon or beyond, the immediate future involves short flights into or near the lowest reaches of space without going into orbit. (World View via AP)

One company in Tucson, Arizona, earned two grants from NASA in order to continue its radiation study.

According to the Phoenix Business Journal, the company World View, who “manufactures high-tech balloons that operate high in the earth’s atmosphere,” got the two grants to take the next step in improving the safety of flight crews from radiation.

It’s called NASA’s Automated Radiation Measurements for Aerospace Safety–High Altitude (ARMAS-Hi) study, with its purpose being “to forecast radiation exposure to flight crews and passengers. Radiation in space can penetrate down to the 35,000- to 37,000-foot level where passenger aircraft fly.”

The Phoenix Business Journal said the study will last five to 10 years to collect all of the necessary data, and to create its forecasting system.

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